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Childhood Obesity

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Elizabeth Wright

on 16 April 2013

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Transcript of Childhood Obesity

Sharbel, Alex, Ashley, Elizabeth and Kathryn Childhood Obesity What is Obesity? Conclusion A child is considered obese when they have a body mass index (BMI) that is in the 95 percentile or above for their age. Doctors also consider body fat percentage, eating habits and family history before diagnosing a child. (OAC) Facts and Statistics “Because of the increasing rates of obesity, unhealthy eating habits and physical inactivity, we may see the first generation that will be less healthy and have a shorter life expectancy than their parents." -Surgeon General Richard Carmona ("Overweight in Children.")
The total cost related to childhood obesity is about $254 billion a year ("Overweight & Obesity.")
If trends in the growth of obesity continue, total healthcare costs related to obesity could
reach $861 to $957 billion by 2030, which would account for 16% to 18% of US health expenditures ("Overweight & Obesity.") Facts and Statistics Cont. "Childhood Obesity Facts." Nutrition, Physical Activity, & Obesity. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 19 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.

"Overweight in Children." Weight Management. American Heart Association, 16 Jan. 2013. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.

"Overweight & Obesity." Statistical Fact Sheet 2013 Update. American Heart Association, n.d. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.

"Obesity Related Statistics in American." American Health. Get America Fit, n.d. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.

Lauer, R. M. and Clarke, W. R. “Childhood Risk Factors for High Adults Blood Pressure: The Muscantine Study.” American Academy of Pediatrics. Vol. 84 No. 4 (1989). Web. 14 April 2013.

CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Causes and Consequences. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 27 April 2012. Web. 14 April, 2013.

VAXA. Childhood and Obesity. VAXA International. Web. 14 April, 2013.

"Obesity Action Coalition." . N.p., 13 Apr 2013. Web. 16 Apr 2013. <http://www.obesityaction.org/understanding-obesity-in-children>."

"Childhood Obesity." Mayo Clinic. n.d. Web. 14 April 2013.

Finkelstein, Eric A., et al. "Obesity and Severe Obesity Forecasts Through 2030." American Journal of Preventative Medicine 42.6 (2012) : 563-570. Print.

"Obesity in Young Children: Impact and Intervention." nh.gov. National Institute for Health Care Management, August 2004. Web. 14 April 2013.

Sachs, Andrea. "Childhood Obesity and Diabetes: Two Sides of the Same Coin." Time 27 Apr. 2010. Online.

"Heart Disease Risk Factors For Children and Teenagers." Texas Heart Institute. n.d. Web. 14 April 2013.

Belluck, Pam. "Child Obesity Seen as Warning of Heart Disease." New York Times 11 Nov. 2008. Print. Works Cited We believe that solution 2 would be
best option for America in the future. Obesity is the #2 cause of preventable death in the United States ("Obesity Related Statistics in American." )
Today, about one in three American kids and teens is overweight or obese, nearly triple the rate in 1963 ("Overweight in Children.")
Children struggling with obesity are likely to struggle with it as adults. Long term affects of obesity include heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke, several types of cancer, and osteoarthritis ("Childhood Obesity Facts.")
Childhood obesity has been linked to higher and earlier death rates in adulthood ("Overweight in Children.") Health Problems Caused by Obesity Diabetes
Heart Disease
High Blood Pressure Other Effects Projections Children who are obese are 70 percent more likely to become obese adults.
In 2030, it is projected that approximately 50 percent of Americans will be obese (BMI at or above 30)
In 2030, 8 percent of Americans are projected to be severely obese (BMI at or above 40) (Finkelstein, et al.) Ethical Principles Acknowledge how an action produces beneficial consequences for society.
Assist others in pursuing their best interests.
Do not infringe on a person's freedoms over his/her actions or body.
Acknowledge a person's right to life, information, privacy, free expression, and safety.
Help those in need. Solutions Solution 1 Create higher taxes for families with obese children because their healthcare costs more. Solution 2 Adjust regulations for school lunches and physical activity. Solution 3 Change nothing. Principals Respected Principals Respected Principals Respected Principals Threatened Principals Threatened Principals Threatened Principals Violated Principals Violated Principals Violated Diabetes Heart Disease High Blood Pressure Increase in health care costs
In 2018 national estimated costs of obesity will be 147 billion (CDC)
Academics
Psychological (VAXA) Acknowledge how an action produces beneficial consequences for society.
Help those in need. Assist others in pursuing their best interests. Do not infringe on a person's freedoms over his/her actions or body.
Acknowledge a person's right to life, information, privacy, free expression, and safety. Acknowledge how an action produces beneficial consequences for society.
Assist others in pursuing their best interests.
Help those in need. Do not infringe on a person's freedoms over his/her actions or body.
Acknowledge a person's right to life, information, privacy, free expression, and safety. Do not infringe on a person's freedoms over his/her actions or body.
Acknowledge a person's right to life, information, privacy, free expression, and safety. Acknowledge how an action produces beneficial consequences for society.
Assist others in pursuing their best interests.
Help those in need. None None High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) - “A common condition in which the force of the blood against your artery walls is high enough that it may eventually cause health problems, such as heart disease” (Mayo Clinic).
Obesity can cause high blood pressure (Lauer and Clarke). Childhood obesity predisposes children to Type 2 Diabetes.
As the amount of children with diabetes rises, so does the number of people with Type 2 Diabetes.
Diabetes can lead to heart attack, stroke, kidney failure, and many other complications (NIHCM).
A new study shows that, in children, diabetes is harder to treat and progresses at a faster rate (Sachs). In a population-based sample of 5- to 17-year-olds, 70% of obese youth had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease (Texas Heart Institute).
Cardiovascular disease generally refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke (Texas Heart Institute).
A study was presented at the American Heart Association November 2008 conference in New Orleans and found that the thickness of artery walls of children and teenagers who are obese or have high cholesterol resembled the thickness of artery walls of an average 45-year-old (Belluck).
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