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VERB TENSES

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Carlos David Martin Alonso

on 16 October 2012

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Transcript of VERB TENSES


will be + (verb + ing) VERBS Verb tense expresses the time of an event or action.
Time and how it is expressed in writing is very important to English readers. The English language has twelve different tenses. In this lesson, we will review the meaning of each verb tense. The Importance of Time Verb Tense Review Snow falls in the December in Minnesota.
Water boils at 100 degrees Celsius. This tense also expresses general truths or facts that are timeless. The Simple Present Tense She goes to work everyday.
They always eat lunch together. Expresses a habit or often repeated action.
Adverbs of frequency such as, often, seldom, sometimes, never, etc. are used with this tense. The Simple Present Tense I have seen that movie before.
He has already visited Vietnam.
(Specific dates and times are not mentioned.) The present perfect is also used to talk about an event
that was completed in the past, but the specific time of the event is not important. The Present Perfect I attended MJC in 1998. (I no longer attend MJC.)
I saw a movie every weekend when I was a teenager.
(I don’t see movies very much anymore.) The simple past is used to describe actions and/or events
that are now completed and no longer true in the present. The Simple Past I visited my sister yesterday.
We went out to dinner last night. We use the simple past to indicate exactly when
an action or event took place in the past. The Simple Past She is meeting a new client at eleven o’clock.
The train leaves at 6:00 a.m. tomorrow. The simple present and present progressive are also used to express future time. These are often used used in connection with schedules. The Future Thomas will graduate in June.
Maria is going to go to Mexico next week. Will and be + going + to are often used to describe future actions. The Future She has been living in Taiwan for the last
two months, but she plans to move soon. This tense is also used to describe events that have
been in progress recently and are rather temporary. Present Perfect Progressive He has been studying grammar for an hour.
She has been cooking all day.
(He is still studying and she is still cooking.) This tense is used to describe the duration of an action
that began in the past and continues into the present. Present Perfect Progressive He has lived in Modesto for two years.
(He began living in Modesto two years ago
and he still lives there.) The present perfect is used to talk about an event
that began in the past and continues up to the present. The Present Perfect I was studying for an exam while my mother
was cooking dinner.
We were walking in the park around 7 p.m. last night. The past progressive is used to talk about an activity
that was in progress at a specific point of time in the past. The emphasis is on the duration of the activity in the past. The Past Progressive John is living in Modesto, but he might move soon. The present progressive can also be used to describe
an action that is occurring in the present, but is temporary. The Present Progressive Reviewing Verb Tenses she found the right office had been driving She had been driving around the city for three
hours before she finally found the right office. This tense is used to emphasize the duration of
an action that was completed before another
action or event in the past. Past Perfect Progressive it hit
my friend stopped by had received
had eaten The Titanic had received many warnings before
it hit the iceberg.
I had already eaten when my friend stopped by to visit. This tense describes completed events that took
place in the past before another past event. The Past Perfect will have been living in the U.S. for eight years finishes law school By the time he finishes law school, we
will have been living in the U.S. for eight years. This tense describes an action that has been in progress
for a duration of time before another event or time in the future. Future Perfect Progressive class ends will have finished the exam We will have finished the exam by the
time class ends tomorrow. This tense is used to describe an event or action that will be completed before another event or time in the future. The Future Perfect at 10 a.m. tomorrow
by the time you arrive I will be teaching ESL 40 at 10 a.m. tomorrow.
They will be moving their furniture out of the
house by the time you arrive tomorrow. This tense is used to describe an event or action that will occur over a period of time at a specific point in the future. The Future Progressive I was taking a bath when the doorbell rang.
They were eating dinner when the neighbors
stopped by for a visit. The past progressive is often used with the simple
past to show that one action was in progress when another action occurred. The Past Progressive She is typing a paper for her class.
He can’t talk. He is fixing the sink right now. This tense is used to describe an action that is
occurring right now (at this moment, today, this year, etc.). The action has begun and is still in progress. The Present Progressive repeated action in the past
Ex: She would take a walk every morning when she was young. WOULD Advisability
Ex: You should do your homework instead of going to the movies. SHOULD MODALS FUTURE PERFECT TENSE FUTURE PROGRESSIVE TENSE SIMPLE FUTURE TENSE PAST PERFECT TENSE One thing happened before and was
in process at a particular time in the past, and it continued.
Ex: I was doing my homework. MEANING PAST PROGRESSIVE TENSE SIMPLE PAST TENSE wanted, turned, dropped
hurt, come, build
felt, gone, hidden
blown, grown, known
begun, rung, swum PARTICIPLE PRESENT PERFECT TENSE One thing happened in the past, and is in progress at the present time, and probably will continue.
Ex: I am washing the dishes. MEANING PRESENT PROGRESSIVE
TENSE SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE A. Simple tenses
B. Progressive tenses
C. Perfect tenses
D.*Perfect progressive tenses
(not covered here) OVERVIEW The sources are from Betty Schrampfer Azar’s chartbook. CITATION unfulfilled wish
Ex: I would have learned more about how to use proper verb tenses before coming to the U.S. WOULD polite for “want” (with like)
Ex: I would like to have some tea, please. WOULD polite request
Ex: Would you please pass me the salt? WOULD impossibility (negative only)
Ex: That couldn’t be his dog because his dog was dead yesterday. COULD less than 50% certainty
Ex: She could be in her office. COULD suggestion (affirmative only)
Ex: You could do some research about this topic to see whether you have the right answer. COULD polite request
Ex: Could you teach me with this math problem? COULD past ability
Ex: I could get up early when I was young. COULD 90% certainty (expectation)
Ex: He should attend the meeting tomorrow. SHOULD should
could
would What are they? wanted, turned, dropped
hurt, come, build
felt, gone, hidden
blown, grown, known
begun, rung, swum PARTICIPLE The action will be completely done before another time in the future.

