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Transcendentalism & Emily Dickinson

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Julia Drago

on 3 June 2014

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Transcript of Transcendentalism & Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson & Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
& Emily Dickinson

Key Figures & Contributions
"Hope" is the thing with feathers
What Is Transcendentalism?
An idea that men and women have knowledge about themselves and the world around them that “transcends” or exceeds what they can see, hear, taste, touch or feel.
Principles of Transcendentalism
1. An individual is the spiritual center of the universe
2. All knowledge begins with self-knowledge
3. Nature is a living mystery, and is full of signs.
When Did Transcendentalism
Occur?
Causes of Transcendentalism
European ideas threatened the ability of Americans to be self-sufficient
Enlightenment influenced modern thought
Raplh Waldo Emerson
Margaret Fuller
Henry David Thoreau
Father of Transcendentalism
Leader of The Transcendental Club
Inspired people to look into themselves, nature, and art for answers to life's most perplexing questions
Editor of
"The Dial"
(magazine comprised of writings from the era)
Author of
Women in the Nineteenth Century
Carried out an experiment about self-reliance
Nature can show that "all good things are wild and free"
Emily Dickinson
“Hope” is the thing with feathers—
That perches in the soul—
And sings the tune without the words—
And never stops—at all—

And sweetest—in the Gale—is heard—
And sore must be the storm—
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm—

I’ve heard it in the chillest land—
And on the strangest Sea—
Yet, never, in Extremity,
It asked a crumb—of Me.
Who is Emily Dickinson?
Analysis
“Hope”
is the thing with feathers
-
That perches in the soul
-
And sings the tune without the words
-
And never stops

-
at all
-

And sweetest
-
in the Gale

-

is heard
-
And sore must be the storm
-
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm
-

I’ve heard it in the chillest land
-
And on the strangest Sea
-
Yet
-
never
-
in Extremity,
It asked a crumb
-
of me.

Draws attention to the word
Abstract word that will later be defined
Quatrain
Quatrain
Quatrain
“Hope” is the thing with feathers -



That
perches

in the
soul
-



And
sings
the tune without the words -



And never stops - at all -




And
sweetest
- in the Gale - is heard -



And sore must be the
storm
-



That could abash the little Bird



That kept so many warm -





I’ve
heard it in the
chillest land
-



And on the
strangest Sea
-



Yet - never - in
Extremity
,



It asked a crumb - of me.

__________________________
exteneded metaphor: hope(abstract) represented and defined through bird (physical)
bird= living creature defining hope
personification used to decribe hope through actions of bird
}
hope is eternal/ enduring
soul= spiritual enitity
within
human beings. look within oneself to find hope.
storm= Metaphor
difficult circumstances
___________________________
nuturing figure
}
hope always emerges, despite obstacles
sense of comfort
}
nothing can silence the bird/ hope prevails.
hope is comforting in times of trouble
wind

________
spectator: Perspective shift
shift from present to past tense
_______________
great risk
Metaphors representing the terrible conditions that hope can triumph over
}
Hope serves humanity selflessly
}
hope endures even in the most dire of conditions/ whatever life throws at you
dashes used as means of punctionation
“Hope” is the thing with feathers -
That perches in the soul -
And sings the tune without the words -
And never stops - at all -

And sweetest - in the Gale - is heard -
And sore must be the storm -
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm -

I’ve heard it in the chillest land -
And on the strangest Sea -
Yet - never - in Extremity,
It asked a crumb - of me.

Within oneself/ soul
present tense
Outside world/ force of nature
present tense
outside of oneself
past tense
g r a d u a l f r e e d o m
Ties to Transcendentalism
Self discovery/ understanding life through nature
Connection to Emily Dickinson's Life
written shortly after emotional crisis
During crisis, she shut the outside word out and turned to herself -- self discovery of hope
Gradually overcame crisis by searching her soul
Immediate Observations
1st Stanza
2nd Stanza
3rd Stanza
Full transcript