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Break Out 2012

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Jordan Orsak

on 14 November 2012

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Transcript of Break Out 2012


Jordan Orsak Cased Hole Breakout Presentation September 25, 2012 The quick Introduction to what landed me here in front of you today. Graduated in 2011 Enjoyed 3-Event water skiing... Minored in Business Administration
With a specialty in Marketing and Sales. East Bernard TX Joined Team Halliburton: May 25, 2011
Position: Operator Assistant-1
Promoted: November 17, 2011-Engineer
Graduated TTP School : March 30, 2012
Graduated Engineering School: April 2, 2012 SAFTY MOMENT GENERAL SAFTEY EXPLOSIVE
SAFETY RADIATION
SAFTY SERVICE QUALITY CASED HOLE
LOGGING SYSTEM CABLE CARE
DEPTH CONTROL PRESSURE
CONTROL PUMPDOWNS LOGGING TOOLS The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) conservatively estimates that 100,000 police-reported crashes are the direct result of driver fatigue each year, resulting in an estimated 1,500 deaths, 71,000 injuries, and $12.5 billion in monetary losses. Driving Drowsy Driving Drowsy WARNING SIGNS
There are several warning signs of fatigue; however, we often don’t understand them or worse
yet, choose to ignore them. Some of the warning signs include:

Feeling sleepy or tired
Being unaware of your environment or not always knowing where you are
Erratic driving similar to drunk driving
Unable to get comfortable
Tired or burning eyes
Rubbing your neck or face to wake up
Driving off the shoulder or crossing the center line
Any of these symptoms may result in loss of vehicle control.
There are several warning signs of fatigue; however, we often don’t understand them or worse
yet, choose to ignore them. Some of the warning signs include:

Feeling sleepy or tired
Being unaware of your environment or not always knowing where you are
Erratic driving similar to drunk driving
Unable to get comfortable
Tired or burning eyes
Rubbing your neck or face to wake up
Driving off the shoulder or crossing the center line
Any of these symptoms may result in loss of vehicle control. WARNING SIGNS DRIVING... TREAT IT LIKE YOUR JOB.
BECAUSE IT IS... DRIVING... TREAT IT LIKE YOUR JOB.
BECAUSE IT IS... DRIVING... TREAT IT LIKE YOUR JOB.
BECAUSE IT IS... Drive only when rested. Keep your mind alert. Listen to talk shows or up-tempo music. Have some sleep or exercise first. Change position frequently, keeping your head up and shoulders back. Chew gum. Actively watch road signs and traffic. Every couple of hours pull off the road for a break, exercise and fresh air. Don't rely on coffee! It only works in the beginning.. Drink water Choose high-protein snacks over heavy or fatty foods such as fries Avoid alcohol (obviously) but most importantly medications (including cold remedies) Drive defensively. Be prepared to prevent collisions in spite of the actions of others-including drivers around you who may be drowsy. General Safety JSA • The Job Safety Analysis (JSA) is an important accident prevention tool

• It is designed to identify potential hazards before the job and before they become accidents

• It should be kept up to date, if a procedure changes, so should the JSA

• Now is a good time to make sure everyone is on the same page!

• Anyone on location has the right to use Stop Work Authority if he/she sees an unsafe act or potentially unsafe act General Safety Hand Safety • No more cotton gloves on location!

• Use the appropriate gloves for the job
:Impact gloves when lifting, breaking guns down, etc.
:Large rubber gloves when cleaning parts or handling diesel
:Latex gloves when handling exposed explosives such as primacord

• Always be watching for pinch points NO GO General Safety Dropped Objects •Stay clear of overhead loads

•Use available tools to prevent dropped objects

•Be cautious of dropped objects at all times

•Even a spent gun falling of a stand is a dropped object
• The Explosive User in Charge is RESPONSIBLE for safe explosive operations at the well site.

• The Explosive User in Charge is RESPONSIBLE for connecting detonators.

