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Creating Successful Community Partnerships: Lewis-Clark State College Faculty

The basics of Service-Learning in higher education for faculty interested in incorporating innovative teaching methods into the classroom.
by Charlette Kremer on 25 October 2011

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Transcript of Creating Successful Community Partnerships: Lewis-Clark State College Faculty

Fertman, C. (1993). Creating successful collaborations between schools and community agencies. Children Today, 22(2), 32.
Creating Successful Community Partnerships
Each module contains references to additional resources to learn more about service-learning theory, best practices, and methodology.
Feel free to click on any of these links as you move through the presentation- the links will open in a new window and you can continue with the presentation at any time.
types of community partnerships,
This presentation is the third in our Service-Learning series, designed to give you a solid foundation in service-learning methods and best practices.
This presentation will guide you through the basics of building Community Partnerships in Service-Learning:
We are glad you are interested in
Service-Learning!
how to develop quality partnerships,
III.
The First Date

how to maintain quality partnership,
V.
Risk & Safety

Advise students to plan for “what if’s”- car trouble, directions, etc.

Advise students regarding appropriate dress: modest, easy-to-move in attire, consistent with agency policy, sturdy shoes, etc.

Clearly define student's role during the service project: advise students not to engage in activities beyond the scope of your class or service project agreement

Advise students to go in pairs if they are visiting people in private homes
Plan Ahead
Home Visits
Injuries
Discuss possible risks for injuries, and how to minimize these risks (proper safety gear, equipment training, etc.).
Discuss liability insurance with your community partner, and verify if the students need to complete agency volunteer forms to be covered under their liability insurance.
Establish a plan for student injuries- who to contact, any forms that need to be completed. General guidelines for students could include:
Vulnerable Populations
Many service-learning projects involve working with vulnerable populations. These populations may require special considerations when planning service projects.
"Risk management refers to a systematic approach to establishing a safe, minimal risk environment for all involved participants involved in service-learning: students, faculty, supervisors, transporters, community agency representatives, and others."
Don't tolerate talk or behavior of a sexual nature. If you feel harassed, tell your supervisor or instructor.
Don't engage in any type of business with clients during the term of your service.
Don't enter into a personal relationship with a client during the term of your service.
Get information about the client, cultural norms, and their situation prior to the home visit.
Try not to be alone with clients without adequate supervision.
Consider meeting at a neutral place (at the agency or at a public building) or going with another student.
Keep your agency informed of your plans and itinerary and check in by phone on a prearranged schedule.
When you arrive, think about where to sit (keep an unobstructed path to the door).
Trust your intuition; if something does not feel right, leave. Talk to your agency supervisor about your concerns and ask to switch clients.
Transportation
How will students get to and from the service site?

Drive carefully; the university is not liable for risks involved in students getting to and from their service sites.

Do not give a client a ride in a personal vehicle

If you would like to take your children with you, make sure you get prior permission from the agency.
Community Partnerships generally fall on the continuum between "transactional" and "transformative" seen below. As you plan your service-learning course, consider what type of partnership you would like to create.
Make a Plan
These vulnerabilities may be subtle but may limit the ability of certain groups to refuse to participate or to continue to participate in the project activities.
Privacy expectations-- what is appropriate for students to discuss or post outside of the agency (e.g. class blogs, Facebook/Twitter, discussions with friends & family, etc)?
Procedures for photographing or filming individuals-- are there any required waiver or consent forms, or policies regarding multimedia?
Background checks-- who will pay? How long will they take to process? Are there alternative projects/assignments available for students who do not pass a background check?
These populations tend to be more likely to be vulnerable to coercion or undue influence to participate in the project activities.
Generally speaking, vulnerable populations include:

Children and youth under age 17
Persons 60 years or older
Individuals with disabilities
Refugees
Additional safeguards may be needed to protect the rights and welfare of these groups. If your project includes a vulnerable population, be sure to ask your community partner for recommendations on how to prepare and what to consider.
"A healthy service-learning curriculum requires strong community partnerships that are committed to both community impact and student learning."
A Continuum of Community Partnerships
Transactional or Transformative?
Key Attributes of
Successful Partnerships
Managing students who fail to fulfill their responsibility to the project (withdraw from class, fail to complete project, or fail to produce quality required)
II.
Making a Match

http://www.childtrends.org/Files/Child_Trends-2008_03_12_PI_CommunityPartner.pdf
Non-profit organizations:

