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African American English

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by

Jp Delacruz

on 18 September 2013

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Transcript of African American English

Baby Talk
Creole
Hypothesis
Segregation
Hypothesis
PHONOLOGICAL
SIMPLIFICATION
Phonology of AAE
1. R-Deletion
Non-rhotic (syllable-final /r/
is not pronounced)
ca [ka:], party [pa:ti]
2. L-Deletion
Frequent deletion of final /l/,
particularly after labials.
help [hep], he'll be home [hi bi ho:m]
3. Consonant
Cluster Simplification
Reduction of word-final clusters
test [tes], desk [des], looked [luk]
hardening of the initial /ð/
to either [d] dental stop or
[d] (alveolar stop)
4. Fortition
this [dis], there [dɛ:]
5. Neutralization of [i] and
[ɛ] before Nasals
AAE shares with many regional dialects
the lack of any distinction between /I/ and
/ɛ/ before nasal consonants, producing
identical pronunciations of
pin and pen
bin and Ben
tin and ten
6. /ɔj/ /ɔ/
Another change has reduced the
diphthong /ɔj/ (particularly before
/l/) to the simple vowel [ɔ] without
the glide, so that boil and boy are
pronounced [bɔ].
7. Loss of Interdental
Fricatives
A regular feature is the change
of a /θ/ to /f/ and /ð/ to /v/.
Ruth [ruf]
brother [braVer]
Morphology and Syntax
1. Double Negatives
Multiple negations are common

- He don't know nothing.

- I ain't goin' to give nothing'
to nobody.
2. Existential 'there' is replaced
by 'it'.
It ain't no football pitch a school.
3. Deletion of the Verb "Be"
4. Habitual "Be"
5. Plurals are not marked if
preceded by numerals.
He here for three year now.
6. The genitive is not necessarily
marked with /s/ (as position is
sufficient to indicate this category).
I drove my brother car.
7. "Like to" has often the
meaning of "almost".
She like to fell out the window.
REFERENCES:
- What is happening in English
Sept.2005, Issue 40) English
Teaching Professional
www.etprofessional.com
- An Introduction to Language.
Fromkin, V. & Rodman, R. (Sixth Edition)
AFRICAN AMERICAN ENGLISH
NAME: JHOANNA PAMELA S. DELA CRUZ
SCHOOL: Graceville National High School
EMPLOYEE NO. 654-66-113
PRC NO. 1105229
GSIS NO. 55332-88643-11
ADDRESS: Blk.19 Lt.19, Moses St., FH2
City of San Jose Del Monte
Bulacan
Contact No. 09494648972
Presented by:
African American English
Features:
- youtube links
- audacity
- movie maker
- photoshop
History of AAE
DepED
JHOANNA PAMELA
DELA CRUZ
The Brunei – U.S.
English Language
Enrichment Project
Assessment Program

"September 18, 2013"
Full transcript