• The Explosive User in Charge is RESPONSIBLE for understanding and implementing all applicable laws concerning transportation, storage, handling, and disposal requirements for each class of explosive. EXPLOSIVE SAFTY
EXPLOSIVE USER IN CHARGE EXPLOSIVE SAFTY
Types of Explosives EXPLOSIVE OPERATIONS
Ten Important Rules for Explosive Operations 1. The job supervisor MUST be a qualified “EXPLOSIVE USER-IN-CHARGE L&P ELECTRIC DETONATORS (EUIC)”.
a. The following employees are the only employees permitted to arm or disarm explosive devices.
Current Explosive User in Charge. When loading select fire guns, employees who have completed specialized select fire gun loading training. However, they MAY NOT insert the bottom detonator in a gun unless they are preparing to go in a well. 2. Before any explosive activity can be initiated, the following steps MUST be completed:
Safety meeting conducted.
Posting of “Danger Explosive” signs.
Stray voltage and ground cable conductivity test conducted as specified in the “Explosive
Safety and Operation Manual”.
Ground and Potential monitor cables connected.
All radio transmitters, handheld transceivers, radios, radiophones, cellular phone, welding equipment, topdrive, and cathodic protection devices turned off. (If RED detonators are used on current operations, some of these activities may be permitted as specified in the “Explosive Safety and Operation Manual”)
Remove only explosives required for IMMIDIATE use from the magazine.
Move non-essential personnel away from the unit, explosive area and “Line of Fire”. 3. NEVER apply any type of power through or to an explosive device while it is on the surface. 4. Do not arm explosive devices until the Safety Key attached to the armband is removed from the unit and attached to the arm of the EUIC for everyone to see. 5. Do not arm explosive devices until you have verified no one is in the instrument unit and all personnel and equipment, including guns and explosives, are clear of the “Line of Fire” 6. Always arm explosive devices Electrically first, then Ballistically. 7. If an armed explosive device is on the surface, within 200 feet from the surface, or sea floor, the Safety Key, attached to the armband, MUST remain outside of the unit with WPS personnel and visible to everyone. 8. Do not perform explosive operations during lighting storms, electrical storms, dust, or snowstorms. 9. NEVER troubleshoot an armed explosive device. 10. In the event of a misfire or delay, the “Explosive User in Charge” MUST immediately disarm the explosive device. Disarm Ballistically first, then
Electrically. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Low Explosives
Deflagrate, not detonate
Deflagration, the rate of the soundwave created
Must be confined to do useful work
Sensitive to heat and Spark
Produce large amount of gas
Ex. Power charges for setting tools Primary High Explosives
Used as initiation explosives
Extremely sensitive to heat, friction, electricity
Ex. Detonators (A140's) Secondary High Explosives
Most powerful we use
Generate large amounts of pressure at high velocity
Relatively insensitive to mechanical and electrical shock
Ex. Shape Charges/Det Cord – RDX, HMX, PETN and HNS Explosive Storage TYPE I TYPE II TYPE III Permanent magazines for the storage of explosives. Mobile, portable magazine for the storage of explosives. Attended temporary storage of explosives. Magazines are to be kept locked and secured at all times, except when items are being placed in or removed from them. Detonators and Igniters must not be stored with Shaped Charges and Primacord. Shaped Charge Penetration Sheet Explosives Safety Transportation
Process and Suggestions Classification & Transport Transportation Classes Transportation Sheet Step 1 Explosives Safety Transportation Most commonly used detonators in Alice TX Most commonly used detonators in Alice TX Explosives Safety Transportation Explosives Safety Transportation STRAY VOLTAGE STRAY VOLTAGE •Stray voltage procedure must be done BEFORE beginning any explosives operation
•Performed on all metallic structures that contact or may come in contact with logging unit and/or wireline
•Everything in logging unit must be turned on and key must be in either log or ccl on shooting panel
•Purpose is to determine if it is safe to proceed with electrical explosives operations
•Grounding system puts all objects that may come in contact with logging unit/wireline on same electrical potential

Note: Ground cable must be disconnected from unit during stray voltage test. Engineer
“Stand By To Check Fire”
“Check Fire Open”
“Short It Negative”
(0.8A for Resistorized Dets)
(250V for RED Dets)
“Short It Positive”
“Check Collars”
“Fire OK, Collars OK, Cable is Shorted” Operator
“Ready To Check Fire”
“Open”

“Shorted… Fire OK”

“Shorted… Fire OK”

“Checking Collars” Checking Fire Procedures Explosives Procedures on Site Explosives Procedures on Site Calculating expected current draw during Check Fire Open Calculating expected current draw during Check Fire Open I = V/R

V = 600V-(during check fire open)
Resistance line + Resistance of CCL Coil
70 + 1500 = 1570

Thus (70r+1500r)/600v

Expected during check fire open.
= 0.38A Doing it right the 1st time! CSP in Safe, power down surface system and remove all personnel from logger

Remove key from logger and place on EUIC arm
Connect blasters meter to through wire and ground at bottom of gun string

Connect through wire, check stray voltage, check continuity and isolation

Remove detonator from magazine and place inside detonator safety tube

Cut excess wire one at a time, positive first, then ground
Check resistance of detonator, check integrity of ground wire, check that switch is open (if applicable)

Connect detonator electrically, then ballistically.

