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A Critical Look at Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty"

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by

Mary Margaret Healy

on 5 May 2014

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Transcript of A Critical Look at Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty"

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Campaign for Real Beauty: The Facts
Born out of Dove’s 2003 study called “The Real Truth About Beauty”
2004 - launched print and billboard ads
98%
do not think of themselves as beautiful
2006 - Released short film "Evolution"
featured women outside stereotypical beauty norms and asked the public to vote
3200 women interviewed...
<2% thought of themselves as beautiful
Where does Dove's Money Go?
What is Dove
Really
selling?

No actual Dove product is
pictured with the models.
Good advertisement=
Memorable image + Established superiority
Dove's memorable image?
"Real" women
Dove's superiority?
the presence of
those women
Dove still uses women's bodies to sell a product
2005 - Introduced iconic ad featuring six
“real women with real curves.”
Since the launch of the Campaign for Real Beauty,
Dove’s net profit has increased
by nearly $396 million
This suggests that
the models are
the product
subversion
iNFLECTiON
or
Who has the power?
humans
or
Objects
New forms of inclusion?
Or a new standard for exclusion?
promoting awareness about the insides of the beauty industry

using a more diverse set of models
selling women’s bodies, not their achievements or even Dove’s own products

condoning aspirations of Western beauty ideals

hiding behind the façade of a positive “self-esteem-building” ad campaign
But Dove, you are the beauty industry.
98%
do not think of themselves as beautiful
specifically to people who believe in
a diversification of beauty
Full transcript