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Angie Rizk

on 26 May 2014

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Transcript of MUSIC AND THE DEAF

Communicate WORDS
through sign language
What about MUSIC?
Music teachers often tell their students:
You need to FEEL the music. It needs to run through your body and not just through your brain and ears.
Who can feel better than the deaf?
When one sense is lacking the other senses make up for it.
The sense of touch or feel is more developed in the deaf than in a hearing person.
How are they able to feel music?
They feel music through VIBRAT ONS
The perception of the musical vibrations by the Deaf is as real as the equivalent sounds, since they are ultimately processed in the same part of the brain.

Not only can they feel rhythm they can also sometimes tell pitch. Depending on where the note vibrates in their body they can tell whether the pitch is high or low. "The low sounds I feel mainly in my legs and feet and high sounds might be particular places on my face, neck and chest"(Duchene).

Music is felt on a physical level by everyone. Getting a buzzing in our core when the bass is plucked or feeling the power of a drum that mimics our life force is universal. A hearing person can only try to imagine the sensations that are much more developed in a deaf person. One can try touching the ground and placing a back against walls at shows trying to see if they can tell the difference in rhythm and the type of instrument being played by the feelings that hum along the body when the music infiltrates the molecules in in the walls and in ourselves as well.
Mandy Harvey
Evelyn Glennie
Ludwig Van Beethoven
deaf at 12 years old
It is said that Beethoven cut off the legs of his piano so he could better feel the vibrations
deaf at 15 years old
deaf at 26 years old
New Technologies
There are about 70 million deaf people in the world
Music and the Deaf
Notre Dame University
Music Appreciation
Ms. Dolcy Lawoun
Spring 2014
Angie Rizk
Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent.
Victor Hugo

Hearing aids
Interview with Austin Chapman
The first song that you heard after having your hearings aids put in was Mozart’s “Lacrimosa”. How would you describe it?
I was carried away by the first half and thought about how beautiful the weaved notes sounded. But then I realized that I’d never been able to hear sounds like that before and I felt a numbing sensation wash over the top of my head and down my spine. The experience was sort of like my first kiss, surreal, but exciting at the same time.
Full transcript