Check stray voltage at bottom of CCL/GPLT prior to attaching guns
Check continuity after attaching guns

Clear line of fire

Unshunt/arm bottom most gun of gun string Explosives SafetyArming/Disarming Doing it right the 1st time! CHECK FIRE Dis Arming Radiation Safety Definitions Radiation Safety Definitions Radiation – the emission of waves and/or particles through matter or space

Curie (Ci) – a unit used to measure the activity of a radioactive source, equal to 37 Billion disintegration’s per second

Radiation Absorbed Dose (RAD) – a measure of the energy deposited into matter

Roentgen Equivalent Man (REM) – a measure of the biological effect radiation has on a man

Half Life – The time in which one half of the radioactive substance disintegrates into another form

ALARA – As Low As Reasonably Achievable Radiation – the emission of waves and/or particles through matter or space

Curie (Ci) – a unit used to measure the activity of a radioactive source, equal to 37 Billion disintegration’s per second

Radiation Absorbed Dose (RAD) – a measure of the energy deposited into matter

Roentgen Equivalent Man (REM) – a measure of the biological effect radiation has on a man

Half Life – The time in which one half of the radioactive substance disintegrates into another form

ALARA – As Low As Reasonably Achievable Radiation Safety Definitions Time and Exposure are directly proportional
Exposure = Dose Rate x Time Distance
Inverse Square Law
I2 = I1 x (D1)2 / (D2)2 Shielding
Neutrons Gamma Beta Alpha
Water Lead Tin Air Double you distance quarter your douse.
Tripple your distance tenth your dose. I1 = Initial Intensity
I2 = Initial Distance
D1 = Secondary Intensity
D2 = Secondary Distance Radiation Sources Am241Be
Neutron Source
Energy – 4.6 MeV
Half Life – 458 Years Radiation Sources Cs137
Gamma Source
Energy – 0.662 MeV
Half Life – 30.2 Years Thorium Blanket
Gamma Correlation Calibration Source Radiation Safety Personnel Monitoring Program
General Public - 100 mREM/year (typically)
Employees w/ Awareness Training - 500 mREM/year
Employees w/ WPS Required Training - 4000 mREM/year Radiation Transportation Radiation Transportation Radiation Transportation

Radiation Surveys
Before Vehicle Survey
Before Job Site Survey
Tool Survey
After Job Site Survey
Vehicle Survey Before Leaving Location
Inventory Survey (Storage)
Any Emergency Situation DOT controls transportation, labeling, packaging and classification of radioactive materials

NRC/Agreement States regulate use and storage of radioactive materials

Transport Index (TI) – The radiation level in mREM/hour at one meter from the surface of the package
Maximum TI per package is 10 and the sum of the TI cannot exceed 50 per vehicle DOT controls transportation, labeling, packaging and classification of radioactive materials

NRC/Agreement States regulate use and storage of radioactive materials

Transport Index (TI) – The radiation level in mREM/hour at one meter from the surface of the package
Maximum TI per package is 10 and the sum of the TI cannot exceed 50 per vehicle While transporting radiation limits…
200 mREM/hour on surface of package
10 mREM/hour one meter from surface of any package (TI=10)
200 mREM/hour on surface of vehicle
2 mREM/hour in all occupied positions of the vehicle
And DOT labeling… Transportation Fill our Radiation paperwork!
Bring your survey meters! Ludlum Model 2 Survey Meter Ludlum Model 12-4 Survey Meter
(Neutron) MAKE SURE IT IS THE RIGHT REVISION USDOT HAZMAT REGISTRATION NUMBER PART ONE An X should always be placed on the HM box. Fill in the number of packages transported in the appropriate spaces. On this section the drop down box will give you the option of source that you will be carrying. This is the place where you would place your Thorium Blanket. PART TWO This section you would place the reading from the survey meter. Plus the S/N and calibration date of the survey meters . This section you would place the Engineer and Crews names. This section you would place survey reading before and after the job. PART THREE
Internally developed mechanism for managing system of processes, standards, work methods, and forms used to define work within Halliburton

What’s HMS?

