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Final Alsip Version Facilitation Training 101 v.18.11.13

Official version incorporating all slides
by

alexandre dachs

on 23 January 2014

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Transcript of Final Alsip Version Facilitation Training 101 v.18.11.13

“I wouldn’t do that if
I were you,
it’s ridiculous”*
Facilitation Training
Open Forum Discussion

 
« Handling Difficult Situations »
Alarm - Hijack!
discussing this?
Do you want to keep
your point
We’ve listened to
you’d…
I can see why
has said…
on what John
Let me build

Respect your audience

Be fair

Get tough

Ask your audience
There are Questions and Questions...

Useful question
Check that you’ve answered in full
Less useful question
“If you need more on that, we’ll talk later…”
Unhelpful question
Avoid eye contact and move on
Handling Questions

Make it clear when participants can ask questions
Repeat or rephrase the question
Open up the question to the group
Work the room
Control the timing
Exercise - Multicultural Groups and Language Issues
 Time Allowed = 10 min. + 5 min. (for group feedback)


Prepare a presentation for your feedback

Let’s do a small team exercise:
- What should a facilitator be paying special attention to?
 Think different cultures and origins
 Think different languages
 Think different genders
Handling difficult situations

When things go wrong...
- don’t rehash, don’t blame

- remain calm
- keep your sense of humour


Handling participants’ complaints
- see who can help you deal with the issue

- remain neutral
- ask for a solution – if OK, apply
Exercise – Chunking up and down

We chunk down to get details and distinctions. We also chunk down to maintain agreement for action.



What are examples of this?
What specifically?
What prevents me from achieving this outcome?
Hierarchy of ideas - Chunk Down

We chunk up to get agreement. We also chunk up to separate intention from behaviour.



What is this an example of?
For what purpose?
What is your intention?
If I got this outcome, what would that get for me?
Hierarchy of ideas - Chunking Up
Agreement
Specific
Conflict
Hierarchy of Ideas describes how to master the art of communication by controlling the flow of conversation or ideas from abstract to specific, and vice versa.
Handling Conflicts – Hierarchy of ideas
Some tricks that might help
- Yes-anding
« Yes, and …… » (park the issue)
- Cutting off:
« We have time for one more idea –
what did you want to say again, Yves ? »

Reasons to intervene:

wandering off track;

conflicts;

non-participating or angry participant;

autocratic behaviour
August 12
Determine Whether and When to Intervene
If you recognize habitual difficult behaviour, keep three things in mind:

Behaviour that is rewarded gets repeated.

Address the difficult behaviour.

Change the team dynamics.
Difficult behaviour
The Prisoner
So what do you do?
- try and draw him/her into the learning
- avoid spending an excessive amount of time
(should he/she become too disruptive)

He/she is there because
he/she has to be
His/her first approach will
be to challenge
The second approach may
be complete indifference and
abandonment
The Vacationer

Make time to draw him/her
into the group discussion

Use small group activities
Handling difficult participants
Some characters that are easy to recognise

- The Learner

- The Vacationer

- The Prisoner
Handling Groups and Individuals
The Theorist

As a participant
Likes structure (e.g. models)
Likes theories
Enjoys intellectual challenge
Wants to see rationale and logic
Clear purpose
Hates chaos and confusion

What the facilitator needs to do

Be organized
Have a carefully-constructed training program
Show clear objectives and purpose
Use lots of models and theories
The Reflector

As a participant
Likes to have time to assimilate and absorb
Research and investigate
Careful analysis
Observe and evaluate
Dislikes being in an observed role play/action without planning

What the facilitator needs to do

Use video to illustrate
Include analysis of case studies
Use research and report back with groups
Have lots of review and download time
Participants ask questions to each other?

The participants are sitting at the same table
Move closer to the table where the participants are sitting and open the discussion to the whole group

The participants are discussing across the room, excluding everybody else
Observe the audience and if the audience body language indicates it’s OK, let it go on, but make sure to intervene when necessary
Handling Questions – Be careful...
* Unnecessarily patronising,
political, unsincere ...
“Its funny that you
should say that”*

Watch your body language
Don’t comment on quality of question
Don’t get side-tracked
Don’t say…

We lateral chunk to access other examples.