Local and regional businesses

Foresters, farmers, fishermen

Service organizations such as Rotary and Scouts

Local elementary schools or high schools

Government agencies

Health clinics
Building Community Partnerships: Tips for Out-of-School Time Programs
Evaluate Your Needs
Stumped?
Examples of Potential Community Partners
Look for community partners that have...
Stop and Write #2
Consider how your class can address a community need. Brainstorm organizations that might be a good match for your curriculum.

*Refer back to the previous form to complete
Developing the Partnership: Relationship Building
After you have selected one (or several) possible partnership opportunities, make an appointment to visit the community partner on site and discuss the following:
Goals, mission, and needs of the community partner and their clientele
Learning outcomes- What do you want your students to learn from the service? For example:
VI.
Review & References

Review
References
- Outcome, timeline, location, evaluation, etc.
- What is the minimum necessary outcome? What is the ideal outcome?
Don't hesitate to contact the community partner if you have questions.
I.
Laying the Foundation

When considering potential community partners, it is helpful to ask yourself a few questions to get started:
Explore Your Options
Once you have evaluated and determined your needs, learning objectives, and service-learning model, you can begin to investigate possible partnerships.
Each individual is regarded as a partner with a right to know and participate in the decision making process.

Differences are recognized, shared, and used to strengthen the relationship. (Fertman, 1993)
Equality
Candid discussions about risks and mutual benefits of working together help reduce anxiety. (Fertman, 1993)
Trust
Transactional Partnerships
Generally require more set-up, logistics, discussion, etc. than Transformational partnerships.

Designed to complete one task, with no "big picture" or long-term goals.

Commitments are limited and generally project-based.

Often have higher potential for miscommunication.

Students may not be as invested as with Transformative partnerships.
Characteristics of Transactional Partnerships
Transformational Partnerships go beyond a business type relationship (transactional) and become more like co-educator relationships.

Are more open to unanticipated developments.

Require a deeper, more sustained commitment from participants.

Require individuals to reflect on long-term and "big picture" ideas (examine how they do business, how they define and understand problems, etc.)

Involve higher risk, but often demonstrate higher gains as well.
Characteristics of Transformative Partnerships
Transformative Partnerships
Adapted from "Meaningful Service With the Community"
Define the Service
Students (or teams of students) serve a community agency as “consultants” working for a “client”. Students work with community members to understand a particular problem or need.








Example: Public Relations students create a PR campaign for a foodbank.
Problem or Project-Based
Students, faculty, and community members work together to design and implement a research project that addresses a community need. Focus is on community members finding solutions using information from the research.







Example: Psychology students collaborate with a shelter to survey community attitudes towards homelessness for a city-wide awareness campaign.
Community-Based Action Research
Decide what service-learning model best suits your course needs.
IV.
Making It Last

Discuss Project Details
What is working well? What could be improved? Is the project still useful to all partners?

Have there been any changes in population that the students will be working with?

Number of students needed: Too many? Too few?

Timelines-Review important dates, evaluate if the timeline is still appropriate.

Student tasks and job descriptions: Do these need to be clarified/changed?

Training and supervision: Is more needed?

Evaluation strategies: How might you continue to measure the success of the project? The performance of the students?

Any changes in resources needed from each partner.
Cultivating Partnerships: Continuing the Relationship
Once you have established your partnerships, it is helpful to take steps to further develop and improve the relationship
The projects you and your students work on may change over time. Continue discussing the details of any potential changes with your community partner, including:
Build your partnership with big aims in mind and out of a sense of what is possible, not out of a sense of what is lacking.

Never pass up an opportunity to help one of your partners—make them look good.

Play to your partners’ strengths and encourage them to play to yours.

Don’t be afraid of failure—fail often, learn from your mistakes and move on.

Leave your ego at the door.

Treat local partners like permanent neighbors, not visitors from out of town.

