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Lewis Carroll

Poetry Presentation for 8C
by

Dan Metcalf

on 25 May 2011

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Transcript of Lewis Carroll

Lewis Carroll Is a pen-name for Charles Lutwidge Dodgeson He was an Anglican deacon, English author, mathematician, logician and a photographer His most famous novels are, 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland', and,'Through the Looking Glass' The poems I am going to talk about are as follows:The Crocodile, JABBERWOCKEY And... The Hunting of the Snark This poem is about
5000 words!!!
Born on the 27th of January
1832 Home Life
During his early youth, young Dodgson was educated at home. His "reading lists" preserved in the family archives testify to a precocious intellect: at the age of seven the child was reading The Pilgrim's Progress.
He also suffered from a stammer — a condition shared by his siblings — that often influenced his social life throughout his years. At age twelve he was sent away to a small private school at nearby Richmond (now part of Richmond School). Scholastically, though, he excelled with apparent ease. "I have not had a more promising boy his age since I came to Rugby", observed R.B. Mayor, the Mathematics master. Rugby
In 1846, young Dodgson moved on to Rugby School, where he was evidently less happy, for as he wrote some years after leaving the place:

I cannot say ... that any earthly considerations would induce me to go through my three years again ... I can honestly say that if I could have been ... secure from annoyance at night, the hardships of the daily life would have been comparative trifles to bear Scholastically, though, he excelled with apparent ease. "I have not had a more promising boy his age since I came to Rugby", observed R.B. Mayor, the Mathematics master Oxford
He left Rugby at the end of 1849 and, after an interval that remains unexplained, went on in January 1851 to Oxford, attending his father's old college, Christ Church. He had been at Oxford only two days when he received a summons home. His mother had died of "inflammation of the brain" — perhaps meningitis or a stroke — at the age of forty-seven. His early academic career veered between high promise and irresistible distraction. He did not always work hard, but was exceptionally gifted and achievement came easily to him.
In 1852 he received a First in Honours Mathematics, and was shortly thereafter nominated to a Studentship by his father's old friend, Canon Edward Pusey. A little later he failed an important scholarship through his self-confessed inability to apply himself to study. Even so, his talent as a mathematician won him the Christ Church Mathematical Lectureship, which he continued to hold for the next twenty-six years. The income was good, but the work bored him. Many of his pupils were older and richer than he was, and almost all of them were uninterested. Despite early unhappiness, Dodgson was to remain at Christ Church, in various capacities, until his death Jabberwocky Read in two different versions Normal Man Johnny Depp in the movie
This poem is about a man telling his son about a mythical 'dragon' like creature who is very destructive. Then the son goes and kills the beast Jabberwockey is a very
nonsenense like poem as
well. It uses archaeic
language and is hard to understand
THE NEXT POEM IS... The Crocodile Another Nonsense poem It is about a crocodile in the Nile on a sunny day. He is opening his mouth for the fishes to swim in I actually learnt this poem in America HOW doth the little crocodile
Improve his shining tail,
And pour the waters of the Nile
On every golden scale!

How cheerfully he seems to grin!
How neatly spread his claws,
And welcomes little fishes in
With gently smiling jaws! This poem gives good imagery... Death: 14th January 1898 He has lived in Japan, UK, USA and New Zealand The Novels by Carroll include many in the mathematical sense A Syllabus of Plane Algebraic Geometry (1860)
The Fifth Book of Euclid Treated Algebraically (1858 and 1868)
An Elementary Treatise on Determinants, With Their Application to Simultaneous Linear Equations and Algebraic Equations
Euclid and his Modern Rivals (1879), both literary and mathematical in style
Symbolic Logic Part I
Symbolic Logic Part II (published posthumously)
The Game of Logic
Some Popular Fallacies about Vivisection
Curiosa Mathematica I (1888)
Curiosa Mathematica II (1892)
The Theory of Committees and Elections, collected, edited, analyzed, and published in 1958, by Duncan Black

He also spent time with John Tenniel Who is an artist like
Carroll himself He drew a lot for Alice in Wonderland He died of influenza BY DAN IMAGERY S Pink writing = describing the croc P A B

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D `Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.




"Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
The frumious Bandersnatch!"


He took his vorpal sword in hand:
Long time the manxome foe he sought --
So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
And stood awhile in thought.


And, as in uffish thought he stood,
The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
And burbled as it came!


One, two! One, two! And through and through
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
He left it dead, and with its head
He went galumphing back.


"And, has thou slain the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!'
He chortled in his joy.




`Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe.



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B "It was evening, and the active badgers
were scratching and making holes in the hill-side,
all unhappy were the parrots
and the moaning turtles squeaked out." Archaeic Beware the 'Jabberwock' my son,
The jaws that will bite you, the claws that will catch you
Beware of the 'jubjub' bird and stay away
From the furious 'Bandersnatch' He grabbed hold of his lethal sword
He spent a long time seeking his menacing enemy,
So he rested by the 'Tumtum' tree
And stood for a while and thought. And as he was in a trance of thinking,
The Jabberwock with evil eyes
Came marching through the dark wood
And cried out as it came. One, two, one two the lethal blade made a snickersnack noise
And killed it and came back galloping on his horse. Have you killed the Jabberwock?
Come to my arms my brave and wonderful boy
O fabulous day! HipHip Hooray!
The father sang in his joy. "It was evening, and the active badgers
were scratching and making holes in the hill-side,
all unhappy were the parrots
and the moaning turtles squeaked out." Black
writing is
the translation In Guilford, Surrey
14th Jan. 1898. Alice Liddell was the inspiration for Carroll's books as he was a tutor to her HE WAS A BACHELOR There was some speculation of Carroll and his love of children especially the Liddell family and of course, Alice. BRILLIG means 4'o clock at the after noon which is the time for boiling dinner.

GYRE is a swirling, twisting

GIMBLE is to dig

WABE is grass plot around a sundial

MIMSY is a mix of flimsy and miserable THANK YOU FOR WATCHING MY PREZI
Full transcript