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Things Fall Apart Summer Project

Tickle the Senses Project
by

Kenna Adams

on 22 August 2013

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Transcript of Things Fall Apart Summer Project

Things Fall Apart

By Makenna Dutter
Part One
"Unoka, the grown-up, was a failure." pg 5

"When Unoka died he had taken no title at all and he was heavily in debt. Any wonder then that his son Okonkwo was ashamed of him? " pg 8
"He had discerned a clear overtone of tragedy in the crier's voice, and even now he could still hear it as it grew dimmer and dimmer in the distance." pg 9
"Umuofia was feared by all its neighbors." pg 11
"But his whole life was dominated by fear, the fear of failure and weakness... It was fear of himself, lest he be found to resemble his father." pg 13
"That year the harvest was sad, like a funeral, and many farmers wept as they dug up the miserable and rotting yams. One man tied a cloth to a tree branch and hanged himself." pg 24
"Even Okonkwo himself became very fond of the boy-inwardly of course. Okonkwo never showed any emotion openly, unless it be the emotion of anger. To show affection was a sign of weakness; the only thing worth demonstrating was strength." pg 2
8
"The drums were beating, persistent and unchanging. Their sound was no longer a separate thing from the living village. It was like the pulsation of its heart." pg 44
"As the man who had cleared his throat drew up and raised his machete, Okonkwo looked away. He heard the blow. The pot fell and broke in the sand. He heard Ikemefuna cry, 'My father, they have killed me!' as he ran towards him. Dazed with fear, Okonkwo drew his machete and cut him down. He was afraid of being thought weak." pg 61
seen as
"Whenever the thought of his father's weakness and failure troubled him he expelled it by thinking about his own strength and success. And so he did now. His mind went to his latest show of manliness.
'I cannot understand why you refused to come with us to kill that boy.' he asked Obierka." pg 66
"How could she know that Ekwefi's bitterness did not flow outwards to others but inwards into her own soul; that she did not blame others for their good fortune but her own evil chi who denied her any?" pg 79
"'Uzowulu's body, I salute you,' he said. Spirits always addressed human's as 'bodies'. Uzowulu bent down and touched the earth with his right hand as a sign of submission." pg 90
"Okonkwo was also feeling tired , and sleepy, for although nobody else knew it, he had not slept at all last night. He had felt very anxious but did not show it." pg 112
Fear
Worry
"The drums and dancing began again and reached fever-heat. Darkness was around the corner, and the burial was near. Guns fired the last salute and the cannon rent the sky. And then from the center of the delirious fury came a cry of agony and shouts of horror. It was as if a spell was broken. All was silent." pg 123
"The birds were silenced in the forests, and the world lay panting under the live, vibrating heat. And then came the clap of thunder. It was an angry, metallic and thirsty clap, unlike the deep and liquid rumbling of the rainy season." pg130
Part Two
"Evil men and all the heathen who in their blindness bowed to wood and stone were thrown into fire that burned like palm-oil. But good men who worshipped the true God lived forever in His Happy Kingdom." pg 145
"A sudden fury rose within him and he felt a strong desire to take up his machete, go to the church and wipe out the entire vile and miscreant gang." pg 152
"But I fear for you young people because you do not understand how strong is the bond of kinship. You do not know what it is to speak with one voice. And what is the result? An abominable religion has settled among you. A man can now leave his father and his brothers. He can curse the gods of his fathers and ancestors, like a hunter's dog goes mad and turns on his master. I fear for you, I fear for the clan." pg 167
Works Cited
Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
Part Three
"How do you think we can fight when out own brothers have turned against us? The white man is very clever. He came quietly and peaceably with his religion. We were amused by his foolishness and allowed him to stay. Now he has won our brothers, and our clan can no longer act like one. He has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart." pg 176
He has

the
"Okonkwo was deeply grieved. And it was not just a personal grief. He mourned for the clan, which he saw breaking up and falling apart, and he mourned for the warlike men of Umuofia, who had so unaccountably become soft like women." pg 183
"That night the Mother of the Spirits walked the length and breadth of the clan, weeping for her murdered son. It was a terrible night. Not even the oldest man in Umuofia had ever heard such a strange and fearful sound, and it was never to be heard again. It seemed as if the very soul of the tribe wept for a great evil that was coming- its own death." pg 187
Foreboding
"It was the time of the full moon. But that night the voice of the children was not heard...Umuofia was like a startled animal with ears erect, sniffing the silent, ominous air and not knowing which way to run." pg 196
"Obierika, who had been gazing steadily at his friend's body, turned suddenly to the District Commissioner and said ferociously: 'That man was one of the greatest men in Umuofia. You drove him to kill himself, and now he will be buried like a dog...' He could not say anymore. His voice trembled and choked his words." pg 208
Full transcript