Maintain a sense of humor and have fun.

Celebrate and spread the success around. Offer thanks, thanks, thanks.

Be patient.
Secrets for Cultivating Healthy Partnerships
How does the service relate to the subject matter of the course?
How much time can you devote to developing a community partnership?
What must students do to fulfill their commitment to the community partner or service project?
What kind of organization would best fit your curriculum?
Students draw upon the knowledge they have obtained throughout their academic career and combine it with relevant service work in the community.






Example: Engineering students use design and project management skills to create a product for an individual or community partner.
Capstone Service-Learning
Here are a few examples of community partners to get you started:
Establish clear guidelines for personal boundaries, and communicate these clearly to the students. For example:
If students will be going to client homes, establish guidelines for their visits. For example:
Each circle contains "Stop & Write" prompts. Please take a moment to respond to the prompts by clicking on the link located below the first prompt. A new window will open with one form where you will enter all of your answers.
Once you have completed all of the "Stop & Write" activities, click "submit" on the form. Your responses will be reviewed and saved by Service-Learning staff and used as you continue to plan your course.
Students are expected to have a presence in the community throughout the semester and reflect on their experiences on a regular basis, using course content as a basis for their analysis and understanding.






Example: Students in a Child Development class work with children at youth-focused agencies.
Discipline-Based
How can your students support the individuals, organizations, schools, or other entities in the community?
What course learning objective do you want the service-learning experience to help achieve? For example:
Veach, L. (2008). Meaningful service with the community. Proceedings of the faculty development workshop office of leadership and service-learning (pp. 27-42). Greensboro, NC: University of North Carolina Greensboro.
What is a Community Partner?
Agencies and people in the community who directly touch the lives of citizens
Providing service experiences for your students
Non-profit and community organizations want to be good partners and want the experience to be a positive one for students.
Time
Equal Partners
Flexibility
It is a significant role reversal to put yourself in the position of learner, with the community partner as the expert and teacher.
Explore their capacities and abilities, and share these with your students.

As faculty and students shift their perception of community members from deficient and needy to acknowledging that the community members have valuable and desirable strengths and insights, they will be able to realize the real reciprocity integral to the discipline of service-learning.
and how to address issues of risk and safety.
Own success is bound to other’s
Funding & staff intertwined (ie: forming coalition)
Governance of new group does not favor any partner or interest
All partners can articulate self interests and mutual benefits
Scheibel, Bowley, Jones, (2005)
Clear lines of communication
Some co-planning & some evaluation
Some written documents
Partner is viewed as a one of many potential "clients"
No strong personal relationships
Little or no expectation
Communication limited to updating listings
A few people/projects each year
Predictable conversations (a few emails, calls per year)
Agreements and expectations may or may not be written
Co-design of initiatives that meet common concerns; e.g., creating new community programs, services, etc.
Fundraising, marketing, evaluation done jointly
Power and future collaborations discussed and shared openly
Helping students make meaning of their experiences
Offering community-based knowledge and expertise (or "real-world" perspective)
Community Partners play a vital role in the service-learning experience by:
Local groups or organizations (usually a non-profit) with whom you work on a regular basis
The bridge between service and the classroom
Community Partners in service-learning are generally:
Photo by William Warby
Still need help? Service-Learning staff can help to identify potential partners based on the course and community needs. Visit our website:
photo by Scott Feldstein
Stop and Write #3
1. Think about the learning objectives of your course (what are your course needs?)
2. Brainstorm projects that would fit these needs.
3. Write down two or three project details to discuss when you meet your community partner.