A mapped out set or standards and process of every job we do.

Policies, standards, derived from the foundational Business Code of Conduct. 7 Mainstay Processes
Developing Solutions
Prepare Resources
Mobilize Resources
Perform Service/Deliver Products
Demobilize Resources
Complete Reports/Field Tickets
Review Performance HMS Local Work Method Local Work Method Local Work Method Job Site Audit 33 check points for you to be graded on. Depth Panel Shooting Panel CHIP Panel RMPC Ruggedized Rack-Mounted Portable Computer

Platform for Warrior Logging Software

Intel or AMD processor

Custom vibration absorbing mounting brackets for internal components

2 x 60 GB SATA mirrored hard drives

DVD/CD Drive

1 GB DDR2 RAM (2 x 512 MB Modules)

4 Port USB Hub

1 Motherboard Mounted Ethernet Card

1 PCI Ethernet Card

Intel PCI Express Dual Head Graphics Display Adapter Printrex Thermal Plotter
Uses Thermal Fanfold or Thermal Roll Scratch Log Paper
Calibrated through Warrior software
Either connected directly to RMPC or through print server
Print server allows for multiple plotters to be installed and communicates via CAT5 cable Warrior Depth is always zeroed at KB or Drill Floor
Logging Jobs (ex. RCBL or CAST-M)
Zero depth at bottom of tool string

Shooting CCL (ex. Pump Down Operations)
Zero depth at CCL sensor

Gamma Perforator (ex. GPLT or GPST)
Zero depth at gamma sensor Tool Zero Tool Delay It is imperative to use the correct sensor offsets on every tool! The two things you can not change once filled out. Date Truck Number Signed with employee ID
10,000 fine if not hand written in ink! During operations all explosives trash should be thrown away in a separate bin.

Engineers should confirm reliving engineer agrees with the passed down explosives before leaving location. During operations all explosives trash should be thrown away in a separate bin.

Engineers should confirm reliving engineer agrees with the passed down explosives before leaving location. Megger Only used by engineers.

Should be kept lock inside engineers truck/darkroom.

Never used with explosives.

Used to check leakage.

Wirleine: 50Mega Ohm's of leakage
Quick Change: Infinite leakage

New OEB (electronic megger should be painted RED) Simpson Meeter Blasters Meeter Used to check leakage Should be completed
before leaving the shop. http://halworld.corp.halliburton.com/divisions/wps/default.aspx?pageid=21535 CPI: Correction, Prevention, improvement.

The CPI system is comprised of processes and tools designed to help focus clients, management, and/or service providers on performance improvements. Maintenance Notification Form's If you ever have problems on site with no NPT Made to infor TEC's of logger issues Help to keep down CPI's while still reporting problems
A slightly modified version of HMS outlining how our clients and customers wish for jobs to be performed in our local work area. No Primary Explosives No Primary Explosives No Primary Explosives No Primary Explosives Finding Explosives used by Halliburton Always use an entry cone.

Make sure there is no lip between the lubricator and entry cone.

Both ID's should be the same!

Limit time on suspended loads

Third Part PCE companies are required to provide these. Entry Cone and Dropped Objects Anyone has the ability to STOP THE JOB Its your responsibility! Do not use cheater pipes! With aluminum winches they will shatter.

With metal winches they will bind or slip. Entry Cone and Dropped Objects General Safety Safety is everyone’s responsibility.

It is important for the Field professional to ensure that all safety precautions are followed.

If we do not follow the safety guidelines then accidents can happen. The results could range from minor to fatal. Safety is everyone’s responsibility.

It is important for the Field professional to ensure that all safety precautions are followed.

