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Skin Cancer Prevention Presentatio

Vanessa Rock for Notre Dame University April 2013

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Transcript of Skin Cancer Prevention Presentatio

GOAL
Skin Cancer Prevention

Vanessa Rock
Skin Cancer Prevention Manager

Changing
behavior
Addressing
public policy
Influencing key
settings
Reduce incidence and mortality by reducing the exposure of the general population to UV radiation.
Why?
Incidences
Mortality
What?
Campaigns
How?
Evaluation
What is skin cancer?
Types of skin cancer
Personal Characteristics
Lifestyle
Environmental
Factors
Risk Factors
Leads to skin aging and DNA damage
UVA
Causes skin reddening and sunburn
UVB
Most dangerous but blocked by the ozone layer
UVC
Geographic
Location
Reflection
Ultraviolet radiation in Australia
Altitude
Time of day
Season
Cloud Cover
Why do we lead the world?
Intensity of UV radiation
Most of the Australian population has fair skin
Social values
Lifestyle, work and recreation habits
Australia has the highest rates of melanoma and other skin cancer in the world.
2000 Australians died in 2011
1 in 17 risk being diagnosed by 85
In NSW, 5 year survival for the period of 2002-2006: 89% for males and 93% for females.
Two types: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma BCC)
Over 750,000 new cases of NMSC diagnosed in Australia yearly
Estimated cost of treatment $626.8million in 2015
Pattern of hazard exposure and risk
Health promotion program design
Effect of case finding
Change in population phenotype through migration
Sun protection campaigns- central messages
Target groups: Children, adolescents, men 50+
Degree of risk- adolescents
Incidence of skin cancer- men 50+
Potential benefit- children
Mass Media Campaigns
Unpaid media promotion
Settings and target based strategies
Digital and social media
Sun protection campaigns-
marketing strategies
Social Marketing Framework
Application of commercial marketing principles (the ‘Ps’) to influence a target audience for the benefit of individuals or society
Audience segmentation
Product
Price
Place
Promotion

Social Marketing Framework
Improved sun protection
SunSound jingle

Product:
Price:
Use sun protection
Friendly reminder

Place:
Beaches, pools, sports grounds, festivals
Promotion:
Signage, media coverage, radio ads, website
People:
Local government staff
Results:
41% recalled the SunSound
38% reported use of additional sun protection
Recalled SunSound- 3x more likely to use sunscreen
10 SunSmart recommendations
Environment:
Scheduling outdoor activities
Using shade
Behavior:
Slip, slop, slap and slide
Education:
Information to school community
Role models
Curriculum resources
Program evaluation
Results strongly demonstrate SunSmart membership resulted in an increased proportion of schools with a written sun protection policy, and better sun protection measures
Advocacy
Provision of shade in public places
Tax deductions for sun protection products for outdoor workers
Ban of solaria

Need for sun protection
Vitamin D
Safety of sunscreen
Consequences
of skin cancer
Confusion and mixed messaging
The social marketing model works
Sustained campaign required
Comprehensive multi-channel marketing strategy needed
Knowledge, attitudes and behavior disconnected
Filtering and misinterpretation of information
Competing authorities and messages dilute response
Continuous monitoring, and redesign of key messages
Take home messages
Sun protection literacy to supplement simple messages
Vitamin D adequacy and stakeholders
Staples MP, Elwood M, Burton RC, et al. Non-melanoma skin cancer in Australia: the 2002 national survey and trends since 1985. Med J Aust 2006;184:6-10

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Non-melanoma skin cancer: general practice consultations, hospitalisation and mortality. Canberra: AIHW; 2008.
Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). Causes of Death 2009. Canberra: Commonwealth of Australia; 2011.

Tracey E et al. Cancer in NSW: Incidence and Mortality Report 2008. Sydney, NSW: Cancer Institute NSW; 2010.

Volkov A, Dobbinson S. 2010–11 National Sun Protection Survey: Report 2. Australians’ sun protective behaviours and sunburn incidence on summer weekends, 2010–11 and comparison with 2003–04 and 2006-07. An unpublished report prepared for National Skin Cancer Committee, Cancer Council Australia.

Sharplin G, Smith A, & Roth F. The national survey of Australian primary schools’ sun protection policy and practices: Evaluating the National SunSmart Schools Program. Cancer Council SA: Adelaide, 2012
References
Age and gender
Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC)
Melanoma
Why do melanoma trends differ between male and female?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Why do melanoma trends differ between male and female?
1. Acceptable for men to wear less clothing
2. Females more aware of aging
3. Females often primary carers of children
4. Females more familiar with their skin
5. Females see their GP more regularly
Full transcript