*Refer back to the previous form to complete
http://www.promiseofplace.org/assets/files/PBE_Manual_03_Part2.pdf
Building Strong Community Partnerships
Be willing to make visits to the community partner site, to gain a sense of what the students might experience:
Practice
Consistent Communication
Communication
Establish a system of consistent communication to ensure that projects progress as planned and goals are accomplished. (Abravanel, 2003)
Work together in planning projects. (Abravanel, 2003)
Share decision-making groups, develop a communication plan, and identify specific roles, responsibilities, and commitments (Kagan, 1991).
Cooperation
Collaboration
Coordination
Share information that is useful-- new opportunities will often develop as a result. (Abravanel, 2003)
Partnership
Photo by Candie N
Photo courtesy of Corporation for National and Community Service
Students' capacities- What skills & knowledge can they contribute to a project?
Logistics- What is the scope of the project or number of expected service hours? How many students will participate in the project? For example:
Course deadlines- How might these impact the service project?
Classroom visits- Would you like the Community Partner to visit or present to your class?
Clearances needed to conduct the project i.e. agency approvals, consent forms, permits for use of public spaces
Costs entailed in the project, and who is responsible for these costs (e.g. costs included in course fees, paid for by agency, etc.)
Specific tasks to be performed by students (e.g. tutoring, web design, administrative work, etc.)
Parameters for the service project:
Supervision needs- will the students be relatively independent, or work closely with a supervisor?
Training and orientation requirements
Communication- Methods and frequency of feedback between you and your Community Partner
The assets, abilities and capacities of the agency and the clientele
Limited Awareness
Limited Expectations
Structured Involvement
Joint
Project Development
Co-educators
Community partners also have other jobs to do, limited staff, and busy schedules. Respect and value the time they invest in your students.
Investigate the agency history, mission, and related social issues before making contact.
If possible, meet agency representatives at their offices or at a location convenient to each of you (local coffee house, restaurant, etc.)
A Foundation of Respect
As you begin to establish a community partnership, it is important to remember these perspectives on time, equal partnership, and flexibility
Be open to indirect service projects (Service that provides support to community vs. direct contact with people) such as newsletter articles, web design, etc.
The dangers of the "Ivory Tower" are especially true in service-learning. We want to make sure that we approach the community not as a "laboratory", but with an asset-based approach that recognizes and utilizes the knowledge and skills of the community. For these goals to be realized, faculty and community must be equal, collaborative partners. With that in mind:
Invite community partners to be a part of reflections, presentations, and related in-class activities
Develop ground rules as a team. Example: How might you handle an underperforming student?
Avoid academic jargon
Ask your community partner for specific recommendations on safety.

Recommend that students notify someone about their schedule.

How should students handle safety concerns? Who should they speak with regarding safety concerns?

Give students the option to request an alternate service site if they feel uncomfortable or unsafe with their current site.
Communicate
Stop and Write #1
Take care to "do no harm."
Discuss what you have to offer and how it might be of use to the community partner
Learn about the assets of the community partner and the clientele
What do you think will be the biggest road block to forming a quality community partnership? Brainstorm ways you might address this road block.

*Refer back to the previous form to complete
Stop and Write #4
Plan for Safety
Boundaries
As you begin to plan your service projects with your community partner, consider some of these safety questions and tips. They may seem like common sense, but...
Don't give or loan clients money or other personal belongings.
Don't share too much personal information (phone number, address, etc).
discussing these issues ahead of time can help to alleviate many roadblocks and risks along the way. Collaborate with your community partner to make sure students understand both risk and safety.
Community Partners:
Transactional Partnerships:
Generally require more logistics

Designed to complete one task.
Provide service experiences for your students

Help students make meaning of their experiences

Offer community based knowledge and expertise.
Local groups or organizations (usually non-profits) with whom you work on a regular basis.

Agencies and people in the community who directly touch the lives of citizens.
Transformative Partnerships
Are more open to unanticipated developments

Require a more sustained commitment from participants
Continuum of Community Partnerships
Key Attributes of Successful Partnerships
Communication