What are other examples of this?
Hierarchy of ideas - Lateral Chunking

Four types of ‘active’ Interventions include -

Causing the group to examine its dynamics and improve its performance

Encouraging member participation

Encouraging problem solving and decision making

Ensuring compliance with procedures, policies, ground rules, requirements that define the process within the organisation
August 12
How to Intervene
The Learner

Try to identify him/her early

Encourage his/her participation

Keep the energy flowing
Action 1:
Notes
xxx
abc
Matrix Partners preso!
Harvard Business Review
How to lower the cost of enterprise sales?
xxx
r
w
m
The Cost to Acquire a Customer (CAC) exceeds the Life Time Value (LTV) a customer brings us.
This is my third go-around selling to large enterprises, SkyStream, Kontiki and now Qumu.

I like to explain to you the problem the way I see it, the changes I suggest to avoid making the same mistake again. and
Travels to Clients
Research from Slides
See the trend?
Exercice - Assessing Your Preferential Sense
Individual Exercise

« Assessing Your Preferential Sense »

 Time Allowed = 10 min.



Answer the 15 questions to assess your dominant mode
Engage the Senses
Most people gather information using one of these major senses:









Present materials and information in a way that appeals to the preferred sense of the participants
The Left Half
Mathematical
Science
Analytical
Linguistic
Sequential
The Right Half
Creative
Imagination
Spatial
Emotion
Music
The more links there are, the better we think holistically
Linking the two parts:
the Corpus Callosum
The two halves of the brain
Creating an enjoyable and stimulating environment improves results
A supportive group can do wonders
Get the most from our brains
Here’s a thought…
After three days, we remember:

20% of what we read
30% of what we hear
40% of what we see
50% of what we say
90% of what we hear + see + say + do
So engage many senses
How the (adult) Brain works
Adults seldom use more than 1% of their brain capacity for thinking creatively or their memory
Only when in a physically-relaxed state and when emotions are in balance, will the brain engage fully
Our brain engages best when we
« see, hear, say, and do »
How the adult process information
August 12
Review and download time
Opening the meeting
Preparing the meeting
August 12
Roles and Skills
The facilitator
Kinaesthetic
physical interaction, taste, smell…
what is felt
Auditory
words, songs, music…
what is heard and said
The Three Key Senses
Visual
pictures, writing, body language…
what is seen
The Activist
As a participant
Likes to be active
Competitive
Loves games, role plays, group discussions
Likes attention
Easily bored, hates lectures and monologues

What the facilitator needs to do
Use lots of exercises and energetic tasks
Not too much detailed theory
Active participation required
Not too much time for reflection
The Cost to Acquire a Customer (CAC) exceeds the Life Time Value (LTV) a customer brings us.
This is my third go-around selling to large enterprises, SkyStream, Kontiki and now Qumu.

I like to explain to you the problem the way I see it, the changes I suggest to avoid making the same mistake again. and
Travels to Clients
Research from Slides
Action 2:
Action 3:
How we process information
Introduction
Section 1
Setting the scene

Section 2
Team and participants' behaviors

Section 3
Building confidence and handling groups

Facilitating a meeting
How to run more successful meetings

Refocus the meeting participants by:


Causing the group to examine its dynamics and improve its performance

Encouraging member participation

Encouraging problem solving and decision making

Discourage personal attacks

Ensuring compliance with procedures & policies that define the process within the organization and the ground rules!
How to intervene
If you recognize habitual difficult behavior, keep three things in mind:

Do not dismiss or ignore the difficult behavior to avoid conflict
It will continue
You will lose trust of other participants

Address the difficult behavior
Reaffirm agenda/meeting goals
Chat with person at a break

Change the team dynamics
Break up into groups or change groups
Have a break

Difficult behavior
How to handle them:
Try and draw them into the learning

Avoid spending an excessive amount of time should they become too disruptive
How to spot them:
They’re there because they have to be, not because they want to be

Their first approach will be to challenge

Their second approach may be complete indifference and abandonment
The Prisoner
How to spot them:
Arrive early
Enthusiastic nature
Asking lots of questions
How to handle them:
Try to identify them early
Encourage their participation, they keep the energy flowing

…But don’t let them dominate the meeting!

