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The Tables Turned by William Wordsworth Analysis

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Lorrie Yee

on 3 May 2013

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Transcript of The Tables Turned by William Wordsworth Analysis

The Tables Turned By William W rdsworth Presented By: Lorrie Yee Up! up! my Friend, and quit your books;
Or surely you'll grow double:
Up! up! my Friend, and clear your looks;
Why all this toil and trouble?

The sun above the mountain's head,
A freshening lustre mellow
Through all the long green fields has spread,
His first sweet evening yellow.

Books! 'tis a dull and endless strife:
Come, hear the woodland linnet,
How sweet his music! on my life,
There's more of wisdom in it.

And hark! how blithe the throstle sings!
He, too, is no mean preacher:
Come forth into the light of things,
Let Nature be your teacher.

She has a world of ready wealth,
Our minds and hearts to bless—
Spontaneous wisdom breathed by health,
Truth breathed by cheerfulness. One impulse from a vernal wood
May teach you more of man,
Of moral evil and of good,
Than all the sages can.

Sweet is the lore which Nature brings;
Our meddling intellect
Mis-shapes the beauteous forms of things:—

We murder to dissect.
Enough of Science and of Art;
Close up those barren leaves;
Come forth, and bring with you a heart
That watches and receives. BIO INFO Born in Great Britain (Lake District)
April 7, 1770
Graduated Cambridge University

Deeply moved by nature
Traveled to Germany but returned to England

Published Lyrical Ballads in 1798
Continued till 1850
Began Romantic Age in English Lit.
Truly expressed feelings and appreciate physical nature
Response to Industrial Revolution

Death by pleurisy (inflamed lungs)
April 23, 1850 Meaning Imagery You're gunna get fat, if you keep reading! Think natural, peaceful, perfect weather. Light is natural is knowledge. Personification the sun's rays health is the wisdom given by nature when you're happy you're honest repetitive

sharp sound

mimic reading Alliteration Wordsworth wants the readers to stop lazily sitting and reading! He encourages going out in nature in order to maximize learning. He believes that you learn the most from nature but, only if you open yourself up to watching and accepting what nature has to give to you.
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