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User-Centered Design (UCD)

A brief overview of UCD and examples of how UCD can be integrated into common project management methodologies.
by

Faye Hoffman

on 16 June 2014

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Transcript of User-Centered Design (UCD)

User-Centered Design (UCD)
What is UCD?

Early focus on users and tasks
Structured and systematic information gathering
Trained facilitator data collection/business
process sessions

Measurement and testing of product usage
Focus on ease of learning and ease of use
Testing of prototypes with actual users

Iterative Design
Product designed, modified and tested repeatedly
Allow for the complete overhaul and rethinking of design
by early testing of conceptual models and design ideas
Core UCD Principles

UCD in the project
UCD is a process and the process is
iterative
Discussion
Clarification?
Concerns?
Pain points for integrating UCD?
UCD Benefits
Easy-to-use products
Satisfied customers
Decreased expenditures on technical support and training
Demonstrable ease-of-use successes
Ultimately increased market share (or in our case, client satisfaction)
UCD cuts costs and increases
user satisfaction
and
productivity
.
UCD results in:
Determining the environment, intended users, comparative systems

Demographics (identify user groups - clients/customers)
Usage habits (What/why are they using system - business processes)
Competitor solutions (Comparative analysis - business opportunities)
A commitment to understand and involve the user is essential. If you want a user to understand your product, you must first understand the user (we are not our users).
1. Set business goals
2. Understand users
Everything a user sees, hears and touches is designed to satisfy user's needs.

Easy to complete primary tasks
Useful
Productive
Engaging
Easy to set up
Easy to learn - intuitive

3. Design the total user experience
User feedback is gathered early and often, using prototypes of widely ranging fidelity. The feedback drives design and development.

One-on-one testing
User surveys
Low and high-fidelity prototypes
Iterative design

4. Evaluate designs
Requirements gathering:
Understanding and specifying the context of use

Specification:
Specifying the user and organizational requirements

Design:
Producing designs and prototypes

Evaluation:
Carrying out user-based assessment of the solution
UCD in the project
User Centered Design
in the Waterfall methodology
Requirements
Design
Code
Launch
Test
Elicitation/facilitation
User research
Competitive review
Information architecture
Usability planning
Prototype development
Expert review
Usability testing
UCD in the project
User Centered Design

in the Agile methodology
Analyze
Plan
Deploy
Design
Build
Test
Elicitation/facilitation
User research
Competitive review
Information architecture


Usability planning
Prototype development
Expert review
Usability testing
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Presentation Goals
Help to create a common understanding of UCD and how it can fit into our project processes so if there is the opportunity to incorporate it, we will know how and when (people, tools, processes).

Define UCD and describe its goals, benefits & principles

Provide examples of how/where UCD activities can fit within Waterfall and Agile methodologies

Open the room up for questions and discussion




Requirements
Elicitation/facilitation
Traditional group sessions
User story generation sessions
One-on-one end user interviews
User research
Story sessions (Directed focus groups)
User surveys
Competitive review
Other systems (internal & external)
Existing research
Design
Information architecture
Content analysis
Wireframe diagramming
Interaction prototyping
Usability planning
Identify users/user groups
Identify one-on-one inquiry areas
& questions
Create user survey
Code
Prototype development
Work with developer to have areas of the solution built out that are to be tested
Test
Usability testing
One-on-one prototype testing
with end users
User survey
Expert review
Heuristic analysis (compare the solution against accepted usability principles.)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Interaction prototyping
Identify one-on-one inquiry areas & questions
Heuristic analysis
One-on-one usability testing
Wireframing
Work Breakdown Structure
1.
2.
3.
4.
Usability planning
Expert review
Usability testing
Deliverable examples
Requirements
Design
Code
Test
Deliverable examples
Sprint activities
User-centered design (UCD) is a process (not restricted to interfaces or technologies) in which the needs, wants, and limitations of end users of a product, service or process are given extensive attention at each stage of the design process.

The primary goal of UCD is to create products that users find
useful
and
usable
.
Tasks
Workflow
Tools
Problems
Environment
Full transcript