Cooperation

Collaboration
Making a Match
Discipline-based

Problem/project-based

Capstone

Community-based Action Research
Similar goals and interests

Missions statement supports learning objectives

Real need

Project ideas that fit your course
Partnerships
Foundation of Respect
Time
Equal Partners
Flexibility
Developing the Partnership
Tips for a Healthy Partnership
After you have selected one (or several) possible partnership opportunities, make an appointment to meet to discuss the following:
Discuss Project Details
Continuing the Partnership
Practice Consistent Communication
Additional Reading
As you plan the project, consider the following discussions, and be sure to address this information when orienting students:
- How will this affect the community partner?
- How will this affect the student? (Impact on grade, letters of reference, etc.)
- What steps should be taken to try and resolve the situation?
Community Partner Factors
Course Factors
Plan for Safety
Vulnerable Populations
Communicate
Plan Ahead
Transportation
Boundaries
Home Visits
Injuries
Talk to your community partner(s) for specific recommendations on safety and discuss how and who to talk to about safety concerns.
Advise students regarding appropriate dress, clearly define student's role during the service project, and advise students to go in pairs if visiting people in private homes.
Consider student transportation needs, client transportation needs, and reasonable liability waivers needed for your circumstances.
Establish clear guidelines for personal boundaries and communicate these clearly to your students.
Discuss possible risks for injuries and how to minimize these risks. Discuss liability insurance with your community partner and verify if the students need to complete agency volunteer forms to be covered. Establish a plan for student injuries.
If students will be going to client homes, establish guidelines for their visits.
Additional Reading
These populations tend to be more likely to be vulnerable to coercion or undue influence to participate in the project activities.

If your project includes a vulnerable population, be sure to ask your community partner for recommendations on how to prepare and what to consider.
Generally speaking, vulnerable populations include:
Children and youth under age 17
Persons 60 years or older
Individuals with disabilities
Refugees
Evaluate Your Needs:
Course Factors
Community Partner Factors
Learning outcomes
Students' capacities
Number of students
Scope of project
Course deadlines
Communication needs
Agency visits
Clearances
Costs
Training requirements
Supervision
Parameters for the service project
Goals and Mission
Specific tasks for students
Integrating Service-Learning into Higher Education (pg 281)
Examples: A grant writing class developing a proposal for a local community organization; students serving food at a homeless shelter once.
Where do you see yourself, your project, or your course on the "Transactional to Transformational" continuum? Why?

(click link below to access form)
http://bit.ly/nlm0n6
Remember that community partners do not work on a semester clock.
National Service-Learning Clearinghouse
Goals,
Results,
Timelines,
Be open to a variety of service projects

Put yourself in the position of the learner

Learn about the assets and clientele of the community partner
Respect and value time invested by community partners

Investigate agency history, mission, and social issues

Meet at partner's office whenever possible
Develop ground rules as a team

Invite partners to participate in classroom activities

Avoid academic jargon
Establish check-in times throughout semester
Ask for feedback
Invite your community partner to be involved in class activities
Visit community partner site
A few people/projects each year
Predictable conversations (a few emails, calls per year)
Agreements and expectations may or may not be written
Scheibel, Bowley, Jones, (2005)
Joint Project Development
Transactional Placements
Partner is viewed as a "listing"
No strong personal relationships
Little or no expectation (of what?)
Communication limited to updating listings
Own success is bound to other’s
Funding & staff intertwined (ie: forming coalition)
Governance of new group does not favor any partner or interest
All partners can articulate self interests and mutual benefits
Limited Activities & Expectations
Transformative Partnerships
Co-Education
Structured Involvement
Limited Awareness
Joint Project Development
Invite your community partner to be involved with classroom activities (Reflections, presentations, etc).
Ask for your community partners' feedback on the service-learners’ performance.
Establish check-in times throughout the semester to discuss student progress and evaluate the success of the project.
Clark, D. National Park Service Conservation Study Institute, The Center for Place-based Learning and Community Engagement. (2008). Learning to make choices for the future: connecting public lands, schools, and communities through place-based learning and civic engagement. National Park Services.
Scheibel, J., Bowley, E. M., & Jones, S. (2005). The promise of partnerships: Tapping into the college as a community asset. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Adapted from Heffernan, K. (2001). ________________________________________________ __________. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course
construction
Connecting with agencies.
Adapted from Boise State University Service-Learning. _____________________ Retrieved from http://servicelearning.boisestate.edu/faculty/connect.asp
Boise State University Service-Learning. Connecting with agencies. Retrieved from http://servicelearning.boisestate.edu/faculty/connect.asp
Learning to make choices for the future:
place-based learning and civic engagement
Adapted from Clark, D. National Park Service Conservation Study Institute, The Center for Place-based Learning and Community Engagement. (2008). ________________________________ ________________________________________________ ___________________________________. National Park Services.
connecting public lands, schools, and communities through
Additional Reading:
The Engaged Community: Maximizing Community Impact
http://bit.ly/kJVTIj
Stop and Write #5
What are some of the risks that might be associated with your service project idea? How might you work with your community partner to address these risks?

