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Julius Caesar Speech Analysis

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by

Leah Franklin

on 2 May 2014

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Transcript of Julius Caesar Speech Analysis

Julius Caesar Speech Analysis
Brutus
Act II, Scene 1, lines 10-34
Calpurnia
Act II, Scene 2, lines 13-26
Caesar, I never stood on ceremonies,
Yet now they fright me. There is one within,
Besides the things that we have heard and seen,
Recounts most horrid sights seen by the watch.
A lioness hath whelpèd in the streets,
And graves have yawned and yielded up their dead.
Fierce fiery warriors fought upon the clouds
In ranks and squadrons and right form of war,
Which drizzled blood upon the Capitol.
The noise of battle hurtled in the air.
Horses did neigh, and dying men did groan,
And ghosts did shriek and squeal about the streets.
O Caesar! These things are beyond all use,
And I do fear them.
Thesis:
Thematic Subject:
Ethos
Logos
"If this were true, then should I know this secret"
(Before she says this, Brutus says "You are my true and honorable wife")
Ethos
Logos
Context: Calpurnia has a bad dream about Casear dying and worries for his safety.
Audience: Calpurnia is talking to Caesar.
Context: Brutus is at his home after Cassius has tried to persuade him to join the conspiracy. He tries to justify joining it by worrying what Caesar will do if he becomes emperor.
Audience: Brutus is talking to himself.

Fear:
a distressing emotion aroused by impending danger; concern or anxiety
In
The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
, Shakespeare reveals the theme that fear can control one's thoughts and actions through the words of Brutus, Calpurnia, and Portia.
Connection to Thesis
It must be by his death, and for my part
I know no personal cause to spurn at him
But for the general. He would be crowned.
How that might change his nature, there’s the question.
It is the bright day that brings forth the adder
And that craves wary walking. Crown him that,
And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.
Th' abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power. And, to speak truth of Caesar,
I have not known when his affections swayed
More than his reason. But ’tis a common proof
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
Whereto the climber upward turns his face.
But when he once attains the upmost round,
He then unto the ladder turns his back,
Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend. So Caesar may.
Then, lest he may, prevent. And since the quarrel
Will bear no color for the thing he is,
Fashion it thus: that what he is, augmented,
Would run to these and these extremities.
And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg—
Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—
And kill him in the shell.
Pathos
Ethos
Pathos
Connection to Thesis
Pathos
"I never stole on ceremonies"

"Besides the things that we have heard and seen"

Calpurnia says that she's never believed in dreams and that they didn't personally witness what she is describing.
Logos
By: Allison Cantrall, Cory Carmichael, Leah Franklin, and Natalie Wise
Portia
Act II, Scene 1, Lines 291-302
"If this were true, then should I know this secret.
I grant I am a woman; but withal
A woman that Lord Brutus took to wife:
I grant I am a woman; but withal
A woman well-reputed, Cato's daughter.
Think you I am no stronger than my sex,
Being so father'd and so husbanded?
Tell me your counsels, I will not disclose 'em:
I have made strong proof of my constancy,
Giving myself a voluntary wound
Here, in the thigh: can I bear that with patience.
And not my husband's secrets?"
Loaded words:
"drizzled blood upon the Capitol."
"dying men did groan."
"ghosts did shriek and squeal about the streets."
"Fierce fiery warriors fought"
"And I do fear them."

Context: Portia is worried because Brutus refuses to tell her his secret.
Audience: Portia is speaking to Brutus.
"He would be crowned.
How that might change his nature, there’s the question."

"And then I grant we put a sting in him
That at his will he may do danger with.
Th' abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power."

"But ’tis a common proof
That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,"

"And therefore think him as a serpent’s egg—
Which, hatched, would as his kind grow mischievous—
And kill him in the shell."
"I grant I am a woman; but withal
A woman well-reputed, Cato's daughter.
Think you I am no stronger than my sex,
Being so father'd and so husbanded?"
"Giving myself a voluntary wound
Here, in the thigh: can I bear that with patience.
And not my husband's secrets?"
"Tell me your counsels, I will not disclose 'em:"
"It must be by his death, and for my part
I know no personal cause to spurn at him
But for the general."
"scorning the base degrees
By which he did ascend"
Brutus is afraid of what will happen if Caesar becomes emperor
He uses mainly logic to show how Caesar might become corrupt
EX: Compares Caesar to a "serpent"--he should "kill him in the shell" before he hatches and grows "mischievious"
His fear for the future with Caesar as emperor causes him to decide that Rome would be better off without him and join the conspiracy.
In Conclusion...
In all three of these situations, the speaker is influenced by fear and was unsuccessful in their actions caused by their fears for one reason or another.
Brutus is afraid of Caesar gaining too much power, so he decides to join the conspiracy. He helps with the assassination and because of this is later killed.
Calpurnia is afraid that her dream will come true and Caesar will be hurt, so she tries to get Caesar to stay home from the Capital. However, he doesn't heed her advice and is assassinated.
Portia is afraid that Brutus doesn't trust her anymore because he won't reveal his secret to her, so she stabs her leg to prove herself and eventually commits suicide.
This shows that one should be cautious of how fear affects them to prevent these types of occurrences.
"I have made strong proof of my constancy"
"Th' abuse of greatness is when it disjoins
Remorse from power."
"O Caesar! These things are beyond all use"
Calpurnia is afraid for Caesar's safety because of her horrible dream.
She uses pathos to show Caesar how this dream has affected her in an attempt to get him to be cautious.
Her fear causes her to try and cause Caesar to stay at home to prevent anything bad from happening.
*There is barely any usage of logos because she is describing her dream.*
**There is not a lot of pathos, because Brutus is very logical thinker**
Connection to Thesis
Portia is worried that Brutus is concealing something from her.
She's afraid the secret could be bad, dishonorable, etc.
She uses ethos, logos, and pathos to try and convince Brutus that she is worthy of his secret.
EX: Stabbing herself in the leg
Her fear due to her uncertainty causes her to hurt and eventually kill herself.
Brutus is saying that the only cause he himself has for joining the conspiracy is for the public good.
Brutus uses loaded words such as:
Portia claims that even though she is a woman, she has a good reputation and is Cato's daughter and Brutus's wife.
Portia tries to cause Brutus to feel pity and reveal his secret to her by stabbing herself in the leg.
Full transcript