“Yes, and”-
ing
:

“Yes, and…” (park the issue)

Cutting off:
“We’ve got time for one more idea – what did you want to say again, Fred?”
The Learner
Some easily recognizable characters:

The Learner

The Vacationer

The Prisoner
Handling difficult participants
It's 3:30pm on a Friday afternoon. A meeting of the Board of a manufacturing company is called to discuss a proposal to donate $20,000 to a local school.

The board consists of:
Facilitator
Finance manager
Engineering manager
Production manager
HR manager
Sales manager
Logistics manager

In the interest of time the meeting should be kept as short as possible. The facilitator, in any case, has another meeting starting at 4:00pm.
The meeting must decide whether the donation should be made or not.

Time allowed: 20 minutes
Exercise
Handling individuals

Conflict of behaviors
Guided discussion:
Enable facilitators to ask the group a series of planned questions designed for a purpose


Humor:
Can improve, maintain, and enhance participant interest

But…an item or anecdote must be relevant to the session topic

Avoid controversial topics and even mild cursing, stay clean etc…

Quotations:
Before you use a quote be sure of its authenticity
Tactics to assist the meeting
Use the correct facilitation technique
Group problem solving techniques
Define the problem, identify root causes, generate alternative solutions, evaluate the solutions, agree and Develop action plan

Resolving conflict
Conflict should not be suppressed - deal with the problem.
Extinguish personal attacks.

Leading, questioning
A facilitator should be skilled in asking good questions:
Open ended – “Why did you choose that answer?”
Close ended – “Are you awake?”
Hypothetical – “What if”
Rhetorical
Handling questions – be careful!
Positive participant behavior

Arrives early
Asks questions
Helps to keep the group on the topic
Volunteers for projects and tasks
Keeps eye contact
Spontaneously gives examples
Body language indicates he/she is listening
Review and download time

Reflect on what you learned during this session

Capture the 3 most important ideas to you

As a result, identify what actions you will take
Be aware of your own style

If you have a dominant style in a particular area:

You will tend to lead with that style

Be self-aware and counter it to provide a balanced approach
Don’t focus on your dominant style!

Pre work - "Different participant styles - 1"
‘Radar’ chart
The Pragmatist
As a participant
Looking for practical applications
“How to” tools and techniques
Opportunities to try things out
Role simulations and models
Sense of reality
Wants “expert” advice

What the facilitator needs to do

Include practical activities with coaching and feedback
Link to work situations
Include “How to” models
Give lots of “Tips and Tricks”
Linear Participants
specific order
logical flow
Different Types of Participants
Become familiar with the four behavioral styles

Learn facilitator strategies

Review and discuss your own personal style (from your pre-work)
What we will cover



Discuss practical ideas of how to engage the senses in a meeting




Time allowed: 5 minutes
The Left Half
Mathematical
Scientific
Analytical
Linguistic
Sequential
The Right Half
Creative
Imaginative
Spatial
Emotional
Musical
The more links there are, the better we can think holistically
Linking the two parts:
the Corpus Callosum
The two halves of the brain
We'll consider four generations and what motivates them:

Silent Generation (c.1930s)

– Dedicated, hard-working and loyal
Like:
Respect for authority, cautious.
Dislike:
Waste & technology

Baby Boomers (c.1950s)

– Optimistic and driven
Like:
Hierarchy, can-do attitude.
Dislike:
Laziness

Generation X (c.1970s)

– Independent and skeptical
Like:
Freedom, multi-tasking, work-life balance.
Dislike:
Red tape

Generation Y (c.1990s)

– Hopeful and determined
Like:
Latest technology.
Dislike:
Anything slow and negativity
Consider the generational mix of the group
Creating a
relaxing, enjoyable and stimulating
environment improves results
…and a
supportive
group can do wonders
Creating the ideal environment
How the brain works
Adults seldom use more than 1% of their brain capacity for thinking creatively

Our brains work best when in a physically relaxed state with our emotions in balance
Why we think differently

How to best engage participants during meetings
What we will cover
Group 1:
You are a member of a space crew originally scheduled to rendezvous with a mother ship on the lighted surface of the moon. Due to mechanical difficulties, however, your ship was forced to land at a spot 200 miles from the rendezvous point. During re-entry and landing, much of the equipment aboard was damaged, and, since survival depends on reaching the mother ship, the most critical items available must be chosen for the 200 miles trip.

