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Intersectionality

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Trula Nicholas

on 5 July 2014

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Transcript of Intersectionality

Intersectionality
"Social location 'refers to the relative amount of privilege and oppression that individuals possess on the basis of specific identity constructs, such as race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, and faith'" (Hulko, 2009, as cited in Van Herk, Smith, and Andrew, 2011, p. 30).
"Intersectionality, on the other hand, describes 'the entanglement of identity categories that make up an individual, the differential attributions of power that result from such varied configurations, and the need to view intersectional beings holistically rather than try to tease apart different strands of identity'" (Hulko, 2009, as cited in Van Herk et al., 2011, p. 30).
YouTube - Intersectionality
"Intersectionality incorporates multiple constructed identities such as sexuality, ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status and 'ableness' and is 'concerned with the ways in which constructed identities interact to shape multiple selves or dimensions of persons' (Cramer & Plummer, 2009, p. 163)" (Van Herk et al., 2011, p. 30).
Comes out of feminist theory....early writers:
Crenshaw, K. W. (1991). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, identity politics, and violence against women of color. Stanford Law Review, 43(6), 1241-1299.
Hancock, A. M. (2007). When multiplication doesn't equal quick addition. Perspectives on Politics, 5(1), 63-73.
McCall, L., (2005). The complexity of intersectionality. Signs, 30(3), 1771-1800.
Intersectionality and Marginalization within Feminism
Socially Constructed Identities
Race
Ethnicity
Sexual Identity (Orientation)
Gender
Socio-Economic Status
Ability
Intersectionality - The confluence of multiple identities in each individual" (Watts-Jones, 2010, p. 406).
Intersectionality - "the ways in which different inequalities intersect leading to unique forms of discrimination" (Kantola & Nousiainen, 2009, p. 460).
References
Covarrubias, A. (2011). Quantitative intersectionality: A critical race analysis of the Chicana/o educational pipline. Journal of Latinos and Education, 10(2), 86-105.

Crenshaw, K. W. (1991). Mapping the margins: Intersectionality, identity politics, and violence against women of color. Stanford Law Review, 43(6), 1241-1299.

Hancock, A. M. (2007). When multiplication doesn't equal quick addition. Perspectives on Politics, 5(1), 63-73.

Kantola, J., & Nousiainen, K. (2009). Institutionalizing intersectionality in Europe. International Feminist Journal of Politics, 11(4), 459-477.

McCall, L., (2005). The complexity of intersectionality. Signs, 30(3), 1771-1800.

Watts-Jones, D. (2010). Location of self: Opening the door to dialogue on intersectinality in the therapy process. Family Process, 49(3), 405-420.

Van Herk, K. A., Smith, D., & Andrew, C. (2010). Examining our privileges and oppressions: Incorporating an intersectionality paradigm to nursing. Nursing Inquiry, 18(1), 29-39.
Oppression Olympics
"Although it is widely recognized that these identity markers are historically and socially constructed, this does not negate the fact that they create uniquely lived experiences for people labeled by them, including creating disadvantage for some while privileging others" (Covarrubias, 2011, p. 88).
Covarrubias (2011) goes on to say that socially constructed identities

also intersect in people's daily lives so that they have the potential of simultaneously create privilege and oppressive conditions for the same individuals within different conditions. For example, a man of color can simultaneously be paid more for the same job that a woman of color may be paid for but much less than his White counterpart. Hence, there can be simultaneously oppressive and privileging conditions based on intersection of these systems. (p. 88)

A cisgender person is someone who identifies as they gender/sex they were assigned at birth. For example, your birth certificate says female, and you identify as a female woman.
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