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Shakespeare's Theatres

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Anna Krauß

on 20 January 2014

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Transcript of Shakespeare's Theatres

Shakespeare's Theatres
Stratford-upon-Avon
transmedialshakespeare.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/henrywriothesley1.jpg
theatresonline.com/theatres/stratford-upon-avon-theatres/swan-theatre/images/swan-theatre.jpg
Sources
changepromotions.com/3.0/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/rose-theatre-brampton-brampton-on.jpg
britannia.com/history/londonhistory/histrose.html
playshakespeare.com/study/elizabethan-theatres/2190-the-rose-theatre
writersinspire.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/maptheatres-2.png
Newington Butts
Swan Theatre
Curtain Theatre
Great Theatre
BULL INN
WHITE HART INN
INN YARDS
taken by Myriam
History
built in 1599
burned down in 1613 (misfired canon ball)
rebuilt in 1614 in octagon shape
ripped down in 1644 by the Puritans
1987: rebuilding in old shape
ELIZABETHAN THEATRES
FACTS
open theatre
5 levels at which an actor could appear
DESIGN
elizabethan-era.org.uk/architecture-of-elizabethan-theatres.htm
material:
wood, nails, stone, plaster, thatched roofs (later tiled roofs)
1,500 - 3,000 could fit into the theatres
open air arena,
called 'pit' or 'yard'
3 levels of roofed galleries balconies overlooking the back of the stage
the stage projected halfway into the 'pit'
sometimes artificial lighting to provide atmosphere for night scenes
no heating -> in winter plays are transferred to indoor playhouses
ih2.redbubble.net/work.2217493.2.flat,550x550,075,f.ceiling-of-shakespeares-globe-theatre-london.jpg
BROCKHAUS - *Shakespeare, *Globe Theater
SPECIAL EFFECTS
smoke
susanlake.net/publications/unit/content/images/globe.gif
fore-runners to Elizabethan Theatres
capacity: up to 500 people including thieves, prostitutes & pickpockets
sometimes bear baiting & gambling
movable platforms
at their peak between 1576 - 1594
some were converted to playhouses
Puritans disliked entertainment especially when they caused fights, disturbances & drinking of alcohol
1574 the City of London started regulating the Inn-yard activities
GEORGE INN
actors made their entrances
curtained alcove/ inner stage/ rear stage:
'Lord's rooms' :
best seats in the 'house' despite the poor view of the back of the actors
audience: good view of the Lords
immediately above stage wall on a balcony
'Gentlemen's rooms':
additional balconies on the left and right for rich patrons of the theater
interior scenes with properties (e.g. caves, studies, shops) were disclosed by opening the curtains
CROSS KEYS INN
BELL INN
revisionworld.co.uk/sites/default/files/rw_files/theatre.gif
BELL SAVAGE INN
musicians' gallery
hut
Globe Theatre
primary home of Shakespeare's acting company, called "The Lord Chamberlain's Men" (since late 1599)
scenery could not be changed between scenes
-> no curtain to drop
audience had to imagine scenery
Shakespeare joined the company in 1594
3 "privileged companies"-> granted patronage by the Royals
they became "The King's Men"
"Grooms of the Chamber"
-> prominence of Shakespeare's acting company
groseducationalmedia.ca/lcm.html
Rose Theatre
History
built in 1587
closed in 1642 by Cromwell
when the newer, bigger Globe opened near the tiny Rose, it went bankrupt
Globe's reconstruction = copy of the Rose
today: still some remains & museum
mckellen.com/writings/890520rose1.htm
History
built in 1594
fallen to decay in 1632
Blackfriars Theatre
built in 1596
private theatre (roof, indoor, wealthy people)
History
built in 1577
home of the Chamberlain's Men, before moving to the Globe in 1599
shenandoahliterary.org/snopes/files/2013/01/Blackfriars-Playhouse.jpg
built in 1576
primarily used by the Chamberlain's Men
1597: closed, not reopened
britannia.com/history/londonhistory/histrose.html
Fortune Theatre
built in 1600
destroyed by fire in 1621
rebuilt in brick (1st brick theatre) & reopened in 1623
1642: closed by Puritans
demolished in 1661
now marked by Playhouse Yard
taken by Myriam
taken by Myriam
by Myriam & Anna
britannica.com/shakespeare/article-9396030
After Shakespeare's death: his plays continued to be staged
Interregnum (1642-1660): most public stage performances banned by Puritan rulers
After the English Restoration (1660): his plays were performed in playhouses
- elaborate scenery
- music, dancing, thunder, lightning, wave machines, fireworks
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare_in_performance
History
built in 1580
1592: closed by the Privy Council because of a food riot
L.G. Salingar - The Elizabethan Literary Renaissance - The Pelican Guide to English Literature 2, London 1955, p.66-68
Anthony Burgess, Shakespeare, London 1970
How plays were presented on stage
little time for group rehearsals
actors were given the words of only their own parts
themes: usually mythological, allegorical, or symbolic & were designed to be complimentary to the noble or royal host
CONDITIONS OF PRODUCTION
dramas produced at court: more elaborate than those organized by the professional companies
adult companies
choir boys
group of choir boys
acting companies
12 to 25 adult men
young boys played the female roles
many of the main actors: shareholders in the company & received a share of the profits
conducted by a choirmaster (who received all profits)
performed in court chapels
2 main acting companies performed in London theatres:
just 2 or 3 characters in important scenes or 1 character who dominates a crowded stage
elizabethanenglandlife.com/
folger.edu/Content/Discover-Shakespeare/Shakespeares-Theater/Staging-and-Performance.cfm
britannica.com/shakespeare/article-9051282
Elizabethan acting companies: patronage of various nobles
to survive, acting companies had to perform often -> secure income
large repertory of plays to perform
-> to keep the limited amount of audience members coming back
-> otherwise they were referred to as "masterless men", classified as vagabonds or rogues
Admiral's Men
Lord Chamberlain's Men
~22 points of discovery or entrance
rsc.org.uk/visit-us/rst/
organizes Shakespeare- Festivals
founded in 1961 to honour Shakespeare
played in the Londoner Aldwych Theatre classic and modern pieces throughout the year
SWAN THEATRE
opened in 1986
favourite space for many actors, directors & audiences
belongs to the RSC
includes the
Victorian Gothic structure
deep thrust stage
modern lightning
sound technology
gallaried
includes a new over-stage flying capability today
ROYAL SHAKESPEARE THEATRE
(Shakespeare was born here)
ask.com/question/advantages-and-disadvantages-of-a-thrust-stage
phillipkay.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/2-trifaccia-dipinta-mask.jpg
Full transcript