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spatial relationship

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tina patel

on 11 November 2012

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Transcript of spatial relationship

Nucleus or Centralized
Linear
Radial
Clustered or Modular
Grid A series of spaces with a direct, common link Order of importance
Implies that in most if not all architectural compositions, difference exist among their forms and spaces
Difference reflects the degree of importance of these forms and spaces, the functional, formal, symbolic roles they play in an organization
Space and form to be articulated as being important or significant to an organization, must be uniquely visible Hierarchy Grid can go through dimensional transformation to accommodate specific requirements or accommodate circulation
Or Portion of the grid can be dislocated or rotated about a point in the basic pattern
This creates hierarchical set of modules differentiated by size, proportions, and location Grid Organization Grid is created by two sets of parallel lines are laid perpendicular or at an axis to each other
Creates equal, repetitive units of spaces
Spaces create positive forms and negative spaces
Since grid consists of repetitive, modular units of space, it can subtract from or added and still maintain its identity Grid Organization Characteristics of clustered/modular organization:
Examples, Ching, previous slide Modular or clustered organization Combination of centralized and linear organization
Consists of a dominant central space from which a number of linear organizations extend in a radial manner
Extroverted plan
Example: airports
Examples-Ching, pg 217-221 Radial Organization Ching, pg 195 Spatial Organization Various ways to organize spaces of a building:
Relative importance, functional and symbolic role in the organization Spatial Organization Basic ways the spaces of the building are related to one another and organized into coherent patterns of form and space are:
Enveloped Spaces- space within a space
Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces-field of space overlapping the volume of another space
Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces-next to each other
Transitional Spaces- space linked by a common space Spatial relationships Buildings rarely consists of one solitary space
Number of spaces
Relate to one another by:
Function
Proximity and/or
Path of movement
Study how spaces are related to one another and organized into a coherent pattern of form and space Spatial Relationships The most important and complex element in design theory and application

May be real or perceived- example in this classroom- What is real and what is perceived?

Think beyond the setting of the classroom?
Include school, college, university, city, state …… What is Space? SPATIAL RELATIONSHIP AND ORGANIZATION Objectives:
Text Book:
Jones and Allen: Chapter: 3
Ching: Chapter: 4 Discuss with your neighbor
What did you not follow
What did you learn Relationships & Organization Enveloped Spaces
Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces
Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces
Transitional Spaces Small space within a space; spaces relate by function location and circulation Nucleus or Centralized
Linear
Radial
Clustered or Modular
Grid A repetitive system of units that can be the same or even different sizes This visual emphasis can be achieved by endowing form and shape with:
Exceptional size
Unique shape
A strategic location
Architectural composition can have secondary focal point besides primary which create visual accents
When everything is emphasized, nothing is emphasized Hierarchy Grid Organization Consists of number of secondary spaces grouped around a large, dominant, central space
Example--rotunda
The secondary spaces may be or may not be equivalent to one another in function, form, and size
Circulation and movement within a centralized organization may be radial, loop, or spiral in form
Usually a stable, concentrated composition Nucleus or Centralized organization More examples: Refer to Ching, 189 Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Small space is contained in a larger space
easily accommodated
Smaller space depends on larger space for its relationship with exterior environment Enveloped spaces Line
Shape
Form and Mass
Texture
Time What is space? Vertical planes
Walls
Horizontal planes
Ceilings
Floors
Furniture
Finishes Interior Space is defined or enclosed by: Hierarchy Consists of repetitive, cellular spaces, similar in functions and visual traits such as shape or orientation Modular or clustered organization Radial Organization Visual separation by an opening Example:
Examples in Ching, pg. 191 Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces Two spaces overlap and there is an emergence of a zone of shared space
Each space retains its identity and definition of space Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Consists of Series of spaces
These spaces are directly related or linked through a separate and distinct linear space
Repetitive spaces are usually alike in size, form and function
Functionally and symbolically important space are emphasized by size, form or location:
End of a linear sequence
Offset
At pivotal points Linear Organization Nucleus or Centralized organization One-half house, John Hejduk For examples refer to Ching, Chapter 4 Example- Hallways, courtyards, atrium etc Transitional spaces To a designer space is essence of what our manmade and natural environments are all about

