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Himalayas

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Sinead McDonagh

on 28 October 2014

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Transcript of Himalayas

The Himalayas
Sinead McDonagh
Location
The Himalayan Mountains are located in Asia. More specifically, they cover Nepal, Bhutan, northern Pakistan, and the northern states of India.
Threats to the Himalayas
Although the Himalayas are completely remote and common belief is that they are inaccessible, people have managed to use and degrade the mountains. The forests of the Himalayas are prone to extensive clearing for cultivation and logging. The wood is used for timber. Fuel wood has also been discovered and extracted. The Himalayan grasslands are overgrazed by domestic cattle and yak. The flora of the fragile alpine meadows have been over exploited for traditional medicine. Humans have even been part of the degradation because people have learned to live on and build roads on the mountains.
Conservation Efforts
Outlook
Environmental Conditions
The Himalayas are categorized as alpine mountains. High mountains such as the Himalayas have varying climate. Some parts of the range can be very cold and have a lot of precipitation while others can be extremely dry and windy. Such dissimilar conditions cannot support much plant or animal life.

Endemism
The Rain Shadow Effect
The Himalayas are subject to the Rain Shadow Effect, which is a phenomena in which there is low precipitation on one side of a mountain while prevailing winds flow up and over the other side of the mountain or range of high mountains. This creates semiarid and arid conditions on the side that is blocked from the wind.
Snow Leopard
The Himalayas are a common home for endemic species. Not many species can survive on the mountains. This is because conditions of the Himalayas are very harsh and hard to adjust to. The elevation of mountains make them colder and the climate on the mountain varies based on weather and the location on the mountain.
Works Cited
Hotspot Site (Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund):

http://www.cepf.net/resources/hotspots/Asia-Pacific/Pages/Himalaya.aspx
Map:

http://mapssite.blogspot.com/2009/07/map-himalayas.html
Mount Everest:
http://s.hswstatic.com/gif/climbing-mount-everest-5.jpg
Himalayan Grassland:
http://assets.worldwildlife.org/photos/1250/images/original/Eastern-Himalaya-1600x600px.jpg?1345540783
Orchid:
http://www.planmyvacation.in/images/package/2009himalayanorchid.png
Golden Langur:
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_lNEeQtJMMOw/SXMmw8ZbNAI/AAAAAAAAA5I/klqolhwup94/s320/Golden+Langur+-+Arunchs.jpg
Himalayan Quail:
http://www.whatiscalled.com/content_images/california_quail_950360677.jpg
Himalayan Lizard:
http://www.team-bhp.com/forum/attachments/travelogues/446375d1288420551-great-himalayan-national-park-trek-photolog-1059649457_lnhpcxl.jpg
Caecilian:
http://www.filin.vn.ua/images/filin_images/amphibia/i_beddomei.jpg
Sisorid Catfish:
http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/custom/images/large/4c62990681915.jpg
Snow Leopard:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snow_leopard#mediaviewer/File:Snow_leopard_portrait.jpg
In 25 to 30 years, the Himalayas will make a complete comeback. With all of the conservation efforts, I believe the Himalayas will make a bounce back and all the destruction of the mountain range will be restored. The conservation of the Himalayas help to restore biodiversity, which in turn helps sustain the hotspot.
Endemic Species
Plants
Mammals
Birds
Reptiles
Amphibians
Fish
Species
10,000
300
977
176
105
269
Endemic
3,160
12
15
48
42
33
Panthera uncia
The snow leopard of the Himalayas is known for it's beautiful fur and elusive behavior. Native to the central Asian mountains, the snow leopard is now at risk of extinction. There are an estimated 4,500 to 6,000 snow leopards still in existence. Some reasons for the major decline of their population are hunters who sell their fur, destruction of their habitat, and lack of resources, including the limiting factor of harsh conditions.
World Heritage Sites (Corbett, Manas, Kazaranga, Chitwan, and Sagarmatha):
All together, these national park take up 113,000 km squared, which is about 15% of the Himalayan hotspot. These sites contribute to the biodiversity of the mountains as well as protect important ice.
The Livelihood and Forestry Project:
Targets communities living in and around forested areas, with the idea that decreasing poverty and increasing awareness and ownership over resources will result in greater biodiversity conservation.
Mount
Everest
Grasslands of
the Himalayas
Endemic Species
Plant: Orchid
Mammal:
Golden Langur
Bird:
Himalayan Quail
Reptile:
Himalayan
Lizard
Amphibian:
Caecilian
Fish:
Sisorid Catfish
Full transcript