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Train the Trainer

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on 27 July 2015

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Transcript of Train the Trainer

Learning Styles and Tools
Instructional Design
Presentation Skills for Trainers
Adult Learning Principles
'Trainer' vs 'Teacher' or 'Presenter'
Aranca Trainer Certification
July 2015
Train the Trainer
Introduction to TTT
Delivery Cosiderations

Steps
Tell Them, Show Them, Let Them

Preparation
Know far more than you will ever use
Anticipate all activities will take longer than planned

Presentation
Limit segments to 90 minutes before break
Conduct content rich segments early on session
Build activities into each segment
Include visuals and hands on opportunities
Provide for repetition and reinforcement
Project enthusiasm, confidence and encouragement

Participation
Vary dynamics -Entire group, table group, triads, pairs
Vary approach -Questions, discussions, think/write/share
Vary activities-Quiz, flip charting, reading, demonstrations, reports
Vary recognition -Thank you, applause, strength feedback

TTT Structure
Learning Objectives
Understand and apply adult learning principles to conduct
high impact, interactive training programs

Discover
training tools and techniques
to accommodate various learning styles

Ensure
maximum knowledge and skills transfer
and retention, by creating a complete learning program

"Trainers should encourage
more participation
, sessions are too one-way."
What Trainees Said
"Handouts, examples, case studies and assignments
should be given to help retain concepts."
"Trainers could use a
range of training tools
rather than only PPT and lecture to make the sessions more interesting."
"Trainers are very
knowledgeable and helpful."
Abilities of a Trainer
A Trainer demonstrates the ability to:

Deliver presentations that adults find
interesting and relevant
to their daily lives.

Provide an atmosphere of
acceptance and approval
through feedback and praise.

Create a
participatory environment
in large and small group discussion.

Coach
to
close the gap
between desired performance and actual performance.

Facilitate the
transfer of learning
to create business value.

Use
interpersonal skills
that support a positive learning environment.

A Trainer Must Build Trust and Credibility
What we do …
What things might people see you do that indicates you live the basic principles and concepts of the training programs you deliver?

How we look …
What impressions do you create with your acceptance?

What we say …
Describe a time when your ability to communicate an idea with clarity and focus made a difference to a colleague business relationship or family member.

How we say it …
How would you describe your tone of voice and your ability to use voice inflection?

Presentation Skills for Trainers
3 V's
- Congruence

Visual
- Body Lanuage, Eye Contact, Energy and Enthusiasm

Vocal
- Tone of Voice, Modulation, Strenght and Impact

Verbal
- Choice of Words, Clarity of Message
Ten Tips for Presenting
Avoid jargon
and words that may be unfamiliar to the class members.

Use descriptive language
and detail to paint a picture.

Maintain eye contact
with class members, including those seated beyond the first few rows.

Be aware of your “default” facial expression.
When you are thinking do you have a tendency to frown, look up, or away?

Studies have shown that adults need to see the
palms of our hands
during presentations. Hands held behind the back or in the fig leaf position may detract from the message or send a conflicting message.

Be clear.
Careless enunciation may create the impression that other areas are careless or sloppy as well.

Project your voice
in a strong clear tone, appropriate for the size of the room and seating arrangement.

Avoid speaking in a monotone
. Vocal variety can be accomplished in many ways by raising and lowering pitch and adjusting the rate of speech.

Link gestures and words for congruency.
If you say an object is large, show us through gestures how large. If you say you are excited, the facial expression and eyes should convey the same excitement.

Avoid pacing.
Make your movement purposeful by moving to a different location only when the message moves on to the next point.

Ten Tips for Questioning, Listening and Responding
Ask a question and
give them time to think.
Don’t rush to fill the silence.

We don’t always have to have the answer. Sometimes it is appropriate to
offer to find the answer and get back to them
or turn the question back to the group for ideas.

Don’t grade questionings
by saying, “That’s a good question.”

We want to thank those who respond to our questions by saying things like,
“That’s it” or “Sure.”
We don’t want to say “thank you” to everyone or applaud every response.

If one person answers a question with an incorrect or inappropriate answer help that person to save face.
Never say you are wrong.
Take any part of the response that is correct and edit the rest to a correct statement.

Our voice, face and body language must tell our class members that we want questions and responses.
Keep the tone friendly and smile.
Making eye contact is critical to gauge where the energy is in the group and when it may be time to move on.

When we receive a question, we must make certain we have
fully understood the question
before answering.

Avoid asking questions that offer a “yes/no” response
unless it is to vote or take a quick survey of the group.

Prepare questions in advance
to stimulate thinking, create interest and add transfer of training value.

Use a
variety of questions
to create that participatory environment in which adults learn best.

Offer
encouragement

Provide a
feeling of victory

Reassure participants
that they are making progress toward objectives

Keep the training session moving at a
brisk pace

Help participants
relate
the training
to their professional goals

Adults are accustomed to being
autonomous and self-directed.
They have
expectations
and wants that need to be met.