If we do not follow the safety guidelines then accidents can happen. The results could range from minor to fatal. 3 2 0 1 1 1 Journey Management 1 1 Always have (1800#) not cell phones! Transportation Classes
Classes
• Division 1.1 — Articles and substances having a mass explosion hazard
• Division 1.2 — Articles and substances having a projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard
• Division 1.3 — Articles and substances having a fire hazard, a minor blast hazard and/or a minor projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard
• Division 1.4 — Articles and substances presenting no significant hazard
• Division 1.5 — Very insensitive substances having a mass explosion hazard Not in Every Case... But... You can carry detonators in your truck but only in cardboard box labeled with UN number.

You can carry guns and detonators on the same vehicle with 24in separation

You can carry up to 1000LBS gross and 200LBS net explosives unplacard. (Unless its 1.1D)


You cannot carry detonators and power charges on the same vehicle Excel Converter Transportation sheet Step 2 Form Fill Out Steps Transportation sheet Step 4 Transportation sheet Step 3 Double checking your loaded gun calculations! My be used by Operators Safe to use with all EXPLOSIVES

Seal Dust and Damp Weather Proof

Battery type 9V

OSHA 29CFR 1926, 906B and MSHA 30CFR 77.1304.TT APPROVED
BATTERIES: 1.5V D, 9V

Weight 3 lbsg) http://www.specialized.net/Specialized//Assets/ProductSpecifications//080X282.PDF http://blasterstool.com/browseproducts/BLASTERS-DIGITAL-MULTIMETER--STRAY-CURRENT.html http://www.fluke.com/Fluke/usen/Support/Manuals/default.htm?ProductId=56012 Ground Cable must be rigged up IN SERIES

Monitors stray voltage, ground integrity, Stray RF

Use Test Box to make sure its working properly HANSON PM 205 Dont not check fire OPEN is NEVER performed on a GPLT Check bottom of CCL/Gamma Perf for stray voltage
Connect guns to the CCL/Gamma Perf
Conduct continuity and leakage checks
Clear the line of fire
Check for stray voltage before attaching detonator
Arm electrically then Ballistically using detonator safety tube
Place key on lead operators arm and proceed to RIH
After guns are atleast 200ft. below surface retrieve key and check the ccl/ gamma perf is operational Arming Procedure The badges are read and the dose is recorded in the employee’s permanent file. All Halliburton Employees are required to wear a Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) Badge at all times while on duty. Always use a source handling stick.

Never handle source by hand.

Always store Blanket in its correct place.

Always use correct Radiation Locks.

Always use poly plug if needed.

Source leak test every 6 months The Badges read Gamma and Neutron exposure amounts to the employee. The badges are exchanged every three months. Limits Code of Business Conduct - A guide for every Company Employee in applying legal and ethical practices to their everyday work.
Policy - Formal statements developed by top management. Policies define the intent and conduct of company business.
Business Practices - Support Company policies. They represent underlying performance expectations. Describing what to do, but not how. May apply to limited functions or geographic locations.
Standards – Establishes performance criteria.
Process Maps - Flow diagram describing activities and responsibilities for delivering products services and or process (multi-discipline). HMS BREAKDOWN Easiest measurement to acquire
Our most important measurement
Associated with all other measurements
Importance in correlation
Must be accurate within a 1’ per 10,000’
Measurement must be repeatable Depth Control Accurate Depth Measurement
Condition of opticalencoders Measuring Wheel Diameter Continuous Wheel Movement Proper Tool Zero Reference
Cable Stretch

Multiple Depth Indicators
KerrPanel Warrior Software Mechanical Backup
Z-Chart Accurate measurement is dependent upon:Continuous wheel movement
Measuring wheel diameter
Condition of optical encoder
Proper tool zero reference
Cable stretch Measuring Wheels Problems may be result of:
Worn wheelMay be due to no maintenance
Oversize wheelMay be due to ice or mud build up on wheel
No continuous wheel movement
May be due to seizing bearing or speed too fast Measuring Wheel Error Measuring Wheel Problems Measuring Wheels Wear Example:
Wheels have worn 0.01” to 7.629”
Actual Circumference = Cact = 3.14159*D = 23.967”
Kerr Panel = 10,000 ft = 5000 rev
Actual depth = Rev* Cact(5000 rev)*(23.967 in)*(0.08333 ft/in) 9986.25 ftError of 13.75 ft !!! Kerr AM5K measuring head
• Optical encoder has 1200 pulses/rev, a 2 ft circumference and therefore 600 pulses/ft• If wheels are worn, tool will be shallower than depth panel indicates• If wheels have buildup, tool will be deeper than depth panel indicates RIH with error will result in prematurely setting down:
Hitting TD
Plugs
Packers
Perf Zones If we do not delay the information coming from each sensor according to their offsets, the data from each sensor will be recorded at the wrong depth. Each sensor data will be delayed according to their offsets from the tool zero. The Maximum delay will be for the top most sensor in up Maintaining these two entities is imperative for accurate depth! Backup Encoder
Must be zeroed at tool before RIH
Backup encoder attached to AM5K Utilizes magnetics to count number of turns
Drum rib counter display in corner Depth Controls Most Common Errors? Can also be used to establish stuck points! Can also be used to establish stuck points! Weak Point Cable Care
Must correlate down hole to ensure correct depth
Correlate with either gamma or ccl

