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Copy of To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars

poem by Richard Lovelace
by

bre aaron

on 9 October 2012

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Transcript of Copy of To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars

To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars
By Richard Lovelace THE POEM Tell me not, Sweet, I am unkind,
That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase, 5
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such
As you too shall adore; 10
I could not love thee, Dear, so much,
Loved I not Honor more. THE POET War and Conflict Duty and Patriotism Devotion
and
Homage Romantic love
and Vexed love "Tell me not I am unkind,
That from...
thy chaste breast and quiet mind
To war and arms I fly." (1-4) "[A] new mistress now I chase,
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield." (5-8) "I could not love thee Dear so much,
[Loved] I not [Honor] more." (11-12) In the very first stanza, Lovelace mentions going off to war, and makes it apparent that this conflict of war is affecting his relationship with his lover negatively. Lovelace must uphold his duty and aid in conquering his country's enemy. He must show his patriotism with courage and strength by not only embracing the battlefield with powerful faith, but by leaving his loved ones with undying hope and belief that he will return to them safely. Although his love is angry with him, Lovelace tries to sympathize by explaining that he must fulfill his duty to England before he can be fully devoted to her. He holds his honor above all, but their love will be enough to overcome this obstacle. Analysis of the Poem To Lucasta, on Going to the Wars is constructed of three quatrain stanzas.

The author's tone is gentle as bids his love goodbye. He is apologetic, for she is angry with him for leaving so suddenly. His tone is also hopeful, though, for he has confidence that their love will conquer.

The mood of the poem is light-hearted and the reader gets the sense that Lovelace is attempting to ease the tension and downplay the gravity of the situation.

Lovelace made use of metaphors as a key literary device in this poem, displaying his love in a light of innocence and purity:
"from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind" (2-3).
Another comparison made is between war and a mistress, to emphasize that his love does not approve of his going off to war:
"True, a new mistress now I chase,
The first foe in the field" (5-6). Presented by:
Bre Aaron
Kayla Thompson our connection is to the movie dear john. page 317 “I finally understood what true love meant...
love meant that you care for another person's happiness more than your own, no matter how painful the choices you face might be.” - dear john
Full transcript