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John Donne

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by

Sarah Kwak

on 2 October 2014

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Transcript of John Donne

(1572-1631)
The Flea

by John Donne

Mark but this flea, and mark in this,
How little that which thou deny'st me is;
It sucked me first, and now sucks thee,
And in this flea our two bloods mingled be;
Thou know’st that this cannot be said
A sin, nor shame, nor loss of maidenhead;
Yet this enjoys before it woo,
And pampered swells with one blood made of two,
And this, alas, is more than we would do.

Oh stay, three lives in one flea spare,
Where we almost, yea more than married are.
This flea is you and I, and this
Our marriage bed and marriage temple is;
Though parents grudge, and you, we are met,
And cloistered in these living walls of jet.
Though use make you apt to kill me,
Let not to that, self-murder added be,
And sacrilege, three sins in killing three.

Cruel and sudden, hast thou since
Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence?
Wherein could this flea guilty be,
Except in that drop which it sucked from thee?
Yet thou triumph’st, and say'st that thou
Find’st not thyself, nor me the weaker now;
’Tis true. Then learn how false, fears be:
Just so much honor, when thou yield’st to me,
Will waste, as this flea’s death took life from thee.
Ginyu force
Poems of John Donne
Sources
http://education-portal.com/academy/lesson/metaphysical-poetry-definition-characteristics-examples.html#lesson
http://www.shmoop.com/the-flea/summary.html
John Donne
Metaphysical Poetry
Characteristics:
A group of English lyric poets in the 17th century
Intellectualized
Strange imagery
Frequent paradox and puns
Contain extremely complicated thoughts
Contain large doses of wit
Weird comparisons = Conceits (a fanciful expressions in writing or speech; elaborate metaphor)
i.e. comparing
lovers
to
a compass
and
old man
/
soul
to
a drop of dew

17th Century, Anti-Catholic Era, born from Catholic Family
Topics: Love, Religious, Erotic, Death
Considered to be the founder of metaphysical poetry and master of the metaphysical conceit.
your
you
you
you
yourself
ready
to isolate
have
you
you
you
you
you
Full transcript