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The Fox and the Stork

A school project.
by

Kiera Young

on 21 May 2013

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Transcript of The Fox and the Stork

By Kiera Young Shallow Dish and Narrow Jar Example The theme of this story is, "Do not play tricks on your neighbors unless you can stand the same treatment yourself." Using the same quote used under allusion... Ex: The story is a non-fiction, fantasy. 3 This theme can also be considered as the resolution (denouement), as an allusion, and an archetype. Ex: Exposition
Setting
Conflict
Rising action
Climax
Falling action
Resolution/ Denouement Exposition: Fox has an idea to trick the stork because he finds him amusing.
Setting: during dinner Rising action: Fox invites Stork to dine with him and decides to serve soup in a shallow dish. Stork, because of the shallow dish, could only wet the tip of his beak. Afterwords, the angry stork invites the fox to dine with him. Climax: The fox arrives only to find that he was fooled by his own trick. Falling action: Fox lost his temper, but the stork stayed calm. Resolution/ Denouement: The stork responds to Fox saying, "Do not play tricks on your neighbors unless you can stand the same treatment yourself." In the story, the author's purpose is... To give a lesson about how to treat others. Considering that it is what the very last phrase concludes with, I do believe that this is all the author wishes to say. Ex: Personification "The Fox one day thought of a plan to amuse himself at the expense of the Stork, at whose odd appearance he was always laughing." "... dine with me today," he said to the Stork smiling to himself..." "For dinner, the Fox served soup." "... Stork served a fish dinner that had a very appetizing smell." Ex: Stork: flat/ static
Fox: flat/ static I do not believe there was much room in the story to change the characters from where they started, and they were very simple characters. Ex: "Do not play tricks on your neighbors unless you can stand the same treatment yourself." It is a reference to the Golden Rule: "Treat others the way you would like to be treated." It is a very common idea in many cultures Conflict: Starts when the Fox makes a calculated decision to play a trick on the Stork Ex: The Fox, as a symbol, is sly, wise, sneaky, and cunning

The Stork is known for carrying children in white cloth No where does the stork symbolize wisdom or cunning, so why did the fox lose his temper while the stork taught the lesson? I have no idea why the three is here, I tried my best to get rid of it. Most imagery in the story revolves around sight. ...very shallow dish... ...wet the tip of his bill. ...made a great show of enjoyment. ...served in a tall jar with a very narrow neck. ...long bill... The style is... Simple Not very elaborate A serious tone Not too wordy... No difficult words to understand. It is difficult to tell who the protagonists and antagonists are. I believe the Fox is the protagonist. He was introduced first. The Stork I would believe to be the antagonist. As he was introduced to the story second. However, they are both important characters, and the Fox is against the Stork. It might even be the other way around. The Fox and the Stork
by Aesop
The Fox one day thought of a plan to amuse himself at the expense of the Stork, at whose odd appearance he was always laughing.
"You must come and dine with me today," he said to the Stork, smiling to himself at the trick he was going to play. The Stork gladly accepted the invitation and arrived in good time and with a very good appetite.
For dinner the Fox served soup. But it was set out in a very shallow dish, and all the Stork could do was to wet the very tip of his bill. Not a drop of soup could he get. But the Fox lapped it up easily, and, to increase the disappointment of the Stork, made a great show of enjoyment.
The hungry Stork was much displeased at the trick, but he was a calm, even-tempered fellow and saw no good in flying into a rage. Instead, not long afterward, he invited the Fox to dine with him in turn. The Fox arrived promptly at the time that had been set, and the Stork served a fish dinner that had a very appetizing smell. But it was served in a tall jar with a very narrow neck. The Stork could easily get at the food with his long bill, but all the Fox could do was to lick the outside of the jar, and sniff at the delicious odor. And when the Fox lost his temper, the Stork said calmly:
Do not play tricks on your neighbors unless you can stand the same treatment yourself. Characters Author's Purpose Allusion Plot Genre Theme The Fox and the Stork Literary Terms a subject of discourse, discussion, meditation, or composition; topic a class or category of artistic endeavor having a particular form, content, technique, or the like the plan, scheme, or main story of a literary or dramatic work, as a play, novel, or short story the reason for why the author wrote the written work the aggregate of features and traits that form the individual nature of some person or thing a passing or casual reference; an incidental mention of something, either directly or by implication Archetype Irony Imagery an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been, expected, or the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning the formation of mental images, figures, or likenesses of things, or of such images collectively Figurative Language Style/ Tone Protagonist/ Antagonist speech or writing that departs from literal meaning in order to achieve a special effect or meaning Style: a distinctive, formal, or characteristic manner of expression in words, music, painting, etc Tone: general aspect, quality, or style Protagonist: the leading character Antagonist: the force that opposes the protagonist
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