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Copy of SONNET 130

Shakespeare's Sonnet 130 and explication
by

Emma Fullbrook

on 1 May 2012

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Transcript of Copy of SONNET 130

Sonnet 130 (1609) Shakespeare (1564–1616) My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun,
Coral is far more red than her lips' red.
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun,
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks.
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
    And yet, by Heaven, I think my love as rare
    As any she belied with false compare. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun,
Coral is far more red than her lips' red.
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun,
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks.
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
    And yet, by Heaven, I think my love as rare
    As any she belied with false compare. Vocabulary “belied with false compare” to give false impression of something, to disguise; to fail to justify a claim or expectation Here, the line means to imply lies with dramatic imagery for the beloved Imagery “her breasts are dun” marked by dullness,
or of a brownish colour The Basics Sonnet 130 is a sonnet. The rhyme scheme follows the typical Shakesperian sonnet,
ABAB CDCD EFEF GG. My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun,
Coral is far more red than her lips' red.
If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun,
If hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head.
I have seen roses damasked, red and white,
But no such roses see I in her cheeks.
And in some perfumes is there more delight
Than in the breath that from my mistress reeks.
I love to hear her speak, yet well I know
That music hath a far more pleasing sound.
I grant I never saw a goddess go,
My mistress, when she walks, treads on the ground.
    And yet, by Heaven, I think my love as rare
    As any she belied with false compare. Interpretation "Sun", "coral", "snow", &c. commonly used in poetry The speaker says, essentially, that this chick is ugly, smells bad, her voice ain't much, and she's nothing special. But the speaker's love for this girl is as precious and wholehearted as any love described by fantastic and false imagery. Here, though Shakey describes the girl as plain, actively telling us that she has no especially redeeming qualities. The poem, then, is a satire, or parody, on the traditions of the time, while holding onto the central love theme The sonnet is about love, but not the way we imagine it to be! Lesson Objectives:
To identify the form of Sonnet 130.
To look closely at the imagery used.
To compare the poem to another sonnet. "Coral is far more red than her lips" Her lips are pale, not a beautiful deep red Starter activity. This poem is about love and writing- how comparisons used by lovers (and poets) are often unrealistic.
Make a list in your books of all the romantic comparisons that the poet denies.
Example:
‘Her eyes are not like the sun.’ Rhythm This poem is written in Iambic Pentameter.
5 feet (pairs of syllables)
Each foot has an unstressed , followed by a stressed syllable.
This gives the poem a regular rhythm Which word in line eight is particularly strong ? ‘reeks’
Effect: to emphasise that the poem is a parody of romantic sonnets, it mocks the language (beautiful is replaced with ugly: ‘wires’ and ‘reeks’) How does this compare to sonnet 18? Use the text of Sonnet 18, and the copy of Sonnet 130 I've given you, in pairs write a P.E.E paragraph comparing two specific images in the poems.

A shortened example:

Sonnet 18: 'Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?'
Sonnet 130: 'My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun'
Although both of these lines refer to the sun, sonnet 130 denies that the object of his desire is as bright or beautiful as the sun. Learning Outcomes:
I will understand how a sonnet is structured.
I will be able to identify the imagery used and talk about the effect it has on our ideas as readers.
I will compare this poem to another sonnet and think about how they are different. Fit the paired syllables (beats) of the poem into boxes like this: Each box is a foot.
Each foot has an unstressed and a stressed syllable
Each line has 5 feet.
 
  If snow be white why then her breasts are dun; If hairs be wires black wires grow on her head;   the poet's strength of feeling? What words in line 13 express 'by heaven' He tells us that his feelings are
just as strong as anyone elses. What is a sonnet? Come up with a definition with your
partner- you have 30 SECONDS!!
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