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Opinion Essay

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by

Tadeo Helou

on 19 June 2014

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Transcript of Opinion Essay

Opinion Essays
Structure
Opinion essays are formal in style. They require your opinion on a topic which must be clearly stated and supported by reasons. It is necessary to include the opposing viewpoint in another paragraph.
A) An introduction paragraph in which you state the topic and your opinion.
B) A main body which consists of two or more paragraphs. Each paragraph should present a separate viewpoint supported by your reasons. Another paragraph giving the opposing viewpoint and reasons may be included.
C) A conclusion in which you restate your opinion using different words.
Example
Overview
Points to Consider
First decide wether you agree or disagree with the subject of the topic and make a list of your points and reasons.
Write well-developed paragraphs consisting of more than once sentence.
Begin each paragraph with a topic sentence which summarises what the paragraph is about.
Linking words should be used throughout your composition.
Useful Language
To express opinion: I believe, In my opinion, I think, In my view, I strongly believe, It seems to me (that).
To list points: In the first place, first of all, to start with, Firstly, to begin with.
To add more points: what is more, another major reason, also, furthermore, moreover, in addition to this/that, besides, apart from this.
To introduce contrasting points: It is argued that, People argue that, Opponents of this view say, There are people who oppose, Contrary to what most people believe.
To introduce examples: for example, for instance, such as, in particular, especially.
To conclude: To sum up, All in all, All things considered, Taking everything into account.
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