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Imagery in "The Raven"

Andrew Shin, Matthew Hunderup, & Julia Paraiso
by

Julia Paraiso

on 13 March 2014

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Transcript of Imagery in "The Raven"

- We found that the motif "madness" was a reoccurring theme along with guilt, hatred, and death.

- Madness was found through many examples of imagery.

- The imagery in the poem provided a tone of uncertainty and horror.

Motifs We Found
Another Example
"And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon's that is dreaming, and the lamp-light o'er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor..."

This description of the raven that haunts the narrator expresses the demonic nature of the bird. The narrator shows that he is superstitious about the meaning of the raven saying "nevermore". The use of imagery in this phrase impacted the reader's point of view on the scene heavily because it describes the madness of both the narrator and the bird.
Example of Imagery
"And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain thrilled me - filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before..."

This quote from "The Raven" describes the setting of the poem. Poe uses vivid adjectives to describe the scene of horror and uncertainty. Not only does this imagery describe the setting, but also the narrator. The narrator is "thrilled" by the "fantastic terrors," showing that he enjoys the paranoia of the situation.
by Matthew Hunderup, Andrew Shin, & Julia Paraiso
Imagery in "The Raven"
Full transcript