You will receive a list of 15 items left intact and undamaged after landing. Your task is to rank order them in terms of their importance for your crew in allowing them to reach the rendezvous point.

Place the number 1 by the most important item, then number 2 by the second most important, and so on through to number 15, the least important.


Group 2:
Observers


Time allowed: 30 minutes
Exercise
Characteristics of this phase:

Team fully productive and effective
Demands a high level of trust
Members recognized for and use unique talents
But… watch out for ‘group think’ – no challenges to decision making – riskier decisions

Performing
Facilitators can help by:

Guiding the group through effective processes to achieve desired outcomes
Avoiding the temptation to intervene unnecessarily
Characteristics of this phase:

Cohesive group with co-operation and understanding
Established roles
Differences resolved
Developed written / unwritten rules or norms
Agreed decision making processes
Group ready to tackle task
Norming
Facilitators can help by:

Observing the emerging norms
Encouraging value of expressing differences positively
Working towards and holding group cohesiveness
Facilitating negotiation
Characteristics of this phase:

Questioning – ‘Who is responsible for what?’; ‘What are the rules?’
Boundaries are tested
Power struggles
Cliques
Silent members / dominant members
‘Hidden agendas’ that need talking out
Storming
Facilitators can help by:

Promoting good conflict resolution processes
Separate problems from individuals
Not taking storming issues personally
Enforcing ground rules and role as process expert
Characteristics of this phase:

Politely share information
Personal opinions are avoided
Similarities are explored
Group orientation is towards assigned tasks
Forming
Facilitators can help by:

Using icebreakers
Issuing an agenda and desired outcomes
Listening to expectations
Establishing ground-rules
Agreeing how decisions will be made
Teams / groups have tremendous energy when first formed

New groups are excited, motivated, eager to tackle tasks

There are identifiable phases, characteristics and group and individual needs during the life of the group

Effective facilitators know how to identify each phase and guide the group through to maximize effectiveness
Introduction
A team can:

usually achieve things that individuals cannot

use the knowledge and skills of all its member to arrive at the best solution

In a team, the members will have been involved in each of the decisions taken. This means they will be more committed to those decisions and more likely to make them work.
Benefits of teamwork
Stages of team development
How teams work together
An effectively facilitated meeting is executed with a purpose:

Discussions should revolve around the meeting’s goal(s)
If not, then parking lot!

What outcome would indicate the group’s achieved the meeting’s objective?

An agreed decision
Recommendations
List of ideas
Communicate meeting goals and objectives
Multicultural groups and language issues
Consider different:

Cultures and origins

Languages

Gender
Capture points that are off-topic, but not to be forgotten












Sometimes referred to as an ideas or questions “Parking Lot”
Creating a “Question Park”
Introduce the
Team Members

Not only by their names, but find common interests
...
to build a team
!

Encourage people to interact
Developing a strong opening
How to
start
your meeting
well

…and considerations to
maintaining it
What we will cover
Establishing ground rules, using ice breakers, and identifying other roles
Some final, important points to consider:

Joining instructions
Where the meeting will be held and consider issuing contact details
Conference call details

Booking the room
Make sure it’s appropriately sized and suitably comfortable

Catering
Consider dietary requirements of the participants

Consider need for pre-work

Collating notes prior to the meeting
As the facilitator,
you need to be prepared
Communications and logistics
The physical environment can have a major impact on the success of any meeting
Check your toolbox for:

Room set up options

Room preparation check list
Create an effective climate
Group dynamic increases in complexity with each member added!

As a guideline,
teams of 5 to 8 are the most effective

Group dynamics
Sit down with the problem owner:

Spend time upfront gathering background information

Review objectives and needs

Think:
S
pecific
M
easurable
A
chievable
R
ealistic
T
ime-bound

And identify who should participate
Understanding needs
The project meeting facilitator
Causes of meeting ineffectiveness
Understanding needs and objectives, and creating the agenda
Required skills for facilitation
Some typical answers:

Active listening
Questioning
Sharing
Group problem solving techniques
Resolving conflict
Use styles to encourage participation
Accepting of others
Empathizing
Leading
In two groups:

Identify the skills that make a good facilitator

Use the
Problem Reversal Technique






Time allowed: 10 minutes
Feedback: 5 minutes
Skilled facilitators strive for excellence in
three
main areas