Cornerstone of the elements What is space? Two spaces are linked or related to each other by a third, intermediate space
Visual and spatial relationship of the two spaces depends on the nature of third space
Intermediate space can differ in orientation than the two spaces being linked Transitional Spaces Glass house-Philip Johnson
Moore House Enveloped Space Endless entity until it is defined or enclosed What is space? Bernard Tschumi- Follies -Paris House III- Peter Eisenman For examples refer to Ching, Chapter 4 Manipulation of grid Grid Arrangement Express direction and movement
Flexible
Curve or segmented forms- tends to enclose the space
Examples, Ching, pg. 206-215 Linear Organization Intermediate space can be residual in nature and be determined solely by the forms and orientations of the two spaces being linked Transitional Spaces Example: Skyway system Intermediate space can become linear in form
and link two space which are distant from each other
or join a series of spaces Transitional Spaces Intermediate space
Can be equivalent in size, shape and form a linear sequence of spaces Transitional Spaces Intermediate space can (if large enough)
become the dominate space
Capable of organizing a number of space around it Transitional Spaces Spaces are side by side
Most common type of spatial relationship
Allows for clearly defined spaces-functionally and symbolically
Degree of visual and spatial continuity depends on nature of the plane that separates and binds these spaces Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces Interlocking portion of two volumes can be shared by each space Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Interlocking portion can merge with one of the spaces and become an integral part of its volume Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Plan View Relationship between small and large spaces
Smaller space changes in size and/or function, larger space will lose its impact
If smaller space continues to grow the separation would be merely a layer or skin
Smaller space may have same shape with different orientation
Smaller space may have a different shape Enveloped Space Interlocking portion can develop its own space identity Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces LEVEL CHANGE The separating plane may:
Limited visual and physical access
Door or small opening between
Freestanding plane in a single volume of space
Partition not to ceiling
Defined by row of columns
Implied by change
in level
contrast in surface materials
texture Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces Repetitive system of units
Spaces organized within the field of a structural grid or other 3-D Framework Grid Organization Enveloped Spaces
Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces
Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces
Transitional Spaces Small space within a space; spaces relate by function location and circulation Nucleus or Centralized
Linear
Radial
Clustered or Modular
Grid A series of spaces with a direct, common link This visual emphasis can be achieved by endowing form and shape with:
Exceptional size
Unique shape
A strategic location
Architectural composition can have secondary focal point besides primary which create visual accents
When everything is emphasized, nothing is emphasized Hierarchy Order of importance
Implies that in most if not all architectural compositions, difference exist among their forms and spaces
Difference reflects the degree of importance of these forms and spaces, the functional, formal, symbolic roles they play in an organization
Space and form to be articulated as being important or significant to an organization, must be uniquely visible Hierarchy Grid Organization Grid can go through dimensional transformation to accommodate specific requirements or accommodate circulation
Or Portion of the grid can be dislocated or rotated about a point in the basic pattern
This creates hierarchical set of modules differentiated by size, proportions, and location Grid Organization Grid is created by two sets of parallel lines are laid perpendicular or at an axis to each other
Creates equal, repetitive units of spaces
Spaces create positive forms and negative spaces
Since grid consists of repetitive, modular units of space, it can subtract from or added and still maintain its identity Grid Organization Characteristics of clustered/modular organization:
Examples, Ching, previous slide Modular or clustered organization Consists of number of secondary spaces grouped around a large, dominant, central space
Example--rotunda
The secondary spaces may be or may not be equivalent to one another in function, form, and size
Circulation and movement within a centralized organization may be radial, loop, or spiral in form
Usually a stable, concentrated composition Nucleus or Centralized organization Various ways to organize spaces of a building:
Relative importance, functional and symbolic role in the organization Spatial Organization Buildings rarely consists of one solitary space
Number of spaces
Relate to one another by:
Function
Proximity and/or
Path of movement
Study how spaces are related to one another and organized into a coherent pattern of form and space Spatial Relationships The most important and complex element in design theory and application

May be real or perceived- example in this classroom- What is real and what is perceived?

