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The Law of Conservation of Matter

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Robyn Davis

on 6 November 2013

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Transcript of The Law of Conservation of Matter

Do You Lose Anything?
This Week's Learning Targets:
- In the 1770’s, a French chemist, Antoine Lavoisier, carried out experiments where he made accurate measurements of mass both before and after a chemical change.
- His data showed that no mass was lost or gained during the change.
It is also referred to as the Law of Conservation of Mass
Definition: The total amount of matter is neither created nor destroyed during any physical or chemical change.
What is the
Law of Conservation of Matter
?
- This law is also called the Law of Conservation of Matter (Mass). This is most often used in a chemical change (reaction)
What are
Reactants
and
Products?
Reactants
– the substances that exist before the reaction

Products
– substances that form as a result of the reaction
Law of Conservation of Matter Practice

Law Of Conservation of Matter Practice
Law of Conservation of Matter Practice
The Law of Conservation of Matter
Robyn Davis
Physical Science
Room 807

Do You Have Any Questions?
By the end of this week, you should know, understand, and be able to do the following:

I can identify and demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter.

This means I can:
define the Law of Conservation of Matter
recognize that the mass of matter should remain the same before and after a change
determine the mass of unknown products or reactants if I know how much mass should be present
balance chemical equations
- It can also be defined this way: In a chemical reaction, the total
mass of reactants must equal the total mass of products.
For example:

If I mix 50 grams of baking soda + 25 grams of vinegar, I will have 75 grams of reactants. As they are mixed, they begin to bubble and fizz and create a gas. If I measure the mass after they are mixed, I would have 75 grams of product (gas + liquid substance).
1. Place about two dozen coins on a table. Sort them into stacks of pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters.
2. Count and record the number of coins in each stack. Calculate and record the value of each stack and the total of all stacks combined.
3. Mix all the coins together and then divide them randomly into four unsorted stacks.
4. Again calculate the value of each stack and the total amount of money. Count the total number of each type of coin.
5. Repeat Steps 3 and 4.


Think It Over
1. What happened to the total value and types of coins when you rearranged them?

2. Did rearranging the coins change the properties of any coin?

3. If you think of the coins as each representing a different type of atom, what does this model tell you about chemical reactions?



How did the activity, "Do You Lose Anything?" relate to the Law of Conservation of Matter?
What does the Law of Conservation of Matter state?

a. The total mass of the reactants is greater than the total mass of the products.
b. The total mass of the reactants is less than the total mass of the products.
c. The total mass of the reactants equals the total mass of the products.
d. Matter cannot change form.

Join the room on Socrative: 99731
Law of Conservation of Matter Practice
2. Which of the following examples demonstrate the Law of Conservation of Matter?

a. MN OP
b. PB GC
c. PB BP
d. MN KL


Dr. Halite combined sodium metal with chlorine gas to make sodium chloride (table salt). The chemical reaction used up all of the metal and all of the gas. If Dr. Halite made 116g of table salt and started with 68g of chlorine, then how many grams of sodium metal did he start with?

a. 22g
b. 48g
c. 68g
d. 116 g
Full transcript