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The Son's Veto Presentation

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by

Dr. Why?

on 26 September 2013

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Transcript of The Son's Veto Presentation

The styles of literature used by the author create profiles of the characters and add certain emotions and emphasis to the text. The different styles portray different views of the characters and of the present situation, in varying ways. As the story progresses, the detail and understanding of the text becomes clearer. The way in which the author writes gives the reader the desired perceptive and outlook of the story and of the characters and happenings in it. This in turn, will layout the way people think about the themes and conclude the nature and meaning of the story.

By Group 3: Alfie, Tavian and Yasmin

In the introductory pages of The Son's Veto, we are introduced to Sophy from a distance as if the author doesn't want the audience to know too much about her. Throughout the book she herself uses a smoke screen to cover up any hint of emotion she may possess and the reader is left to conclude what kind of a person she is and what qualities she has.

At first Sophy is presented in a rather obscure and obsolete fashion and it feels as though no one really knows her as well as they think. Most probably know her outer, crippled exterior but most haven't bothered to look deeper into it. "Many of the listeners observed the wheel-chaired lady, curious and intrigued," is an example of how outsiders seem timid to approach her just as the author is to thoroughly explain her. The readers are left to make presumptions on her and her emotions and thoughts. "She was generally believed to be a women with a story," further increases the mystery surrounding her.

Later on in the short tale Sophy can be seen staying in her lounge quietly knitting and it appears as though she is suppressing her emotions. Her feelings are described to be, "penned in her heart," and, "remained stored." Sophy must feel the need to not show her true feelings to the world, a thing which most people can do. Thus, she herself feels dissasosciated with society. This gives off an alienating effect towards Sophy to the reader and was entirely meant to do so by the author.

In the final paragraph none of the character's names are mentioned and this has several effects. It feels as though the people being adressed aren't real people and aren't real men. Randolph wasn't mature enough to let his mother have a god life whereas Sam wasn't man enough to forcefully marry Sophy and undoubtedly form a happy marriage. Both factors to this point contribute to Sophy and it proves everything else in the tale wrong. Sophy does have a purpose, she does contribute to the world and without her it is a different place.

Throughout the book Sophy is seen to be far away from the reader and reality. There is a sense of mystery behind the silence surrounding her, only to be unveiled as great amounts of pain she conceals within herself. It appears as though she has little self-confidence but in the final paragraph it is shown that she does have a purpose and contributes greatly to the lives of others around her. Maybe we coul learn from this and could realise that we also mean a lot to the world and others within it.
In, “The Son’s Veto,” the author uses a very particular writing style in order to convey certain points that may express more than saying it straight up. It feels as though Sophy is trying to excommunicate herself from society with the author’s help, throughout the book Sophy also feels she doesn’t mean anything to the world. The characters feelings are emphasized by certain tricks the author uses such as not naming the characters in certain areas of the book too.

At the beginning of ‘The Sons Veto’ we are introduced to Sophy in a very mysterious and intriguing way. Not formally but on the contrary, from the back. In fact in the first paragraph, her name is not even revealed. It feels as though no one really knows the true Sophy. Most probably know her outer, crippled exterior but most haven't bothered to look deeper into it. "Many of the listeners observed the wheel-chaired lady, curious and intrigued," is an example of how outsiders seem timid to approach her just as the author is to thoroughly explain her. Right through the book, she uses a smoke screen to cover up any hint of emotion she may possess.
"She was generally believed to be a woman with a story," further increases the mystery surrounding her.
How does the style of literature in ‘The Sons Veto’ affect the presentation of its themes?

Later on in the short tale, Sophy can be seen staying in her lounge, quietly knitting and it appears as though she is suppressing her emotions. Her feelings are described to be, "penned in her heart," and, "remained stored." Sophy must feel the need to not show her true feelings to the world, a thing which most people relate to. Thus, she feels disassociated with society. This gives off an alienating effect towards Sophy to the reader and was entirely meant to do so by the author.

The style of writing seen in the first paragraph is revisited in the last, but this time Sam is being described. Sam is represented as “a middle-aged man… but today he wore a neat suit of black”, this shows that he has taken care of his appearance just as Sophy did in the first paragraph of the story with her hair. The author is very clever in going back to this style of writing because the effect it has on the reader is in a way, subtle (although you also feel a sense of familiarity and as if your subconscious recognized the manner in which Sam was portrayed).You would have to re-read or go back and look at the first paragraph to notice the similarity that the two paragraphs have in common. It feels as though the people being addressed aren't real people. Randolph wasn't mature enough to let his mother have a god life, whereas Sam wasn't man enough to forcefully marry Sophy and undoubtedly form a happy marriage. Both factors to this point contribute to Sophy and it proves everything else in the tale wrong. Sophy does have a purpose, she does contribute to the world and without her it is a different place.
Although this may seem like the prominent literature feature in this paragraph, it also states “The man, whose eyes were wet, held his hat in his hand”. This quote explains how Sam still had feelings for Sophy even after such a long time had passed between them. This also represents perfectly his biggest regret, not marrying Sophy. Although Randolf did convince his mum not to, he still feels that he should have done better in winning her love over. By not naming the characters, the readers use the information based on them, to place each role and emotion in the scene.

Over the course of the book, Sophy is seen to be far away from the reader and reality. There is a sense of mystery behind the silence surrounding her, only to be unveiled as great amounts of pain she conceals within herself. It appears as though she has little self-confidence but in the final paragraph, it is shown that she does have a purpose and contributes greatly to the lives of others around her. Maybe we could learn from this and could realise that we also mean a lot to the world and others within it.
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