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BUSINESS ENGLISH

HOW TO IMPLEMENT BUSINESS ENGLISH
by

jan kuijt

on 8 January 2014

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Transcript of BUSINESS ENGLISH

One of the fastest growing areas of ESL/EFL and one with a consistently high demand for qualified teachers is Business English (BE). With the rise of the global economy, the development of free market associations and the prevalence of modern international travel, English, as the language of the international business community, is in greater demand than ever by companies and individuals everywhere.
INTRODUCTION
This presentation will lead you step by step through the process of creating and implementing a successful Business English program.
STEP BY STEP
ENGLISH
In the BE environment, it is often useful to think of the classroom as having two teachers: You are the expert in language, and your student is the expert in business.
ASSES TARGETS AND LEARNING NEEDS



Gaps
can be understood as the difference between what the learner is able to do at present and what he wants/needs to be able to do in the future. Ideally, the material taught in the BE course will be directed at filling these gaps.
Interests
(or, as some authors put it, “wants”), are the learner’s motivations that point to the objectives the learner wants to achieve. Sometimes learners’ interests don’t always match their—or their employer’s—target needs.
Needs
can be divided into two categories:
target needs
and
learning needs
. Target needs focus on the linguistic forms and functions pertinent to the situation(s) in which the learner seeks to acquire competence (making presentations or writing emails, for example). Learning needs refer to what the student needs to have or to do in order to learn effectively.
STEP 1
STEP 1: NEEDS, INTERESTS and GAPS
When planning a Business English program, it is important to understand, and take into account, learner needs, interests, and gaps.
GAPS
INTERESTS
NEEDS
NEEDS
ASSESMENT
Course Design
STEP 3
The process of designing a BE course can be visualized as in the diagram below:
STEP 1 = Assess target and learning needs



STEP 2 = Analyze target and learning needs


STEP 3 = Write a syllabus to maximize potential of learning situation in order to achieve learning goals, including tools (e.g., tests) for measuring if the goals are met.


STEP 4 = Reevaluate materials and syllabus
Since BE is often taught in an environment where accountability is the norm, it is particularly important to set and state clear, realistic, and achievable goals and objectives.
SYLLABUS
Clarify the conceptual framework used to
organize the course.
Describe the course format and the types of
activities in the course.
Define the teacher’s and learners' responsibilities
Set a clear statement of realistic and accomplishable
learning goals and outcomes
Explain criteria and procedures for evaluation
Acquaint learners (and the company) with course logistics
Include a list of possible course materials and resources
Provide a course calendar, which will be adhered to and, if necessary, revised
State that the syllabus is flexible and subject to changes derived from continuous assessment.
An effective BE syllabus should accomplish the following basic objectives:
The learners will be able to use:
situation
function
Appropriate
language
forms

Structures &
Phrases

Directors from Parent Company visiting
Introducing themselves and acknowledging introduction
too.
May I introduce
......

It's a pleasure to meet you.

Likewise. Nice to meet you

Small Talk/
Breaking the ice
Simple Present review

Simple Past review & review of irregular verbs

Specifically question formation

Describing role in department and role of department
Materials
Evaluation
In general, you have three choices when deciding upon materials:
Adopt already existing materials;
Write your own materials;
Use a mix of the two, adopting already
existing materials and complementing them
with your own materials according to the
syllabus you have designed.


1 Is the material visually attractive?
Are the illustrations clear?
Lively? Do the illustrations aid in teaching?

2 Are the tasks easy to use?
Are they culturally suitable?

3 Is there any authentic material, such as text from newspapers or magazines, or listening excerpts?

4 Does the material provide opportunities for the students to practice the four language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening)?

5 Does the material provide opportunities to practice the subskills of grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation?

6 Is the material relevant to the learners’ needs?

7 Does the material match the target and learning needs of your group? Consider language learning theory, methodology, level of proficiency, subject-matter content, the variety of activities and interaction dynamics, integrated skills work, development of learning strategies, and the number of hours of instruction.

8 Can your group afford the material?

9 Can the material be easily found?
Answering these questions will aid your evaluation:
Analyze target and learning needs
STEP 2
Target Needs
How do you determine a student’s target needs? A good way to start is to brainstorm
from each of the following categories a variety of questions to ask your students:
Why do you need to communicate in English?
To conduct meetings, negotiate contracts, plan itineraries for visiting clients, etc.
Where will you use the language?
In company, in your own country, abroad, etc.
Who will you communicate with?
People below or above you in the organizational hierarchy, strangers or acquaintances, colleagues from other countries, etc.
Why do you need to study the language?
Personal goals, professional goals, company goals, etc.
Where will you have lessons?
In company, at the school, at home, etc.
What type of learner are you?
Gender, age, nationality, learning styles, etc.
What resources are available?
Books, videos, Internet, confidential company material, opportunities for out of
class activities, etc.
When and for how long will classes be held?
Day, hour, frequency, length of course, etc.
How long and in what capacity have you studied English?
General English in high school, private classes at the company, etc.
Target Needs
How do you determine a student’s target needs?
A good way to start is to brainstorm from each of the following categories a variety of questions to ask your students:
Why do you need to communicate in English?
To conduct meetings, negotiate contracts, plan itineraries for visiting clients, etc.
Where will you use the language?
In company, in your own country, abroad, etc.
Who will you communicate with?
People below or above you in the organizational hierarchy, strangers or acquaintances, colleagues from other countries, etc.
Why do you need to study the language?
Personal goals, professional goals, company goals, etc.
Where will you have lessons?
In company, at the school, at home, etc.
What type of learner are you?
Gender, age, nationality, learning styles, etc.
What resources are available?
Books, videos, Internet, confidential company material, opportunities for out of
class activities, etc.
When and for how long will classes be held?
Day, hour, frequency, length of course, etc.
How long and in what capacity have you studied English?
General English in high school, private classes at the company, etc.
harry sacsioni
DOWN TO BUSINESS
TARGETS
STEP 1 = Assess target and learning needs



STEP 2 = Analyze target and learning needs


STEP 3 = Write a syllabus to maximize potential of learning situation in order to achieve learning goals, including tools (e.g., tests) for measuring if the goals are met.


STEP 4 = Reevaluate materials and syllabus
The process of designing a BE course can be visualized as in the diagram below:
Functional BE courses focus on specific linguistic features, language skills, and communication strategies that learners would find useful in particular business situations. Setting out course objectives for the business student is mostly a matter of common sense and a little preliminary research. You simply need to find out in which situations and for which purposes a businessperson plans to use English. We need to analyse the needs interests, and gaps.
STEP 1
ASSES TARGETS AND LEARNING NEEDS
SAMPLE

I. What are your specific English usage needs
?

usage Never Rarely Sometimes Often Very Often


E-mail
Internet
Meetings
Negotiations
Phone calls
Presentations
Reports/memos
Training
Courses
Manuals
Travel
Othe
r
II. Who do you need to communicate with in English?


Area Never Rarely Sometimes Often Very Often

Headquarters
Other offices
Supervisors
Foreign Colleagues
Clients
External Consultants
Internal Organizations
Others
III. Critical areas for future job demands
Rank the areas critical for improvement for future job demands from 1 (most) to 4 (least)

Area of Improvement Priority of Concern 1 2 3 4

Speaking
Listening
Writing
Reading
Number (or names) of employees working in the following area(s)

Employees number

Management
Sales
Purchasing
Customer relations
Finance
Human resources
Research and Development
Engineering
Maintenance and Repair
Other
NEEDS ASSESMENT
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
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