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Catastrophe Theory

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by

Callum Macaulay

on 3 March 2016

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Transcript of Catastrophe Theory



Catastrophe theory
- Theory of
arousal
that predicts a
rapid decline
in performance resulting from the combination of
high cognitive
anxiety and
increasing somatic
anxiety
The performer then tries to
regain
control by
decreasing

arousal

Performance will
slowly

improve
as
arousal
and
anxiety
levels
decrease

Performance levels may continue to
deteriorate





The model proposes that performance is affected by the relationship between

somatic

(Physical)

anxiety and

cognitive

(Mental)

anxiety
Catastrophe Theory
Performer has a
low

somatic
anxiety before the event

Somatic
anxiety
builds


Somatic
anxiety
declines
as the event begins

If
somatic
anxiety
stays
or
increases
the performer may suffer a
catastrophic

decline
in performance as they literally "Fall-Apart".

BY:
Lauren BA
Ben W
Lauren W
Callum
Somatic
anxiety -
Physiological

Cognitive

anxiety -
Psychological
Catastrophe Theory concludes that if levels of
cognitive
anxiety are
high
and
somantic
anxiety is
low
then there will be an
increase
in peformance
Development of
inverted U
theory

Catastrophe
theory is more of a model than a theory

Attempts to predict human behaviour and performance rather than explaining how it occurs
If both
semantic
and
cognitive
anxiety are
high
performance can suddenly
deteriorate
Full transcript