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Coke VS Pepsi (PC Ver)

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by

Claire Wong

on 1 November 2012

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Transcript of Coke VS Pepsi (PC Ver)

BATTLE
OF THE
BRANDS COKE VS PEPSI 1886: First produced by John Pemberton and sold at a local pharmacy for 5 cents a glass. 1891: John Pemberton sells the company to Asa Griggs Candler for $2300. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. HISTORY Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1893: Pepsi-Cola, Coca-Cola's biggest rival, is created. 1923: Robert Woodruff becomes new company president. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1941: America enters WWII, Woodruff orders that "every man in uniform gets a bottle of Coca-Cola for 5 cents, wherever he is, and whatever is costs the company." Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1945: “Coke” becomes a registered trademark of The CocaCola Company. 1982: Diet Coke is introduced. (became the top low-calorie drink in the world, second in success only to Coca-Cola). 1984: The Coca-Cola Foundation, the company's philanthropic arm is established. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1985: Became the first drink to be consumed in Space. 1993: Coca-Cola Polar Bear Mascot introduced. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 2009: PlantBottle is introduced. (100% recyclable and made from 30% plant-based material). Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 2009: World's largest bottle-to-bottle recycling plant opens, launching "Give it Back", a multi-million dollar marketing effort in support of recycling. Coca-Cola is not just about selling products, but aims to create a significant positive change in the world to makes the world a better place. Mission Statement Business
Strategies Ultimate Objectives of Business Strat.: • To refresh the world
• To inspire moments of optimism and happiness
• To create value and make a difference Guided by


