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The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

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Emma Cayen

on 12 March 2015

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Transcript of The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
By Christopher Marlowe
Christopher Marlowe
Possibly a secret agent
arrested for being atheist
killed by Ingram Frizer over an argument over a bill.
Come live with me and be my love,

And we will all the pleasures prove.

That valleys, groves, hills, and fields,

Woods, or steepy mountain yields.
And we will sit upon the rocks,

Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks

By shallow rivers, to whose falls

melodious birds sing madrigals
And I will make thee beds of roses

And a thousand fragrant posies,

A cap of flowers and a kirtle

Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle;
A gown made of the finest wool

Which from our pretty lambs we pull;

Fair-lined slippers for the cold,

With buckles of the purest gold;
A belt of straw and ivy buds,

With coral clasps and amber studs.

And if these pleasures may thee move,

Come live with me and be my love.
The shepherds' swains shall dance and sing

For thy delight each May morning.

If these delights thy mind may move,

Then live with me and be my love.
Marlowe and Shakespeare
considered to be Shakespeare's most important predecessor
second to Shakespeare in the writing of Elizabethan Tragic Drama plays
Pastoral
This poem is a Pastoral Poem, meaning that it depicts shepherds and rustic life
Pastoral Paintings exhibit this theme as well
A vast number of pastoral paintings are done by Francois Boucher
alliteration
consonance
visual rhyme
rhyme
A
A
B
B
alliteration
personification
rhyme
rhyme
visual rhyme
rhyme
alliteration
rhyme
rhyme
alliteration
rhyme
visual rhyme
alliteration
rhyme
visual rhyme
written in 1589

Iambic Tetrameter
Come / live / with / me / and / be / my / love,
)
/
)
/
)
/
)
/
The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd
written in 1596 by Sir Walter Raleigh, three years after Marlowe's death
a reply to "The Passionate Shepherd to His Love"
If all the world and love were young,
And truth in every shepherd's tongue,
These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee and be thy love.

Time drives the flocks from field to fold
When rivers rage and rocks grow cold,
And Philomel becometh dumb;
The rest complains of cares to come.

The flowers do fade, and wanton fields
To wayward winter reckoning yields;
A honey tongue, a heart of gall,
Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall,

Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses,
Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies
Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten--
In folly ripe, in reason rotten.

Thy belt of straw and ivy buds,
Thy coral clasps and amber studs,
All these in me no means can move
To come to thee and be thy love.

But could youth last and love still breed,
Had joys no date nor age no need,
Then these delights my mind might move
To live with thee and be thy love.
personification
synecdoche

personification
allusion
Philomel
Greek goddess turned into a bird named Philomela
Philomela was raped by her sister's husband.
The gods turned Tereus, Philomela, and Procne into birds
Philomela a swallow
Tereus a hawk
Procne a nightingale
Roman writers write of Philomela being the nightingale and her sister the swallow
Also an instrument possibly played by a shepherd
The Passionate Shepherd to His Love
synecdoche
hyperbole
Made up of 6 quatrains
Bibliography
http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Pa-Pr/Philomela.html

http://www.biography.com/people/christopher-marlowe-9399572
http://www.wikiart.org/en/search/pastoral/1
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