Classroom application:
Allow your participants to create their own ground rules at the beginning of the training course. Let them roll dice or choose a playing card to determine break times, rather than you dictating the amount of time. Finally, since adult learners are self-directed,
allow them to discover things on their own
and even make mistakes.

SELF DIRECTION
Adults see learning as a means to an end, rather than an end in itself.
They must know
what there is to gain
, and they must see progress being made.

Classroom Application:
Point out why it’s important
for the trainees to learn the content. Focus on how they’ll benefit personally, and what will happen back on the job if they, or their peers, don’t learn how to do the job properly.

BENEFIT
Adults want courses that focus on
real-life problems and tasks
rather than academic material. A strong how-to focus is desired. They become restless if their time is being wasted.

Classroom Application:
Train on
tasks rather than topics.
Maintain a brisk pace and schedule, omitting nice-to-know information—focus on what the learners need to know!


RELEVANCE
Adults bring considerable experience with them. They like to
speak, participate, and contribute
to the proceedings. They dislike long lectures.

Classroom Application:
Harness the experience
of your adult learners. Incorporate peer-mentoring by pairing up those with more experience with the newer, less knowledgeable trainees. Use icebreakers that will reveal shared experiences (e.g. give learners five minutes to list things that they all have in common).


EXPERIENCE
Adults have something to lose. They have a
strong need to maintain their self-esteem
, and need to feel heard.

Classroom Application:
Make sure that
adequate climate building
is done before working on the course content (e.g. icebreakers, energizers, and brainteasers). Most people need to feel safe, secure, and comfortable before they can give their full attention to learning. Create early practice sessions that are easier and more prompted than later sessions. As learners gain proficiency, more complexities can be added to the practice session.

SELF-ESTEEM
Adults are
accustomed to being active.
They should be given an opportunity for active participation whenever possible.

Classroom Application:
Build practice sessions throughout the course
rather than just at the end, and use frequent small-group sessions. Include opportunities for learners to express themselves, work together, and be active.
How many of the seven principles are you currently implementing? What additional tips do you have for incorporating them? How are you building the above principles into your virtual classroom trainings? I look forward to hearing from you!


PARTICIPATION
Adults have a
here-and-now
viewpoint. They wish to focus on current issues, rather than material that may be useful in the distant future.

Classroom Application:
Only teach tasks that the attendees will use in their
current role
. Ensure your trainees use the skills
within 30 days
of the training by following up with their manager or supervisor. Studies show that when learning a new skill, if it’s not used within 30 days,
ninety percent of it will be lost.

TIME ORIENTATION
Program Design
Session Plan
Instrucitonal Design
Analysis
Design
Develop
Implement
Evaluate
Pre-Work
Reading
Assignment
Reports
Queries

Post-Work
Program
Training
Activites
Case Studies
Assessment


Presentations
Assessments
Feedback


Opening
Agenda
Objective
Tell Them
and ask them
Show Them
by doing it with them
Let Them
and debrief with them
Recap
Key Take Away
When?
First 5 Mins

Why?
Sets the tone and
the environment

How?
Ice Breaker
Startling Statement
Quotations
Statistics
Mysterious Statement
Compliment
Dramatic Incident

Opening
When?
Next 5 Mins

Why?
Sets expectations

How?
-->
Agenda
Objective
When?
Next 20 Mins

Why?
So the the message is conveyed/
concept/knowledge is shared

How?
Ask what they currently know
PPT
Discussions
Brainstorm/Mindmap

When?
Next 20 Mins

Why?
So they can see the application of the knowledge/skills

How?
Demonstration
Case Study
Group Activity
Video
Role Play lead by trainer
Tell Them
and ask them
Show Them
by doing it with them
When?
Next 20 Mins

Why?
So they can apply the learning

How?
Assignment
Assessment
Discussions
Activity
Teachback
Role Play
Let Them
and Debrief With Them
Writing Learning Objectives Aligned with the Learning Goal
When?
Next 5 Mins

Why?
Reiterate Learning

How?
Brainstorm
Quiz

Recap
When?
Last 5 Mins

Why?
Gauge success of session and transfer of learning

How?
Discussion
Take Away
Design your program using different learning styles
Auditory
Lectures
Audio
Visual
Presentation
Video
Demonstration
White Board
Kinesthetic
Assignments
Examples
Case studies
Activity

Linguistic
Participant Manuals
Notes
Assignments
Flip Charts

Interpersonal
Group activity
Q&A
Brainstorm
Learning Evaluation
Train the Trainer
Workshop
Train the Trainer
Coaching
C2C Batch 1
Train the Trainer
Certification
C2C Batch 2
Create Learning Objectives for your training program
http://prezi.com/5ye8po_hmikp/10-most-common-rookie-presentation-mistakes/#

Create an outline of your training program
How would you evaluate your program and the learning?
What is YOUR learning style?
What's in it for me?
Full transcript