CCL Correlation
May correlate to short joint, liner top, dv tool, or other casing abnormality
Often times customer provides depth, not log

Gamma Correlation
Customer supplies log with gamma curve Correlate over 200’ section with distinctive pattern Depth Panels Kerr Panel Settings
Check before every run Edit Tensalm, Dtalrm, Overten for different applications. Choose correct line size AM5K Load Cells Should be calibrated and checked before every job.
Wheels can become worn.. Elastic Stretch ExampleStretch coefficient = 1.6 ft/kft/klbEffective Tool weight = 700 lbsDepth = 12,000 ftSurface Tension = 2000 lbsStretch = (0.5)*(1.6)*(12)*(2 + 0.7) Stretch = 25.92 ft If you are first in the well zero tool correctly
Your log is the “well bible”

If you are Not first in the well
Correlation to an open hole log
• Depth shifting

Correlation to a gamma or CCL log• Done at deepest point possible• At least 200’ of identifiable peaks To ensure your on depth. <50% Cable Breaking Strength – (Cable Weight In Mud @ Max Depth) WCM = WCA – [ (WCA – WCW) X WM/8.33] Maximum weak point value Number Of Armors Used = Max Weak Point / (Armor Strength X .85)
DON'T INCLUDE INNER ARMORS Max WP Value Stuck Point StuckPoint= Stretch Observed (ft/Klb)
------------------------------
Strech Coeff. (ft/Kft/Klb) Ex. Stuck point = Delta-Depth (ft/1000 ft) / Stretch coeff.For a deacero 9/32 line the stretch coefficient is 1.6ft/Kft/KlbStuck Point = (61/3.025) / 1.61 = 12.525 Kft Ex. TD 17,000’Fluid Density 8.4 PPG (water)Deacero 288 1ZTL-HSCable Weight Air = 158 Lbs/KftCable Weight Water = 130 Lbs/KftCable Breaking Strength = 10,400 Lbs
18 Outer Armors Strength 370 Lbs/Armor
12 Inner Armors Strength 370 Lbs/Armor Real world Conditions
Weak Point < 50% Break Strength – Cable Weight in Mud at Max Depth
Weak Point < (10,400 Lbs X .50) – (17Kft X 130 Lbs/Kft) § Weak Point < 5200 Lbs – 2210 Lbs

=Weak Point < 2,990 Lbs Determine Max Weak Point Value Number Of Armors Used = Max Weak Point / (Armor Strength X .85)Total Number Of Armors = 2,990/(370 x .85)

=Total Number Of Armors = 9 Select Number of Armors Resulting Actual Weak Point (WPACT)
WPACT = 9 X (370 Lbs X .85)§WPACT = 9 X 314.5
WPACT = 2,830 Lbs Actual Weak Point Stuck @ 12,000’ MSP = (WCM (Lbs/Kft) X Depth(Kft) ) + (WP X .66) MSP = ( 130 Lbs/Kft X 12 Kft) + (2,830 Lbs X .66) MSP = 1,560 Lbs + 1,868 Lbs
MSP = 3,428 Lbs Calculating Max Safe Pull
MinPO = (130 Lbs/Kft X 12 Kft) + 2,830 LbsMinPO = 1,560 Lbs + 2,830 Lbs
Min PO = 4,390 Lbs

MaxPO = (130 Lbs/Kft X 12 Kft) + 3,330 LbsMaxPO = 1,560 Lbs + 3,330 Lbs
MaxPO = 4,890 Lbs Where will you pull out?
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