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E-Learning & Instructional Design

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Dennis Large

on 12 January 2013

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Transcript of E-Learning & Instructional Design

E-Learning & Instructional Design A Concept Map for This Week's Readings
Dennis Large Chapter 29: E-Learning and Instructional Design
J.V. Dempsey & Richard N. Van Eck Definition Characteristics Approaches Influences Standards Design exemplars for synchronous e-learning: A design theory approach
Hrastinski, Keller & Carlsson Need Development Exemplars Conclusions Definition:
E-learning includes all learning involving technology without distinctions for model, process, or approach. Characteristics: Instructional design for e-learning includes a functional architecture with various collaborative and interactive components. Characteristics: Instructional design for e-learning also includes technics - activities or strategies which target the specific learning outcomes. Approaches:
Elemental Learning focuses on authentic, conceptualized tasks as they occur in the real world. Elemental learning combined with functional architecture and technics support a constructed experience. Influences:
Method and media each help shape learning outcomes. However, neither exclusively influences long-term learning in a balanced design. Standards:
The field of instructional design and e-learning is very complex. Developing professional standards and/or certifications would help maintain the integrity of the field. Need:
To date, most research about computer-mediated communication has focused on asynchronous communication. The rapid rise of e-learning creates an urgency for research on synchronous communication. Exemplars:
Use synchronous e-learning to support strong group-wide relations
Use synchronous e-learning to support weak class-wide relations
Use synchronous e-learning for task support
Use synchronous e-learning for social support Design Exemplar #1: Use synchronous e-learning to support strong group-wide relations:
Learners respond more quickly and with more commitment
Perceived participation is high
High number of learners increases confusion and lowers participation Design Exemplar #2: Use synchronous e-learning to support weak class-wide relations:
Enables weak ties among learners
Weak ties generate sharing of more diverse resources, however . . .
Less frequent contact
Decreased cognitive effort Design Exemplar #3: Use synchronous e-learning for task support:
Learners choose synchronous tools for task support relations
Learners spend more time exchanging task support in synchronous setting Design Exemplar #4: Use synchronous e-learning for social support:
Increases in social support exchanges for some learners
Older learners felt the opposite was true
Learners appreciate the immediate feedback and social presence of a synchronous discussion References:
Dempsey, J.V. & Van Eck, R. N. (2010). E-learning and instructional design. In     Reiser, R. & Dempsey, J. Editors, Trends and issues in instructional design and technology (pp. 281-289). Boston, MA: Pearson Education
Hrastinski, S., Keller, C., & Carlsson, S. A. (2010). Design exemplars for synchronous e-learning: A design theory approach. Computers & Education, 55(2), 652-662.
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