Ex: Albert will already have taken shower before he goes to bed. MEANING One thing will happen in the future, and it will be in process at a particular time in the future, and it will probably continue.

Ex: Katie will be sleeping when her father comes home. MEANING At one particular time in the future, it will happen.
Ex: Jason will go to bed at 12 o’clock. MEANING The assignment that talks about what do
we want to do in the future. ASSIGNMENTS THAT MAY USE FUTURE TENESES wanted, turned, dropped
hurt, come, build
felt, gone, hidden
blown, grown, known
begun, rung, swum PARTICIPLE The action was completely done before another time in the past.
Ex: He had already finished his exam before I met him. MEANING was typing
+ leaving
were working
(verb + ing) Examples for verbs in the past progressive sentences At one particular time in the past, it happened. It began and ended in past.

Ex: I walked to school this morning. MEANING The action happened before now.
The exact time is not important.
Ex: She has already dropped the class. MEANING am walking
is + doing
are staying
(verb + ing) Examples for verbs in the present progressive sentences Activities or events that occurring in the
present.Summarizing pieces of writing,
films, plays. Stating ongoing opinions, beliefs,
habits, and facts.
Ex: I ride a bike to school everyday. MEANING The assignment that talks about “who I am.”
The assignment that introduces ourselves. ASSIGNMENTS THAT MAY USE PRESENT TENSES 1. Present
2. Past
3. future OVERVIEW Do all the verbs belong to the time cluster (present, past, or future) in one paragraph?
If yes, ask yourself that does each verb convey precisely the time you had in mind, the relationship to other times or actions, and the idea of an action completed or in progress?
If no, look carefully at the verbs that do not fit. Is there a reason for the switch in time? Then, rewrite the verb that provides the appropriate indication of time. EDITING ADVICE Underline the possible verbs that show or imply some action.
Change the time of the sentence and find the word that changes.
*Some verbs may contain two words “ex: I am going to school.” HOW TO FIND THE VERB? Clear and easy to understand
Consistency
To express the event with proper
verb tenses IMPORTANCE FOR CORRECT VERB TENSES During the tutoring session, I believe that many tutees often write their essays with wrong verb tenses.
I want to learn it myself. WHY THE TOPIC? EVERYONE!! SPECIAL THANKS preference
Ex: I would rather die than get married with him. WOULD to write about the wishes.
The assignment that talks about one thing that changes one person’s life. EXAMPLES FOR MODALS
will + have +
(participle) Verbs in the future perfect tense Verbs in the future progressive sentences
will
be going to Verbs in the simple future tense
had + (participles) Verbs in the past perfect tense Irregular :
became, began
blew, grew
thought, taught
cut, hurt, let Regular:
played, walked, noticed
The assignment that talks about childhood.
The assignment about what you did during the summer. ASSIGNMENTS THAT MAY USE
PAST TENSES Plural:
Write
Study
Walk Singular:
Writes
Studies
walks Verbs in the simple present tense PAST FUTURE NOW How to distinguish different verb
tenses Verb Tenses Irregular verbs can form their past tense and past participle forms in various way.
These forms cause even native speakers innumerable problems.
The most irregular verb of all is the verb to be.
Another irregular verb that is important for its use with other verbs is the verb to have. Irregular Verbs Future tense expresses action which will take place in the future.
It uses the helping verbs will or shall* and the present tense form of the verb).
Examples: He will send the letter tomorrow. I shall wait here until you return.
* Traditionally, shall is used for 1st person and will for 2nd and 3rd persons. Future Tense Conjugation of the verb: to be Other Common Irregular Verbs and their Principal Parts Regular verbs and their Principal Parts Future perfect tense expresses action which will be completed before a certain time in the future. (This is the before-future tense)
It uses the helping verbs will have or shall have and the past participle of the verb.
Example: He will have finished the paper before next Friday. Future Perfect Tense Past perfect tense expresses action completed before certain time in the past. (This is the before-past tense.)
It uses the helping verb had and the past participle of the verb.
Example: She had written the letter before I saw her. Past Perfect Tense Present perfect tense expresses action completed at the present time (perfect means complete) or begun in the past and continuing into the present.
This tense uses the helping verbs has and have and the past participle of the verb.
Examples:
He has written a letter to his uncle. (completed action)
The Waltons have lived here for seven years. (continuing) Present Perfect Tense Past tense expresses action completed at a definite time in the past.
Examples: He wrote the letter yesterday. She lived to be 90 years old. Past Tense Present tense may express action which is going on at the present time or which occurs always, repeatedly, or habitually.
Examples: He sees the train. He eats cereal for breakfast every day. Present Tense A conjugation of a verb is the correct arrangement of its form through its tenses, persons, and numbers.
Person means the speaker, the person spoken to, and the person or thing spoken of.
Number means singular or plural. Conjugation Four Principal/Main Parts Regular verbs form their past tense and past participle by adding –ed or –d to their present tense form.
More than 95% of all English verbs are regular.
Regular verbs cause few problems in speaking and writing. Regular Verbs Tense denotes the time of the action indicated by a verb. The time is not always the same as that indicated by the name of the tense. Verb Tense Irregular Regular Verb Forms Verb Forms Future
Perfect Present Verb Tenses Past Future Present
Perfect Past
Perfect 6 Types Verbs in the simple past tense
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