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Hurricanes - Tonadoes Project

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john love

on 11 May 2015

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Transcript of Hurricanes - Tonadoes Project

Tropical depression
when the winds increase to more than 20 knots (23 miles per hour)


Hurricane
damage hurricanes cause
Hurricane
Hurricanes usually form in water of about 80 degrees Fahrenheit and near the equator when warm air rises causing an area of lower air pressure system air from surrounding areas with higher air pressure pushes. Into the low pressure area then that new air becomes warm and moist and rises too. as the wind spins and grows fed by the oceans heat and water evaporating from the surface of the ocean
hurricane environmental impact when it makes land fall
When a hurricane reaches land it makes a storm surge that floods the surrounding area. That can cause the trees to uproot and fall which can land on people or their property. The surge can kill animals and other stuff like what they eat and plant life. Resulting in a change in the food chain because the trees and surge killed of their food
Hurricanes - Tornadoes Project
John Love
Where do hurricanes occur the most and why
While the hurricane is above water it can cause it rise several meters above water and when it gets near the shore all of that rising waters floods the area the hurricanes is moving over. Causing damage to house , life and property. Even when the hurricane is over they still. Have a long time of rebuilding period that the area has to go through
Hurricanes mostly occur in warm oceans of about 80 degrees Fahrenheit. They form there because the warm moist air fuels the hurricane and causes it to form
Tropical storm
Tropical disturbance
Years with the most hurricanes
Until recently 1933 had the most hurricanes with 21. In 2005 that record was broken when the hurricane center said that there were 28 storms in that year
Saffir - Simpson scale
Hurricane wind scale is a 1 to 15 rating based on a hurricanes sustained wind speed. this scale estimates potential property damage
What causes a tornado to form
Tornadoes are formed when two different air masses meet. When cooler polar air masses meet warm and moist tropical air masses, the potential for severe weather is created in air masses to the west are typically masses. they also form most during super cell thunderstorms from an intensely rotating updraft
www.weatherquestions.com/What_causes_tornadoes.htm
Resources
www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-hurricane.htm
teachertech.rice.edu/Participants/.../hurricanes/stages.html
http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/hurricane-profile/
http://www.infoplease.com/encyclopedia/weather/hurricane-damage-caused-hurricanes.html
http://www.baynews9.com/content/news/baynews9/weather/hurricane-center/faq.html
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saffir–Simpson_hurricane_wind_scale

Resources
http://www.weatherwizkids.com/weather-tornado.htm
http://devanmoura.weebly.com/environmental-impact.html
tornadoes most likely occur
in the states that make up tornado alley because the flat grasslands are a perfect place for pressure systems to collide creating powerful storms that turn into powerful tornadoes
Tornadoes effect the environment by destroying buildings and trees. Tornadoes also kill animals, which effects the food chain and disrupts the whole environment. Tornadoes destroy our farms, which means there will be food shortages around the surrounding area. After everything is destroyed, humans have to rebuild. Tornadoes can cause water contamination, which poses a serious problem, as plants, animals and humans are effected by this. Debris can be very dangerous, as it could kill plants and animals very easily
type of damage caused by tornadoes
current tornadoes and damage caused
The tornado that tore through northern Illinois Thursday night has received a preliminary rating of EF4 based on an initial ground survey of the most heavily damaged area. Earlier in the day Friday, local officials said they were confident everyone was out of the area. Kirkland Fire Department Chief Chad Connell said they brought in three K-9 teams as a “precautionary measure,” to “double check our work.” Connell said he expected the search-and-rescue portion of the operation to finish before 5 p.m. Central time.

“We think we have everyone accounted for,” added DeKalb County Sheriff Roger Scott. “We have no specific person that’s unaccounted for.”

The area struck yesterday still has no power. Local officials said residents could come to assess the damage to their property on an “escorted basis,” but encouraged people not to stay around until conditions were proven safe

http://www.weather.com/news/news/tornado-damage-seen-in-northern-illinois
The effect of a tornado on humans depends not only on its strength but on where it touches down. Tornadoes that sweep through remote rural areas, for example, will have far less impact than those that hit crowded urban areas. Tornadoes occur around the world but are most common in the so-called Tornado Alley of the Midwestern United States
Tornadoes effect on humans
http://science.opposingviews.com/tornadoes-effects-people-23124.html
2011 was an unusually active and deadly year for tornadoes across the U.S., with a total of 1,691 tornadoes reported across the country, more than any other year on record except for 2004, which saw 1,817 tornadoes. Several tornado records were broken in 2011, including for greatest number of tornadoes in a single month
year with the most tornadoes
a scale of tornado severity with numbers from 0 to 6, based on the degree of observed damage
Fujita scale
http://www.spc.noaa.gov/faq/tornado/f-scale.html
A mass of thunderstorms that have only a slight wind circulation


it forms when the maximum sustained winds have increased to 39-73mph it begins to look more like a hurricane.At this point the storm has been given a name.




finally forms when the surface pressures continue to drop and when sustained wind speeds reach 74 mph there is also a definite rotation about the eye
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