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Rhetoric Speech

Julius Caesar
by

Sarah Coombs

on 3 March 2015

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Transcript of Rhetoric Speech

by Antony in Julius Caesar Rhetoric Speech Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.
The evil that men do lives after them,
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you Caesar was ambitious.
If it were so, it was a grievous fault,
And grievously hath Caesar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus and the rest
When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept.
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.
You all did see that on the Lupercal
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And, sure, he is an honorable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause.
What cause withholds you then to mourn for him?
O judgment! Thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason. Bear with me.
My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar,
And I must pause till it come back to me. (weeps) Friends, Romans, countrymen, give me your attention. I have come here to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do is remembered after their deaths, but the good is often buried with them. It might as well be the same with Caesar. The noble Brutus told you that Caesar was ambitious. If that’s true, it’s a serious fault, and Caesar has paid seriously for it. With the permission of Brutus and the others—for Brutus is an honorable man; they are all honorable men—I have come here to speak at Caesar’s funeral. He was my friend, he was faithful and just to me. But Brutus says he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. He brought many captives home to Rome whose ransoms brought wealth to the city.Is this the work of an ambitious man? When the poor cried, Caesar cried too. Ambition shouldn’t be so soft. Yet Brutus says he was ambitious, and Brutus is an honorable man. You all saw that on the Lupercal feast day I offered him a king’s crown three times, and he refused it three times. Was this ambition? Yet Brutus says he was ambitious. And, no question, Brutus is an honorable man. I am not here to disprove what Brutus has said, but to say what I know. You all loved him once, and not without reason. Then what reason holds you back from mourning him now? Men have become brutish beasts and lost their reason! Bear with me. My heart is in the coffin there with Caesar, and I must pause until it returns to me. (he weeps) Appeals ETHOS LOGOS PATHOS Different
Perspectives "For Brutus is an honorable man; so are they all, all honorable men." Rhetorical Question AD HOMINEN Tone Argumentation Rhetoric Mode Rhetorical strategies:
- ethos, pathos, and logos
-antithesis
-epistrophe
-synecdoche
-irony
-anecdote
-asyndeton
-ad hominen Synecdoche Antithesis Epistrophe Irony "When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept."
This ancedote questions the citizens' reasoning, etc. THE END. G.S.
Come I to speak in Caesar's funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me;
But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill;
Did this in Caesar seem ambitious? (For Brutus is an honorable man,
So are they all, all honorable men), HOW: Antony is attacking Brutus's moral integrity rather than the situation at hand.

WHY: Each time Antony declares how “honorable” a man Brutus is, the phrase gathers an increasingly sarcastic tone until, by the end of the speech, its meaning has been completely changed and Brutus has lost his credibility. He allows the people to come to the conclusion that Brutus's intentions are not as honorable as he claims. anecdote pathos pathos logos antithesis epistrophe "Then what reason holds you back from mourning him now? Men have become brutish beasts and lost their reason!" "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.
I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him." Asyndeton: "Friends, Romans, countrymen,"
Establishes relationship with audience
Makes speaker more trustworthy/reliable
Assures audience of his purpose right away Creates an emotional connection with the audience. "But Brutus says he was ambitious,
And Brutus is an honorable man." How: Antony develops an image of two contrasting ideas. The ideas are balanced by the opposite phrases “speak not to” and “am to speak”.

Why: The repetitive use of phrases consisting of similar words and structure, but having opposite meanings, clearly emphasize Antony’s speech. This simple, contrasting phrase is especially important to his speech because he is speaking to commoners who were traditionally uneducated. "I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.” "You all did see that on the Lupercal I thrice presented him a kingly crown which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?" "Was this ambition?" Repeated to further challenge citizen's logic How: Antony is calling for their attention by asking for their ears, which are just a part of their body. He is using ears to represent their attention and their entire body.

Why: This synecdoche acts as an opener to Antony’s speech. This is an important part of his speech because it grabs the attention of his listeners before Antony continues to address the major issue on his mind. “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;” When Antony mocks Brutus, he repeats the end phrase "is an honorable man" 5x throughout the speech, thus surmounting to the impact on the audience.
Consistent placement of phrase is repeated and creates a progressive strategy to reach the climax of his speech.
The phrase "honorable man" specifically chosen at the end of the phrase to create a lasting dramatic result.
"ambition" and "honorable" not only mocks Brutus, but mocks but questions and challenges the Romans' intelligence. Argumentation: Antony validated and justified his opinion by presenting reasoning and persuasive means to convince the audience. Purpose: to convince the Romans that Caesar was wrongfully assasinated and refute his image as an honorable, noble, and true leader of Rome sarcastic Antony provides evidences of Caesar's humility and attachment to his people, but at the same time states "honorable" Brutus's claim that he is ambitious.
The two contradictory ideas are the basis for the sarcasm in the speech.
While he says that Brutus is honorable the crowd can tell from that he means the opposite from the immediate contrast of Caesar's actions and Brutus's belief. "I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition?
Yet Brutus says he was ambitious,
And sure he is an honourable man." "Was this ambition?" Caesar's use of a rhetorical question allowed the common people to think for themselves and come to their own decision
He did not force the idea onto them, he allowed them to construct it themselves.
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