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What is Influenza?

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by

Shelby Parsons

on 28 October 2014

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Transcript of What is Influenza?

What is Influenza?
What is Influenza?
Influenza, commonly known as the flu, is a severe respiratory infection that can be caused by a variety of subtypes of the virus (i.e. H1, H3, N9), mostly affecting the very young and the elderly. Pregnant women and overweight individuals are also particularly at risk. Underlying conditions that compromise the immune system, including asthma, COPD, cancer, HIV/AIDS, etc., can lead to increased difficulties, and further complications such as pneumonia and even death.
Ways of Transmission
The virus spreads from person to person by droplets of respiratory fluids when someone coughs or sneezes. It can also be spread through touching a surface that has been infected, such as a doorknob, elevator buttons, handrails, etc., and then touching your face without cleaning your hands.
Families of influenza:
Type A- poses the most threat towards humans
- has many different strains
Type B- Affects humans but is milder and doesn't change very often.
Type C - more commonly found in birds
- doesn't directly affect humans
North
America

In North America, the flu season lasts usually between November and April.
We're here!
Influenza can be easily spread from person to person especially in such a small place like Newfoundland.
Many people do not get the the flu vaccine. This results in individuals being more susceptible to the flu.
The flu affects everyone therefore the healthcare system plays a major role through influencing and caring for the population.


- Flu Vaccinations
- Importance of exercising and eating right to fight off diseases
- Hand washing
- Pandemic Planning
- Educating the population
The health care system needs to focus on promotion and prevention to maintain the health of the population by:
Influenza has a new strain every year, we depend on the southern hemisphere to determine what strain will be most common in the north.
As a major part of the health care system, nurses need to also promote the importance of prevention.
- Promote vaccinations
- Promote hand washing
- Plan for outbreaks
- Utilize Isolated Rooms
- Educate patients about influenza and the importance of vaccinations
- Promote sterilization in hospitals and homes
- Wear the proper personal protective equipment to avoid spread
Many people think the flu is harmless. However, anywhere between 4000 and 8000 people die in Canada each year and about 20,000 are hospitalized.


The most affected are children under 5 and adults above the age of 65 and because of North America's aging population more people are at risk.
I wonder how grandma is feeling..
The cost of influenza epidemics in North America is estimated at $71-167 billion per year.
By: Heather, Janine, Julia, Melania, Melvina, Renee, and Shelby
Newfoundland's population is aging. This creates more risks for progression of the flu to become more prevalent.
North America, with its major transit points, such as international airports and seaports, connects people from around the world. Given that influenza is transmissible in various ways, this provides opportunity for quick and easy transmission of the virus.
References
Health of Alberta
http://www.health.alberta.ca/health-info/influenza.html
Healthy Canadians
http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/diseases-conditions-maladies-affections/disease-maladie/flu-grippe/professionals-professionnels-eng.php
Body and Health Canada
http://bodyandhealth.canada.com/channel_condition_info_details.asp?disease_id=76&channel_id=1020&relation_id=10884
WHO-Influenza
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs211/en/
CDC-Influenza
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/
Health Line – Influenza
http://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/cold-or-flu#2
Oxford Journals- Origin and Evolution of Influenza virus
http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/content/19/4/501.full
Nature- Study revives bird origin for 1918 flu pandemic
http://www.nature.com/news/study-revives-bird-origin-for-1918-flu-pandemic-1.14723
Medical Ecology- Influenza
http://www.medicalecology.org/diseases/influenza/influenza.htm


References
Journal of General Virology- The origin of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus
http://vir.sgmjournals.org/content/84/9/2285.full
National Geographic- 1918 Flu Pandemic
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140123-spanish-flu-1918-china-origins-pandemic-science-health/
Health Canada- Influenza
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hc-ps/dc-ma/influenza-eng.php
Public Health Agency of Canada- Reported Influenza Hospitalizations and Deaths in Canada
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/influenza/flu-stat-eng.php
Immunize Canada- Influenza Immunization Awareness Campaign 2014-2015
http://immunize.ca/en/events/influenza-imm-campaign.aspx
Webb MD- Flu or Cold Symptoms
http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/cold-guide/flu-cold-symptoms
CDC-Everyday Preventive Actions
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/updated/everyday_preventive.pdf
CDC- Preventing the flu
http://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/habits.htm
Interesting Facts about the Flu
http://facts.randomhistory.com/2009/07/19_flu.html
Interesting Facts about Influenza
Scientists believe that flu pandemics occur two or three times in each country
Native Americans died at a rate four times the national average from the spanish flu
Flu viruses can live up to 48 hours on hard surfaces
Viruses are 20 to 100 times smaller than bacteria and can only be seen with a microscope
The government suggests people have a good food and water supply in case any flu quarantines or emergencies arise
Flu vaccines come from chickens, which is why people who are allergic to eggs can become allergic to the vaccine
People who were born before 1957 have some immunity to the novel H1N1
It costs billions of dollars to cover the cost of flu epidemics each year just in the U.S alone.
Questions?
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