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Chemistry 101 with Professor Fredricksen

Lesson 7 - Naming Ionic Compounds Special Guests: Russel, Dug and Kevin By: Alyssa Milano and Kathy Nghiem
by

Emily Kathy

on 10 October 2012

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Transcript of Chemistry 101 with Professor Fredricksen

Chemistry 101
with Professor Fredricksen Lesson 7 -
Naming Ionic Compounds By: Alyssa Milano and Kathy Nghiem
Course: SCH3U
Teacher: Daigle Bagel (the Leprechaun)
Date: October 10, 2012 There are two types of ionic
compounds in the IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) system. 1) Binary ionic compounds
contains only two different
elements. 2) Polyatomic ionic
compounds
contains a metal cation
and a polyatomic
ion. Follow me! Good afternoon, my name
is Russel and I am a
wilderness explorer.
What are you talking about? Well Russel, let me
explain on my handy
chalkboard. SQUIRREL !!! Steps to Success for Naming Regular
Binary Ionic Compounds:

1) Separate the two elements.

2) Cross over from bottom to top.

3) Add the charges.
REMEMBER: the first one (metal) is positive
and the second (non-metal) is negative.

4) Write the name of the element, the metal stays the same but the non-metal changes it's ending to "ide." So Russel, I'm guessing you still
don't understand ... let me give you
some examples. Example 1: Name the following ionic compound. Ba3N2 1) Separate the two elements. Ba3 Barium N2 Nitrogen
(metal) (non-metal) 2) Cross over from bottom to top. Ba3 N2 Ba2 N3 3)Add the charges.
REMEMBER: the first one (metal) is
positive and the second (non-mental)
is negative. Ba2+ N3- *** Make sure the charges match those found
in the periodic table. *** 4) Write the name, the metal stays the same
but the non-metal changes it's ending to "ide." Ba3N2

Barium nitride Professor Fredricksen!
I THINK I GET IT!! :D That is excellent to hear Russel,
but I'm afraid that there is much
more to learn. Oh yes, what Professor Fredricksen
just taught was naming ionic compounds
but there is still naming multivalent metals
in ionic compounds. ????????? That is right, Dug. With multivalent
metals, we write the oxidation number as a roman numeral and put it in brackets
after the name of the metal. NOTE: When both elements have
the same number but different charges,
the charge and number cancels out.
ex: Boron Phosphide -> B3+ P3- = BP Steps to Success for Naming Multivalent
Metals in Ionic Compounds:

1) Identify metal and non-metal.
REMINDER: CHECK PERIODIC TABLE.

2)Cross over the charges from bottom to top.

3)Write symbols and charges of each element.
REMINDER: CHECK PERIODIC TABLE.

4)Check the charge for the metal. The number will be written in
Roman numerals between the metal and non-metal names and add "ide" to the ending of the non-metal. The bracket system makes it very
easy to find the formulas of transition
metal compounds, since we are
given the oxidation number for the
metal ion! We only have to predict the
charge on the non-metal as usual, using
the periodic table. We then use the
crossover rule as usual to get the formula. ?????????? I know, Kevin. Its a lot a words
for you but don't worry. Let me
give you an example. Example 2: Name the following multivalent ionic compound. Fe2O3 Metal: Iron (Fe) Non-metal: Oxygen (O) 1) Identify the metal and non-metal by looking at the periodic table. 3) Write symbols and charges. REMINDER: CHECK PERIODIC TABLE. The rectangle displays where the transition metals are located on the periodic table. This is where most of the elements
that contains 2 charges are located. Fe2+/3+ O2- PROBLEM: IRON IS A TRANSITION METAL, THAT MEANS IT HAS 2 DIFFERENT CHARGES. SO WHICH ONE DO WE USE? PROCESS TO STEP 4. 2) Cross over charges from bottom to top. Fe203 Fe3 O2 4) Check the charge for the metal and the number will be written in Roman numerals between the metal and non-metal names and add "ide" to the ending of the non-metal. Since we confirmed that in the periodic table, iron (Fe) has the charge of 3+, we can know use it for this step. Fe3+ O2- iron (III) oxide Now gang, I hope you
understood this
lesson because we
are now going to have
a quiz. :O Binary ionic compounds:

1. Naming compound CaS: ?
BO: ?

2.Naming chemical formula Calcium phosphide: ?
Beryllium sulfide: ? Multivalent Metals:

1.Naming compound NiO: ?
CuCl2: ?

2. Naming chemical formulas: Gold (I) chloride: ?
Nickel (III) sulfide: ? Binary ionic compounds:

1.Naming compound
CaS: Calcium Sulfide
BO: Boron Oxide

2.Naming chemical formula
Calcium phosphide: Ca3P2
Beryllium sulfide: BeS ANSWERS Multivalent Metals:
1.Naming compound
NiO: Nickel (II) Oxide CuCl2: Copper (II) Chloride

2. Naming chemical formulas:
Gold (I) chloride: AuCl
Nickel (III) sulfide: Ni2S3 ANSWERS SMILE YOU JUST GRADUATED
FROM PROFESSOR FREDRICKSEN'S
CHEMISTRY 101 CLASS: LESSON 7! NOTE: When an element
has a charge of one it is
removed from the chemical formula.
ex: potassium chloride --> K1+ Cl1- = KCl
Full transcript