Key Beliefs 1. Customer demand drives everything we do 2. Brand Coca-Cola is the Core of our Business 3. We will serve customers a broad selection of the non-alcoholic ready-to-drink beverages they want to drink throughout the day. 4. We will be the best marketers in the world. 5. We will think and act locally. 6. We will lead as a model corporate citizen To increase volume To expand the share of worldwide non-alcoholic ready-to-drink beverages sales To increase volume To create economic value added by improving economic profit To maximize long-term cash flows. BRANDING COMMON FACTORS IN COKE BRANDING: Continuous improvement in the packaging and brand positioning.
Close alignment of product with the dynamics of consumer sophistication and acceptability of innovation.
Associates brand with mega global celebrations and events.
FIFA WORLD CUP: launched a new version of Somali-Canadian K’Naan’s Waving Flag song. Song went viral through social media, TV commercials and was linked by the common thread of celebration. Association with feeling of togetherness and joy.
Focuses on events such that connect people mainly by the following means: Happiness, Family, Culture, Sports and Music FACEBOOK TWITTER YOUTUBE SOCIAL MEDIA Over on Twitter, Coke’s much more hands on with its followers. It manages the impressive feat of responding to dozens of messages a day. Coke’s clearly staffed for Twitter: I counted eight different reps responding for the brand. (Responses come with the initials of the person writing on behalf of the brand, which is a nice humanizing touch.)
If there’s a quibble, it’s a lack of sharing. This feels like a customer-service outlet at times. There are no links sent and little in the way of personality. Indeed, the link the company gives is to its corporate website, not its popular Facebook page for instance. That’s a miss. Coke’s Facebook page is legendary because it’s the most popular of any brand. The company uses it to promote its community- and family-oriented message.
A lovely graphic of a family of polar bears and a link to the company’s work with the Wild Life Foundation to provide a safe haven for polar bears are the first thing you see. There’s the story of the Coke Facebook page, which was actually begun by fans until the brand brokered a deal to take it over.
Unfortunately, there’s little engagement from Coke with its fans in the here and now. The page is pretty much a means of broadcasting Coke content. YouTube is a slam dunk for Coke, which boasts a ton of video content that’s made for sharing. Landing on Coke’s YouTube page, visitors can watch a minute-long interactive video, which when users click on a Coke bottle, takes them to a different site that corresponds with the image just viewed.
For example, when the ad shows you the inventor of the soft drink, you can click on the in-ad bottle, and it takes you to Doc Pemberton (a.k.a. Creator of Coca-Cola)’s Twitter feed. There are five of these nuggets inside the video leading the viewer to different company sites, like its Facebook page and its mycoke.com site.
Checking out the videos the company posts, we see all sorts of branded videos and some ads. The company knows how to use video to its advantage and YouTube is a perfect house for the company’s foray into sharable video. Coke is thus using YouTube to knit together its social outlets. COCA-COLA'S ADVERTISING Creative
Excellence Advertising, always an important and exciting part of Coca-Cola reflected a brand connected with fun, friends and good times. The international appeal of Coca-Cola was embodied by a 1971 commercial, where a group of young people from all over the world gathered on a hilltop in Italy to sing "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke". MISSION: Vision for the company:
To make Coca-Cola within
"arms reach of desire, across the globe“. 1893: Created and developed as "Brad's Drink" by Caleb Bradham, whose goal was to invent a fountain drink that was delicious, aiding in digestion and as an energy booster. 1933: Coca-Cola Company declined offer to purchase the Pepsi-Cola Company. HISTORY Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1936: Gained popularity after introduction of the 12-ounce bottle sold at five cents, which was the cost of a 6.5-ounce Coca-Cola bottle. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1947: Post World War II. Mack hired Edward F. Boyd to lead a team together with Hennan Smith, both African-Americans, to come up with an advertising campaign portraying African-Americans positively. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 1940s: – Walter Mack, the President of the Company tapped into niche marketing by targeting African Americans, who were previously ignored or portrayed stereotypically. Vision for the company:
To make Coca-Cola within
"arms reach of desire, across the globe“. 1975: "Pepsi Challenge" marketing campaign set up. 1996: Pepsi Stuff, a major loyalty program, was launched, featuring premium apparel - T-shirts, hats, denim and leather jackets, bags and mountain bikes - that could be purchased through the accumulation of Pepsi Points. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 2011: In commemoration of New York Fashion Week, a "skinny" version of the Diet Pepsi can was introduced, described as a sassier version in celebration of beautiful, confident women. 2002: Pepsi Stuff cited as one of the 16 "Ageless Wonders" that redefined promotion marketing. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. Brought vision to the brand.
Used innovative ways to introduce people to the drink.
Made sure people saw the Coca-Cola symbol everywhere by using aggressive promotion. 2009: Sponsorship agreements signed with 3/4 North American sports leagues: National Football League, National Hockey League and Major League Baseball. Led a sales team composed entire of blacks to promote Pepsi.
Racial segregation was still in place, and they faced much discrimination (eg: receiving threats from the Ku Klux Klan). However, racism was also a selling point, and Pepsi attacked Coca-Cola for its reluctance to hire blacks, which raised its market share over that of Coca-Cola for the first time. PEPSICO VISION Our mission is to be the world's premier consumer products company focused on convenient foods and beverages. We seek to produce financial rewards to investors as we provide opportunities for growth and enrichment to our employees, our business partners and the communities in which we operate. And in everything we do, we strive for honesty, fairness and integrity. 1. Care for our customers, our consumers and the world we live in.
2. Sell only products we can be proud of.
3. Speak with truth and candor.
4. Balance short term and long term.
5. Win with diversity and inclusion.
6. Respect others and succeed together. 1 2 3 "PepsiCo's responsibility is to continually improve all aspects of the world in which we operate - environment, social, economic - creating a better tomorrow than today." GUIDING PRINCIPLES:
PepsiCo strives to:- MISSION BRANDING Central theme has always revolved around the youth.
Pepsi has made sure that it stuck to the core theme of being associated with what the youth represents.
The impact of the branding activities has been such that it has been successful in creating a craving of Pepsi ads among the youth. Celebrity endorsements have been the bedrock of Pepsi's advertising. Over the years,
Pepsi has used and continues to use a number of celebrities for general market and targeted advertising, including Wyclef Jean, and Busta Rhymes, who did a targeted campaign for their Mountain Dew product. TWITTER FACEBOOK YOUTUBE SOCIAL MEDIA Pepsi takes you right there where you can see its posts. The brand posts everything from Pepsi images of cans dressed up for Mardi Gras to a short post showing that it gets social: keep calm and sip on (playing off the Keep Calm and Carry On meme).
It appears to post about once a day. The posts are light and energetic, pretty much on Pepsi’s youth brand appeal. Pepsi is using Twitter as a response mechanism but going far beyond that.
Pepsi understands that there is a need to share: whether it’s a link to a Pepsi brand site or a random video of a baby playing ping pong, the people tweeting on behalf of the company understand responding is not just enough to build authenticity. Pepsi nails this.
It uses youthspeak like “woot” and words with repetitive consonants (like thissss) throughout the tweets. The olds might not get it, but the young people are totally into that nowadays. Pepsi’s strong standing on Facebook and Twitter unfortunately doesn’t carry over to YouTube.
It mostly uses its channel to house its TV spots. That’s OK, but when looking at the broader Pepsi social picture, it doesn’t quite fit.
The Pepsi channel currently houses eight commercials for Pepsi, Pepsi Max and Diet Pepsi. It seems as if the company’s YouTube use is an afterthought, which is odd considering how much effort (and budget) the brand puts into TV spots and other video assets. PEPSI CHALLENGE
1975 A Marketing Campaign.
Included blind-tasting between Pepsi and Coca-Cola.
Majority of participants picked Pepsi as the better tasting of the two, and PepsiCo took advantage of the results in advertising. Would lead to the Cola Wars COLA WARS The Coca-Cola company changed its formula in 1985, in response to the "Pepsi Challenge" campaign, which received a lot of backlash for plagiarism.
References to the Cola Wars became evident in pop songs, such as Billy Joel's "We Didn't Start The Fire". WHO IS THE REIGNING CHAMPION? YOU DECIDE LOGO TIMELINE LOGO TIMELINE By: Claire Wong, Elissa Wong & Isabella Wang
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