Managing

the facilitation process

Acting as a
resource

Remaining
neutral
Role of a facilitator
Introduce the
role
of a facilitator

Discuss the
skills
needed to be successful
What we will cover
Reasons to intervene:

Discussion wanders off-track

Disruptive conflicts

Non-participating or angry participant

Autocratic/dictatorial-like behavior
Determine whether and when to intervene
How to handle them:
Try to draw them into the group discussion
Use small group activities
How to spot them:
They’re not interested in the subject
They’re there for the coffee and food
The Vacationer
Listening, empathizing
Active participation of attendees requires listening to what they say.
When someone responds, avoid assuming you know what will be said
Interrupting and jumping to hasty conclusions will dampen the discussion

Accepting different opinions and views, accepting of others
Be prepared for views that differ from yours
If you don’t agree with something, remain neutral, encourage further discussion to clarify points if necessary

Silence, use styles to encourage participation
Silence is an effective technique that novice facilitators often struggle with the most
Use the correct facilitation technique
Reinforce positive behaviors
Reinforce verbally, show appreciation by nodding, etc.

Stay with participant during his/her comments

Repeat participant’s statement

Add clarifying information in a rewarding manner

Ask participant to take a lead/proactive role
Engage the senses
Most people gather information during a meeting by using one of these major senses:








Present materials and information in a way that
appeals to the preferred sense of the participants
Are you right- or left-brain orientated?
Brain test: The spinning dancer
Characteristics of this phase:

Team is disbanding
A team/group which is not disbanding may return to stage 1 a new objective and tasks emerge.

Adjourning
Facilitators can help this phase by:

Recognizing and rewarding the team’s efforts, together with reviewing and evaluating progress
Five stages of team development
Include all:
Call on the phone participants at some point during each significant conversation. They may want to join in but just can't be heard

Make sure conversation is verbalized:
No head-nodding or other non-verbal body language
Ask all attendees (including those in the room) to
state their names when they begin speaking
Telephone participants in your meeting
Establish ground rules

Don’t skip this step!

Time spent up-front will pay off through the meeting; the burden of policing will be transferred to the group
Establishing ground rules
An important document that contains the following elements:

Introduction
Explanation of the meeting objectives

Main body
Key topics listed here, along with timings and who’s contributing
Consider the order of the topics

Wrapping-up
Any points that are off-topic, but need to be captured, perhaps for a follow-up meeting



Issue the agenda at least a week ahead of time
...and consider the participants that need to book travel
Meeting agenda
Stakeholders
Who’ll be affected by the outcome

People who will have an input
Who can contribute usefully to the meeting

Decision making person
Remember, the facilitator is not the decision maker

Balanced number
Consider the balance of the argument
Who should participate?
Understand the needs and objectives of the meeting:
Preparation work to be done ahead of the meeting

How to create the agenda:
Some important things to consider

How to deal with minutes from previous meetings
What we will cover
The process and experience is about the participants:

Point participants in the right direction
Make suggestions
Offer guidance
Only make presence felt when necessary
Don’t let power go to your head

Allow the group to do the work
Gentle reminder…it’s not about you
The participants' styles and how they work together
Timekeeper
Larger, complex groups (more than five) may benefit from help keeping to time

Smaller groups can often be managed by the facilitator


Note-taker
Somebody to take minutes
Identify the participant who will be…
Process
Facilitator
Content
Project manager
Content and process
Project manager
What is a facilitator?
Remains content-neutral
Not a project team member

Is not involved in decision-making
Responsibility of project manager and team

Uses effective processes to gain required outcome



Exercise
Skills of a facilitator
Exercise
In two groups, using the flash cards and flip charts provided, prepare two agendas:

1

An agenda for a Wantage-based group of CT participants to meet for a quarterly Project Review taking six hours.

2

A second agenda for an eight hour meeting with a mix of CT, Business and external participants, some of which will need to travel in from abroad.


