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Social media has a negative impact on young teens self estee

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by

Katelyn Van Hoozen

on 18 May 2016

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Transcript of Social media has a negative impact on young teens self estee

Social media has a negative impact on young teens self esteem.


When teens get negative comments on their selfies their self esteem is lowered.

“They told me that my body was the wrong shape to be a model and that my skin wasn’t up to scratch. I was mortified,”
“While social media is not the cause of low self-esteem, it has all the right elements to contribute to it,”

Without a lot of likes it’s not good enough.
In today’s social networking, teens are worried about how many “likes” they can get, how many followers they gain and how many retweets they have, even though none of it matters.

Without a lot of “likes,” followers, or retweets, teens see themselves as “not good enough.”
social media set unrealistic beauty standards

· Women wrote more than 5 million negative tweets in 2014.
· Four out of every five negative beauty tweets from women were about themselves.
· Women are 50 percent more likely to say something negative (rather than positive) about themselves on social media.
However, some people say that
The media is not to blame for our body images.

But can we continue to blame the media for every negative thought girls have about themselves? Should we not instead be looking to and encouraging parents, teachers, community leaders, clubs and curriculums to stand in the gap and provide the positive role models that the media has failed to produce?
But......
Yes, parents, teachers, community leaders, clubs and curriculums can teach teens stuff that the media has failed to produce but it won’t stop teens from believing things they read on the internet , or stop them from saying hurtful things to each other.

The media is not to blame for eating disorders.

The way I see it, disordered eating “comes from the outside” whereas eating disorders “come from the inside.”
Media does have an impact on teens and eating disorders, for instance if someone that is not so called "skinny" is scrolling through instagram and comes upon a thin girl in a bathing suit enjoying the beach, they are most likely going to feel like they need to lose weight so they can also look like that.
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