Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Nonverbal Communication

Volume, Rate, Pitch, Pause, Articulation, Pronunciation. Body Language, Attire, Eye Contact, Posture, Expressions, etc.
by

Kaddisha Meneses

on 23 February 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Nonverbal Communication

Nonverbal Communication
Vocal Cues & Body Language
Volume
Rate
Pitch
Articulation
Pronunciation
Pauses
Body Language
Intensity of Voice: how loud or soft you speak.
Speed at which you speak: How fast or slow you speak.
.
A momentary break.
Formation of clear distinct sounds in your speech.
Accepted standard of a sound or rhythm.
Attire
Clothing
Accessories
Make-up
Hair
EYE CONTACT
Facial Expressions
Gestures
Posture
Proxemics
The lowness or highness of your voice.
Unfilled
Silence
Taking breath
Filled
Um
Er
You know
Stressing or emphasizing
Example: having an accent
Insurance
New Orleans
Genuine
February
Example: Adding/Omission
Company
Want to
History
Better
Etcetera
EYE CONTACT
Communicating Emotions
Helps clarify or reinforce verbal communication.
150 words per min. is the average.
The space between speakes
Elevator Norms
Stop for a moment and notice how you’re sitting. What does your position say nonverbaly
about how you feel?
We can tell a good deal about how others feel simply by watching how tense or loose they seem to be. For example, tenseness is a way of detecting status differences: The lower-status person is generally the more rigid, tense-appearing one, whereas the one with higher status is more relaxed.
Take a look at your friends. Do you find that the people who spend time together share the
same ideas about clothing?
Bali Dancers
Full transcript