Think beyond the setting of the classroom?
Include school, college, university, city, state …… What is Space? SPATIAL RELATIONSHIP AND ORGANIZATION Discuss with your neighbor
What did you not follow
What did you learn Relationships & Organization Nucleus or Centralized
Linear
Radial
Clustered or Modular
Grid A repetitive system of units that can be the same or even different sizes Hierarchy Consists of repetitive, cellular spaces, similar in functions and visual traits such as shape or orientation Modular or clustered organization Radial Organization Combination of centralized and linear organization
Consists of a dominant central space from which a number of linear organizations extend in a radial manner
Extroverted plan
Example: airports
Examples-Ching, pg 217-221 Radial Organization Small space is contained in a larger space
easily accommodated
Smaller space depends on larger space for its relationship with exterior environment Enveloped spaces Basic ways the spaces of the building are related to one another and organized into coherent patterns of form and space are:
Enveloped Spaces- space within a space
Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces-field of space overlapping the volume of another space
Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces-next to each other
Transitional Spaces- space linked by a common space Spatial relationships Line
Shape
Form and Mass
Texture
Time What is space? Vertical planes
Walls
Horizontal planes
Ceilings
Floors
Furniture
Finishes Interior Space is defined or enclosed by: Ching, pg 195 Spatial Organization More examples: Refer to Ching, 189 Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Two spaces overlap and there is an emergence of a zone of shared space
Each space retains its identity and definition of space Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces To a designer space is essence of what our manmade and natural environments are all about

Cornerstone of the elements What is space? Consists of Series of spaces
These spaces are directly related or linked through a separate and distinct linear space
Repetitive spaces are usually alike in size, form and function
Functionally and symbolically important space are emphasized by size, form or location:
End of a linear sequence
Offset
At pivotal points Linear Organization Nucleus or Centralized organization Visual separation by an opening Example:
Examples in Ching, pg. 191 Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces Glass house-Philip Johnson
Moore House Enveloped Space One-half house, John Hejduk For examples refer to Ching, Chapter 4 Example- Hallways, courtyards, atrium etc Transitional spaces Intermediate space
Can be equivalent in size, shape and form a linear sequence of spaces Transitional Spaces Bernard Tschumi- Follies -Paris House III- Peter Eisenman For examples refer to Ching, Chapter 4 Manipulation of grid Grid Arrangement Express direction and movement
Flexible
Curve or segmented forms- tends to enclose the space
Examples, Ching, pg. 206-215 Linear Organization Intermediate space can be residual in nature and be determined solely by the forms and orientations of the two spaces being linked Transitional Spaces Intermediate space can (if large enough)
become the dominate space
Capable of organizing a number of space around it Transitional Spaces Two spaces are linked or related to each other by a third, intermediate space
Visual and spatial relationship of the two spaces depends on the nature of third space
Intermediate space can differ in orientation than the two spaces being linked Transitional Spaces Endless entity until it is defined or enclosed What is space? Interlocking portion of two volumes can be shared by each space Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Example: Skyway system Intermediate space can become linear in form
and link two space which are distant from each other
or join a series of spaces Transitional Spaces Spaces are side by side
Most common type of spatial relationship
Allows for clearly defined spaces-functionally and symbolically
Degree of visual and spatial continuity depends on nature of the plane that separates and binds these spaces Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces Interlocking portion can merge with one of the spaces and become an integral part of its volume Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Interlocking portion can develop its own space identity Interlaced or Interlocking Spaces Plan View Relationship between small and large spaces
Smaller space changes in size and/or function, larger space will lose its impact
If smaller space continues to grow the separation would be merely a layer or skin
Smaller space may have same shape with different orientation
Smaller space may have a different shape Enveloped Space LEVEL CHANGE The separating plane may:
Limited visual and physical access
Door or small opening between
Freestanding plane in a single volume of space
Partition not to ceiling
Defined by row of columns
Implied by change
in level
contrast in surface materials
texture Juxtaposed or Adjacent Spaces Repetitive system of units
Spaces organized within the field of a structural grid or other 3-D Framework Grid Organization what is a space
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