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SS 20 Chapter 5 Part D

Definition of domestic and foreign policy
by

Dawn Kissel

on 22 February 2011

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Transcript of SS 20 Chapter 5 Part D

What is a policy? Domestic policy Foreign policy A policy is a plan of action that has been deliberately chosen to guide or influence future decisions. Policies you should be aware of include cell phone or hat policies. Domestic policy guides decisions about what to do within the country. What could be some examples of domestic policy for a nation? Changing federal laws, spending tax money, Aboriginal land claims Foreign policy guides decisions about official relations with other countries. Also known as external relations or foreign affairs. In small groups, discuss a few foreign groups that countries may involve themselves with. International organizations like the UN, signing treaties, establishing trade relations with foreign states, and taking action on human rights, world health, and environmental issues. Some foreign policy decisions made at the end of WWI are still affecting the world today. Many people believe that the turmoil in Middle Eastern countries relates directly to the foreign policy decisions of the US and European countries as they pursued thier national interests at the end of WWI. Think about Canada's policy of pursuing its claim to the Northwest Passage. In a partner group create a similar diagram but replace "foreign policy" with "claiming Northweat Passage". In the other bubbles, replace the general connection with specific connections related to the Northwest Passage.
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