*Refer back to the previous form to complete
Additional Reading:
http://bit.ly/mIdBh0
Risk Management and Liability in Higher Education Service-Learning
Heffernan, K. (2001). Implementation in fundamentals of service learning course construction. Providence, RI: Campus Compact.
Fertman, C. (1993). Creating successful collaborations between schools and community agencies. ____________, 22(2), 32.
Children Today
Abravanel, S.A. (2003) _______________________________ _____________________________________ Retrieved from Education Commission of the States website: http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/44/03/4403.pdf
Building Community Through Service-
Learning: The Role of the Community Partner.
Adapted from Boise State Unviersity Service-Learning "Connecting with Agencies"
Abravanel, S.A. (2003) Building Community Through Service- Learning: The Role of the Community Partner. Retrieved from Education Commission of the States http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/44/03/4403.pdf
Contact your agency supervisor and your instructor to discuss what actions the agency and school should take to insure your physical and emotional well-being. Fill out an incident report form within 48 hours.
Stay calm. Your instructor, the agency, and the SL staff will help you.
Service-Learning and community partnerships involve many factors, and no two projects or partners are exactly alike. Successful partnerships allow for individuality and flexibility.
Veach, Leslie "Meaningful Service With the Community". Service-Learning: An Engaged Scholarship. University of North Carolina Greensboro. May 20, 2008. Lecture.
Example: Students act as tutors for a school that has a high drop-out rate
- Attend on-site orientations with your students
- Consider participating in the service alongside your students
Questions?
Contact the Service-Learning office for assistance- staff may have liability forms or agreement templates you can use.
The following are important factors to discuss with community partners who work with vulnerable populations:
"Learning Objectives"
(2 minutes)
Syllabus- Bring a copy to the meeting to help your Community Partner become familiar with your course
"Example of Service-Learning"
(1 minute)
This ends "Reflection: Theory & Practical Application"

Please take 2 minutes to complete a brief survey on this presentation by clicking the link below:
http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/lcscsrvtrainings
If you have more questions, contact:
Charlotte Kremer, Director of Service-Learning
208-792-2084
cpkremer@lcsc.edu
"Learning Objectives"
(1 minute)
Additional Reading:
Unique Nature and Struggles of Traditional Small Nonprofits
http://bit.ly/k7t4BE
What is a Community Partner?
Community Partner Roles:
Learning objectives

Time commitment

Type of organization
Define Your Service:
Explore Your Options- Look for community partners that have:
Equality

Trust

Coordination
Commitments are generally project-based

Have higher potential for miscommunication
Requires individuals to reflect on long term ideas

Involve higher risk but often demonstrates higher gains
Training,
Evaluation,
Resources, etc.
Build from what is possible, not what is lacking
Make partners look good
Play to one another's strengths
Don't be afraid to fail
Leave your ego at the door
Treat partners like neighbors
Have fun
Celebrate and offer thanks
Be patient
Projects and partnerships change over time, so continue to discuss:
Kagan, S. (1991) United we stand: Collaboration for child care and early education services. New York: Teachers College Press.
Kagan, S. (1991) United we stand: Collaboration for child care and early education services. New York: Teachers College Press.
http://www.lcsc.edu/servicelearning
Adapted from CSU Service-Learning Faculty Manual, Fourth Edition; courtesy, The Institute for Learning and Teaching at Colorado State University.
Hurd, C. (2007). The CSU service-learning program's guiding principles. The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Retrieved from http://tilt.colostate.edu/guides/tilt_servicelearning/index.cfm
Hurd, C. (2007). The CSU service-learning program's guiding principles. The Institute for Learning and Teaching, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO. Retrieved from http://tilt.colostate.edu/guides/tilt_servicelearning/index.cfm
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