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IROQUIOS

By: Tylan Greiner Grade 6 Feb '10
by

Kellie Greiner

on 10 March 2010

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Transcript of IROQUIOS

The Roles Of Women In The Iroquios Society The Importance Of Wampam Belts In The Iroquios Society The Structure Of The Iroquios Society Consensus And It's Vote In The Iroquios sociaty Wampam belts were made with white and purple beads used to make designs such as the Iroqios symbol. Wampam belts were given as gifts at all major occasions and were regarded as a valuble commodity. Wampam belts were brodened into money in exchange and trade. The Iroquios society had 5 nations and 9 clans all binded together by the great law of peace. The names of the 5 nations are: Mohawk (Keepers of the Eastern Door and one of the older brothers), Seneca (Keepers of the Western Door and the other older brother), Onondaga (Keepers of the Council Fire), Cayuga (one of the younger brothers) and Oneida (the other younger brothers). The Iroquios Society was governed by 50 chiefs, some from every nation, who met in Onondaga to discuss issues, although one chief had a principal place of honor. Ir qui s report by... Sonica Cayuga Onondaga Oneida Mohawk Ty G. Bibliography Dickason, Olive and McNab, David (2009). Canada's First Nations. Canada: Oxford University Press.

McMillan, Alan (1995). Native People and Cultures of Canada. Vancover, BC: Douglas & McIntyre Ltd.

Gerrits, Darrel (2008). Taking Part in Our Democracy. Toronto, Ontario: Nelson Education Ltd.

Native American Encyclopedia. (2000). New York, New York: Oxford University Press.

"Flags of Native Americans." _______________________" 2008 TME Co., Inc. 26, Feb. 2010 www. tmealf.com/native_american/n-a.htm


Giese, Paula "Wampum--Native American Beadwork" __________________________ 17, Dec. 1996 www.kstorm.net/isk/beads/wampum.html Symbol Of The Iroquios Confederacy Women had very important roles in the Iroquois society. Women were in charge of farming with both labor and planning as part of their responsibilities. In their society, the women had great influence and had the power to choose the chief that represented their tribe. The women had an important role regarding the council. They were in charge of choosing and replacing chiefs. There were two reasons why a chief would be replaced; for not fulfilling their responsibility of putting the peoples' needs first or a death. The chiefs were then chosen, within the boundaries and rules, by the women. The only way a woman could sit on the council was when they acted as a stand in or regent. Decisions at all levels, in the Iroquios society, were reached by consensus. A consensus is defined as an agreement by everyone involved in a decision, achieved through a process of discussion, in which everybody has a voice and works for the good of the whole group. Most of the discussions and votes for consensus happened in the longhouses. In a consesus vote, the decision is unanimous, which means everyone agrees. The society used a complex system of checking and balancing the votes to ensure fairness, equality and consensus. Largest Stock of Native Flags. Wampum--Treaties, Scared Records.
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