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Simile

Freshman 2011-12 Simile introduction
by

Dustin O'Donnell

on 19 September 2011

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Transcript of Simile

Types of Imagery Results Research Imagery Notes Place your own picture
behind this frame! Double click to crop it if necessary San Francisco Budapest An image that is concrete and appeals to any of the five senses - sight, sound, touch, taste, smell; Vivid descriptive language that appeals to one or more of the senses. (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr (cc) photo by Franco Folini on Flickr (cc) photo by jimmyharris on Flickr Stockholm (cc) photo by Metro Centric on Flickr Imagery can be shown through other literary devices such as metaphor, simile and personification. Visual Imagery A full moon in a black sky "In our kitchen, he would bolt his orange juice (squeezed on one of those ribbed glass sombreros and then poured off through a strainer) and grab a bite of toast (the toaster a simple tin box, a kind of little hut with slit and slanted sides, that rested over a gas burner and browned one side of the bread, in stripes, at a time), and then he would dash, so hurriedly that his necktie flew back over his shoulder, down through our yard, past the grapevines hung with buzzing Japanese-beetle traps, to the yellow brick building, with its tall smokestack and wide playing fields, where he taught."


(John Updike, "My Father on the Verge of Disgrace" in Licks of Love: Short Stories and a Sequel, 2000) •Sound (Auditory) Imagery
 "At the next table a woman stuck her nose in a novel; a college kid pecked at a laptop. Overlaying all this, a soundtrack: choo-k-choo-k-choo-k-choo-k-choo-k--the metronomic rhythm of an Amtrak train rolling down the line to California, a sound that called to mind an old camera reel moving frames of images along a linear track, telling a story."


(Andy Isaacson, "Riding the Rails." The New York Times, March 8, 2009)

 The chirp of crickets
 •Touch (Tactile) Imagery
 A warm breeze
 "When the others went swimming my son said he was going in, too. He pulled his dripping trunks from the line where they had hung all through the shower and wrung them out. Languidly, and with no thought of going in, I watched him, his hard little body, skinny and bare, saw him wince slightly as he pulled up around his vitals the small, soggy, icy garment. As he buckled the swollen belt, suddenly my groin felt the chill of death.


(E.B. White, "Once More to the Lake," 1941) Smell Imagery Freshly mowed grass "I lay still and took another minute to smell: I smelled the warm, sweet, all-pervasive smell of silage, as well as the sour dirty laundry spilling over the basket in the hall. I could pick out the acrid smell of Claire’s drenched diaper, her sweaty feet, and her hair crusted with sand. The heat compounded the smells, doubled the fragrance. Howard always smelled and through the house his scent seemed always to be warm. His was a musky smell, as if the source of a muddy river, the Nile or the Mississippi, began right in his armpits. I had grown used to thinking of his smell as the fresh man smell of hard work. Too long without washing and I tenderly beat his knotty arms with my fists. That morning there was alfalfa on his pillow and cow manure embedded in his tennis shoes and the cuffs of his coveralls that lay by the bed. Those were sweet reminders of him. He had gone out as one shaft of searing light came through the window. He had put on clean clothes to milk the cows."


(Jane Hamilton, A Map of the World. Random House, 1994) Taste Imagery The tang of a cold glass of lemonade I have eaten

the plums

that were in

the icebox



and which

you were probably

saving

for breakfast



Forgive me

they were delicious

so sweet

and so cold


(William Carlos Williams, "This Is Just to Say")
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