Draw three columns on the flip chart, note the time, the activity and the details of that activity:


Exercise: 15 minutes
Feedback: 10 minutes
Preparing a meeting agenda
Reflect on what you have learned during this session

Capture the three most important ideas to you

As a result, identify what actions you will take
Participants discussion

The participants are sitting at the same table

Move closer to the table where the participants are sitting and open the discussion to the whole group


The participants are discussing across the room, excluding everybody else

Observe the group and if their
body language
indicates it’s OK, let it go on, but make sure to intervene when necessary
Control the flow of conversation…
Example 2 – asking the right questions (chunk up)
Example 1 – asking the right questions (chunk down)
Handling conflicts – hierarchy of ideas
Handling groups

Conflicts of opinions
Team meeting

You are facilitating a team meeting.
The agenda of the meeting is to
decide which piece of equipment to buy
.
Around the table you have a chemist, a microbiologist and their team leader.

Both speak confidently about how useful each of their pieces of equipment is, but the team leader cannot decide where to invest the money.



Objective of the meeting:
Agree which piece of equipment is most worth buying
Customer meeting

You are facilitating a customer meeting.
The agenda is to determine how to increase sales.
Around the table you have an RPM, innovation director, and people from customer innovations and customer sales.

After two hours they all agree that the best way of doing this is to
improve the image of the product
.



Objective of the meeting:
Agree on a specific brief with real actions
Control the flow of conversation or ideas from abstract to specific, and vice-versa
Too general: No real actions can be agreed

Top level meetings where subjects are discussed in a very abstract way
Too specific: Conflicts arise and no agreement can be reached

Expert meetings where subjects are discussed in a very detailed way
Open Forum Discussion
 
« Handling Difficult Situations »
Don’t forget…

When things go wrong...

don’t blame
remain calm
keep your sense of humor
move on

Handling participants’ complaints

remain neutral
ask for a solution – if OK, apply
see who can help you deal with the issue
Don’t forget…
discussing this?
Do you want to keep
your point
We’ve listened to
you’d…
I can see why
has said…
on what John
Let me build

Respect your participants

Be fair

Be prepared to take control

Ask the participants
Exercise
Engaging the senses in a meeting
Participants behaviors and styles
Be yourself…

See it…



Believe it…

Achieve it!!
Tips and tricks – final word
Tips and tricks - key points
Preparation is key
Know the subject
Know the participants
Prepare the room
Create a clear agenda/road map
Practice what you are going to say


Use cue cards if necessary (number them, keep eye contact)

Speak as clearly and as slowly as you feel comfortable with

Style, change in pace and voice are important
Visualize success
Visualization
Relaxation
Relax
How do you handle stress or stage fright?
Handling stress and stage fright
Overly wound up
(hyper-stress – too much)
Overly relaxed
(hypo-stress – not enough)
Exercise - Stress and stage fright
Relaxation, affirmation, visualization
Facilitator stress and stage fright
My mind is clear and focused
I am an expert in this area
I can do this!
I am calm and confident
Think positive
Learning Log
Ask for clarification should we use unfamiliar terms or jargon

Ask us to slow down if we go too fast
Please...
Question Park
There are actually two parts:
To develop an
“effective meeting culture”
in Crown Technology
2004 survey commissioned by Interactive Meeting Solutions (2004b)
“Some meetings are a waste of time!”
"I know some useful brainstorming and problem solving tools that I could use with a group, but …"

How to use them and work with a group in practice?

How do I get the best output from a group?

How can I spend less time in meetings but still get what I need for my project?
Why have facilitation training?
Introduction
This is your course, so what about...

Cell Phones

Time keeping (breaks)

Confidentiality

Anything else?
Let’s agree on some rules
Housekeeping

8:00am
Start

Setting the scene

9:30am
Morning break

Team and participants behaviors

11:30am
Lunch

Team and participants behaviors (continued)

1:30pm
Afternoon break

Building confidence and enthusiasm

3:30pm
Finish
Agenda

Using the name tents provided:

Write your
name
on the front
.

On the
inside left
write your
experiences
as a facilitator and identify some of your strengths.

On the
inside right
identify some of the
challenges
you have faced as a facilitator and points you would like to improve.

Time allowed: 15 minutes
Feedback: 10 minutes
Introductions & Expectations
This course will...

