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Exiting Commercial Sexual Exploitation

Understanding nuances of the phenomenon across cultures. Talk presented at CSWE APM 2013 in Dallas, TX in November 2013.
by

Bincy Wilson

on 18 March 2014

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Transcript of Exiting Commercial Sexual Exploitation

How do service providers within different cultural contexts understand the exit process of women from CSE?
Commercial sexual exploitation (CSE)
global issue, gross human rights violation (Bertone, 2004; Gallagher, 2001)
Does not distinguish between adult / child (Jeffreys, 2000)
Total number forcibly sexually exploited ~4.5 million
98% female and 21% less than 18 years of age (ILO, 2012)
Transient nature + Stigma = Little knowledge on exit phenomenon
Transcultural nuances when developing interventions & providing services
What the data shows
Trafficking for all forms of sexual exploitation where an individual is commoditized
No longer sexually exploited for financial gain
Organizational
Services
Does the perception of service providers and culture have a bearing on services provided?
What are the variances in the needs and barriers encountered by the women?
Research Questions
Design & Sample
Qualitative design
Service providers from agencies providing services to women in/exiting sex trade
10 agencies in California, U.S.
San Francisco, Oakland, Los Angeles & San Diego
10 agencies in India
Bangalore, Mumbai, Goa, Delhi & Kolkata
Data Collection & Analysis
In depth interviewing
Service providers from various hierarchical levels
43 in India
31 in U.S.
Administered in English, Hindi and Kannada – transcribed into English
Thematic and content analysis conducted based on the major themes
Comparative analysis to identify cross-cultural similarities and differences
How did we go about
Age: 20 - 70
Gender
31 Females
Education
High School & below – 11
Undergraduate/Graduate - 20
Demographics
Demographics
Age: 20 - 65
Gender:
32 Female
10 Male
1 Transgender
Education:
No Schooling – 3
High School & below – 9
Undergraduate/Graduate - 31
Time spent in
Sex Trade
Mode of Entry
Type of
Exploitation
External
Support
Factors
Influencing
Exit
Individual
Desire
Age of the individual
Life Changing
Event
External
Interventions
Age Out
Death
Exit
Patterns
Remain in
Industry
Self Rescued
Transition
within
Industry
RQ1 - Exit Phenomenon
RQ2 - Barriers
Individual
Trauma
Mental health conditions
Structural
Permanent criminal records

RQ2 - Barriers
Societal
Normalization
Harassment
Discrimination
Misconceptions
Relational
Exploitation by family
Absence of male support
RQ2 - Needs
Positive networks & role models
De-addiction
Legal assistance
Education
Harm reduction services
RQ3- Impact of Perception
& Culture
Providing trauma specific treatment
De-addiction
Assistance with schooling & skill development
Peer mentoring
Harm reduction services
RQ2 - Needs
Empathy from society
Family support
Assistance with child care
Presence of male partner
Assistance from government
Removed from exploitative environment
RQ3- Impact of Perception & Culture
Assistance with children’s education & care
Employment for second generation
Working with family members
Micro-credit financing or employment options
Finding a partner or marriage
Rescuing women from red-light districts
Key Takeaways
Variances in societies affect exit, needs & barriers
Perception & culture
influences services
bincywil@buffalo.edu
Exiting Commercial Sexual Exploitation
Bincy Wilson, PhD (c)
Barbara A. Rittner, PhD
Filomena M. Critelli, PhD
Exit Process
CSE
Agencies providing health care, case management, advocacy
RQ2 - Barriers
Commonalities
Individual
Behavioral issues, addictions, unaware of services
Structural
Lack of education/alternatives, poor economic condition
Relational
Attachment to perpetrator, lack of positive connection
Societal
Stigma
Inefficient
Services
Forced interventions, lack of designated services/qualified professionals
RQ2 - Needs
Commonalities
Health
Physical
&
Mental
Emotional
Support
&
Motivation
Stabilization
Basic needs, Safety & Housing
Employment
Financial stability
Organizational Services
Support & Non judgmental attitude
Understanding nuances
of the
phenomenon across cultures

Understand phenomenon from women's perspective
Evaluate/modify existing interventions
Appropriate training, education & sensitization of service providers & community
Future work
Background
Participating organizations
India & U.S.
Grants
Fahs-Beck Foundation
Gender Institute, UB
A big thanks to...

http://goo.gl/F1T0U2
View this presentation at
Full transcript