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modernism vs fundamentalism

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Kimia Sadeghi

on 23 January 2015

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Transcript of modernism vs fundamentalism

What is Modernism?
“A form of a religion, especially in Islam, that upholds belief in the strict, literal interpretation of scripture.”
What is Fundamentalism?
"A movement towards modifying traditional beliefs in accordance with modern ideas, a movement towards individual freedoms of speech, religion, and sexuality."

The Islamic Revolution
The Shah
Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi
Wanted to introduce a modern-western aspect of culture to Iran
Could not maintain the economy
Many protests against him
The last shah of Iran
Persepolis IOP
By: Kimia Sadeghi
Modernism vs Fundamentalism
in Persepolis

Pre-revolution
Post-revolution
Diction
Tone
Belief/Religion
Clothing
Laws
How This is Portrayed in Persepolis
Literarily
Figuratively
Effect
Colour
Attitude
THE END
Any Questions?
Black and white express extreme opposites
White represents freedom
Black represents restrain and oppression
Marjane uses contrast between the two to show the reader that white is a form of modernism and black is a form of fundamentalism
[mod-er-niz-uh m]
[fuhn-duh-men-tl-iz-uh m]
Iran was ruled by a monarchy
The economy began to decline
People questioned the motives of the shah
Iran was westernized
Veils were optional
Many educational opportunities
Figurative Language
“The revolution is like a bicycle. If the wheels don’t turn, it falls.”

Simile
Imagery
Emanata
Symbolism
Figuratively and literarily
"I was a westerner in Iran, an Iranian in the west. I had no identity."


Graphic weight
Colour
Figurative Language
"With practice"
"you got to the point where you could guess their shape and the way they wore their hair and even their political opinions"
Adapted
Conflict
External conflict
Internal conflict
"I really don't know what to think about the veil. Deep down I was very religious but as a family we were very modern."
Following the revolution Khomeini became the country's Supreme Leader
Islamic Republic
Many of the laws in Iran had now changed
Iran officially became a fundamentalist country
background
The conflicting thoughts that Marji and many other Iranians felt, after a sudden shift to a religious fundamentalist belief.
Conflict
Diction
Tone
"You showed your opposition to the regime by letting a few strands of hair show"
Demonstration (protests)
Rebellion
Emanata
Conflict between modernism and fundamentalism
Initiated by islamic fundamentalists
The people of Iran had had enough
"In short...Everything was pretext to arrest us."
"We found ourselves veiled and separated from our friends."
"I had conformed to society"
"My faith was NOT UN-shakeable"
Double negative
Gender segregation
Choice of being a modernist or fundamentalist
After the revolution everyone had to show signs of the regime (ex. wearing a veil)
Emotional/serious
Liberating
Humorous
Ex. Satrapi uses a serious tone to depict the guardians of the revolution (fundamentalists) but then changes tone to humorous once she starts making excuses as to why shes wearing westernized clothing
Obscured laws
Guardians of the revolution
Literary and figurative devices have a significant effect on Persepolis
(a modernist)
Full transcript