Help improve your facilitation skills

Provide knowledge, skills and confidence to facilitate meetings successfully
Main learning Objectives
After three days, we remember:

20%
of what we
read
30%
of what we
hear
40%
of what we
see
50%
of what we
say
90%
of what we
hear + see + say + do


Help engage participants:
hear, see, say, and do
Here’s a thought…



Pre-work discussion:
Discuss our preferential senses





Time allowed: 5 minutes
Exercise
Your preferential sense
Some tools and techniques
Watch your body language
Don’t comment on quality of questions
Don’t get side-tracked
Don’t say…
Training for effective facilitation of meetings
END OF PART 1
Review of expectations
Review and download time

Reflect on what you learned during this session

Capture the 3 most important ideas to you
As a result, identify what actions you will take
Meeting minutes - tips
Always
end on time

Summarize any conclusions, decisions, actions

Agree
on who is completing the actions and by when

Clarify
when the meeting minutes and/or actions will be reported back to participants

Agree on time and date of follow-up meeting - ensuring the participants can attend

Always end on a positive note – even if it had involved difficult discussion or disagreements

Finally…
Thank
all participants for coming to the meeting

Close the meeting
Leave 5-10 minutes at the end of the meeting to evaluate the meeting

Ask the group to critique itself
Ask the group to evaluate the facilitator
Ask a trained observer to conduct the evaluation
Conduct a self-evaluation
Evaluate the meeting
Given the amount of time that people spend in meetings, isn't it surprising how seldom the effectiveness of a meeting is evaluated?
Section 4
Evaluating and closing the facilitation Session
Reflect on your effectiveness regarding the various roles of a facilitator and evaluate areas for improvement.
Facilitator self assessment
Global Participants
the big picture
need overall view of program
Remember:

Be concise
Format the minutes to follow the meeting agenda
Issue minutes as soon as possible after meeting
The meeting minutes should include:

A brief summary of the meeting
Date and location of meeting
Names of all participants and their affiliation
List agreed actions with names and deadlines against them
A distribution list with attendees and other interested parties
Any items that were discussed during the wrap-up
Date agreed for next meeting
Main objective
_ _ _ _ _ _
C
Five stages of team development
Five stages of team development
Moon landing
Some examples
The Donation
Part 1
Training for effective facilitation of meetings
(this one day course)


Part 2
Practice facilitating a meeting
(an actual meeting)
List the concepts you have learned so far

What action will you take to employ these concepts in your everyday work?

The facilitator, preparing the meeting, opening the meeting
What is a facilitator?
A
neutral
individual who
guides

a group of people to work
efficiently

together

to
accomplish
their task
Typical project meeting Project meeting with facilitator
Creative meetings
If you want some
innovative thinking
on a recurring task

Risk analysis, problem solving and action plans
You have a problem to solve, a team assigned, but no idea
how to go about it
Highly structured processes e.g. FMEA, FMEA ‘Lite’, QFD

Difficult group dynamics
Keeping a cohesive group

Focus and channel group energy
Steer
the group
to achieve
its objectives

Fresh approach to an issue
Use of a facilitator will change the group dynamics

Decision making
Assist
the group in making timely decisions

When is a facilitator needed?
Small groups (2-3 people) can be advantageous:
At the beginning of complex or novel tasks
Are less threatening and gives maximum participation or 'air space'
Now we know who's attending, let’s help prepare them:
Brief them
on the purpose of the meeting
Send out an
agenda
Consider the use of pre-work

Other points to consider:
Let them know if refreshments/meals are available
Remember to book them in



And it’s important to do this well-ahead of the meeting

Preparing the participants
Re-issue minutes with meeting invite to remind attendees of actions

Include time in the agenda for a status update



Previous meeting minutes
How teams work together, how we process information, participant behaviors and styles
What we will cover
Bruce Tuckman and Mary Jane Jensen model
References:
www.tomorrowtoday.uk.com
www.teaching-millenials.pbworks.com

Facilitator stress and stage fright, facilitating a meeting, handling groups and individuals, handling conflicts of opinion
What we will cover
"I wouldn't do that if I was you"*
* avoid patronizing, political, insincere comments
What we will cover
What we will cover
What we will cover
Fire: Exits and muster
Comfortable?
What is a facilitator?
What to do with them?
How a group develops during the course of a meeting

...And what you can do to guide them through
How to cope with stress

...And how to build confidence
STRESS
What we will cover
Some facilitation techniques

How to handle questions

...And how to invite communication
How to identify and deal with different participant behaviors
A technique to enable group discussions
Evaluate the success of the meeting



And how to critique your facilitation performance
Part 2
Practice facilitating a meeting

What to expect?
Time allowed: 5 minutes
Restrooms
Full transcript