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What's the difference between summary

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Matthew Montoya

on 14 April 2015

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Transcript of What's the difference between summary

What's the difference between
summary and analysis?

Summary
Shares what the author said
Does not comment on what author said
Does not take apart the author's message and examine specific pieces to see why they are effective/ineffective
In "Letter from Birmingham Jail," King uses logos when he says that there are two types of laws--just and unjust. He defines a just law as one that “squares with the moral law” and an unjust law as one that “is out of harmony with the moral law.”
summary
Adler uses logic to appeal to his readers when he compares the process of owning a book to eating a steak.
summary
Analysis
Takes apart the author's message and examines specific pieces to see why they are effective/ineffective
Comments on what the author said
Explains why each passage of evidence is significant to the overall discussion
summarize: give a brief statement of the main points of something
(Apple Dictionary)
Analyze: 1. examine methodically and in detail the constitution or structure of (something)
2. • discover or reveal (something) through detailed examination
--Apple Dictionary
King uses logos when he says that segregation is not harmonious with moral law because it engenders a harmful sense of inferiority in the oppressed.


In paragraph 16, King supports his position with references to various philosophers and theologians.
summary
summary
In "Letter from Birmingham Jail," King uses logos when he says that there are two types of laws--just and unjust. He defines a just law as one that “squares with the moral law” and an unjust law as one that “is out of harmony with the moral law.”
In "Letter from Birmingham Jail," King uses logos when he says that there are two types of laws--just and unjust. He defines a just law as one that “squares with the moral law” and an unjust law as one that “is out of harmony with the moral law.”
Because King’s audience is a group of ministers which hold a shared belief in a “moral law,” these definitions will likely ring true to them on a logical level.
Analyis
Summary
King uses logos when he says that segregation is not harmonious with moral law because it engenders a harmful sense of inferiority in the oppressed.
King uses logos when he says that segregation is not harmonious with moral law because it engenders a harmful sense of inferiority in the oppressed.
This argument appeals to the ministers’ shared belief in the divinity and worth of the human soul, and causes them to see segregation as a form of oppression. By exposing segregation in this light, King clearly and logically shows how segregation is a violation of justice and moral law.
Summary
Analyis
In paragraph 16, King supports his position with references to various philosophers and theologians.
In paragraph 16, King supports his position with references to various philosophers and theologians
with whom his audience is sure to be familiar. Invoking the authority of these well-respected individuals gives greater weight to King’s words and causes his audience to see how segregation is not simply a social but a moral and a philosophical issue.
Summary
Analysis
Adler uses logic to appeal to his readers when he compares the process of owning a book to eating a steak.
Adler uses logic to appeal to his readers when he compares the process of truly owning a book to eating a steak.
This comparison causes the reader to look at writing in books differently, as not only a physical process but a means of internalizing ideas, and the comparison effectively supports Adler's claim that ownership consists in much more than just having something on the shelf.
Summary
Analysis
To Review:
Summarize:
To say what they said
Analyze:
To examine what they said,
take it apart, and explain why it works/doesn't work
Postman does not acknowledge or attempt to refute the position of his opponents.
Develop your ideas fully.
Postman does not acknowledge or attempt to refute the position of his opponents.
His failure to do so weakens his credibility, since those who are antagonistic to his view will not view his argument as fairly constructed.
Summary vs. Analysis
In your analysis paper, you will have a paragraph-long summary at the beginning which will go over the main points of your article.
In your body paragraphs, you will also need to incorporate summaries of the ideas in your article as you discuss examples of logos, ethos, and pathos.
Therefore, your body paragraphs will need to incorporate
both summary and analysis
to be effective. Just summary alone won't cut it.
To see what I mean, let's look at some definitions and examples.
You will also need to
analyze
the examples you share to show how they are effective or ineffective.
Here the student points out an example of logos, but she does not comment on its effectiveness or tell me how it affects the reader on a logical level. She does not offer any analysis of it. At this point she is merely relating what King says and telling me it's logos.
Again, this example doesn't offer any analysis; it's merely relating what the letter says and telling us that it's logos.
Notice how this example likewise identifies an instance where Adler uses logos, but it does not go beyond merely restating his ideas.
Here's the first passage that we identified as summary. How could we incorporate analysis into the discussion?
Here we have the same passage again, but with some
analysis
added to it (see the bolded section).
Note how in this example, the student clearly explains
how this example of logos appeals to the reader's sense of logic
and
why it's effective.


Here's the second example we looked at--it's still purely summary:
Notice how now we've incorporated analysis into this version.
You may also find things in the article you are analyzing that are not very effective. For example, you might say in your ethos paragraph:
This is a good observation, but in order to qualify as analysis, you need to
develop
this thought a bit more. To
develop
it means to
explain it fully.
Tell me
why
this damages Postman's credibility.
Makes clear WHY the example is ineffective
You need
both
in your paper.
Here the student points out an example of logos, but he is still just telling us what King says--there's no explanation of why these references are effective or how they affect the reader on a logical level. There's no analysis.
Also note that we need both summary
and
analysis to make a clear point.
Here's our third example.
Our last example:
Full transcript