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New Zealand

Kevin Mouayang, Patrick Hu, Kevin Zhou, Martin Aguirre
by

kevin mouayang

on 12 March 2014

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Transcript of New Zealand

The Maori people adopted many aspects of western society and culture such as the use of muskets, but their population decreased due to new diseases. After their recovery they began protest movements thus leading to many wars.

Imperialism of New Zealand

Kevin Zhou,Martin Aguirre, Kevin Mouayang, Patrick Hu
Location

Other names

Country before imperialism
What country imperialized New Zealand?

Why did they imperialized New Zealand?

What did they get from imperializing New Zealand?

How were they treated

What form of imperialism was used on the Maori?
What did the people do about it?

Did they gain independence?
New Zealand is in the southwest Pacific Ocean
latitude and longitude for the country are 41.4395° S, 172.1936° E.
Britain
of course.
After the Treaty of Waitangi first signed on February 6, 1840. the William Hobson (The first governor of New Zealand ) declared New Zealand as part of the British Sovereignty on May 21, 1840.
Aotearoa
"long white cloud"
'Maoriland' 'The Shaky Isles' 'Pig Island' 'Kiwi' 'Nu Tirene'
The Treaty of Waitangi
New Zealand provided numerous natural resources like Gold, Timber, Flax, etc.
Main reason was due to the fear of the French claiming sovereignty over New Zealand.

There were already British settlements in New Zealand along with other europeans.

One reason was Maori chiefs asking the king of Britain for protection from other powers and due to the growing lawlessness of British settlers and illegitimate land purchases.
The signing of The Declaration of Independence of New Zealand on October 28, 1835 was one of the things that lead up to the Treaty of Waitangi.
The Maori People had their rights taken from them, and their people killed off, bringing them to the brink of extinction.
The Europeans stripped the native Maori people of their land by buying the land for unfair prices.
The Maori people began to rebel because the British broke the treaty of Waitangi and that led to countless wars called the "New Zealand Wars" of course the natives were no match for the advanced weaponry of the British thus leading to the near extinction of the Maori peoples. https://deanoworldtravels.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/maori-wars-1.jpg?w=545
Maori had jurisdiction over the New Zealand
Newly introduced illnesses also had a heavy contribution to the decrease in Maori population. Diseases such as as measles, the whooping cough, mumps and more were brought in by the British. http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/death-rates-and-life-expectancy/page-4
Tribes
Food
Animals

Because the Maori had access to weaponry they eventually realized that they could stand a chance against the British thus leading to countless skirmishes with the British.
PIC: http://media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m8l9z3YBEm1qe86h3.jpg

1831, 13 northern Maori Chiefs petitioned to the British Crown asking for protection.
Here is a picture of a Maori native with a musket proving that the Maori people were undergoing influences from the British.
Maori text
Secure Maori land ownership
Secure tribal sovereignty
http://reatygate.wordpress.com/2012/11/04/1831-maori-petition-to-king-for-protection/
English Text

Establish a government
Provide land for settlers
New Zealand was imperialized in the form of Protectorate
What the treaty states
allow the Maori to keep their land and possessions for as long as they wanted.

It gave the Crown the authority to govern over the Maori and New Zealand.

It made New Zealand and official colony of the British.

The Maori gained full status and rights of British citizens supposedly.

It gave the British exclusive right to buy land from the Maori.
With their muskets and new weaponry the wars started to change and the Maori people began to stand a chance.
Maori Petition for protection from King of England-1831
Which is Southeast of Australia
Part of Commonwealth Realms
(the blue countries)
Maori version of the declaration
English version of the declaration of independence.
What the declaration state
The colonization of New Zealand by British settlers drastically affected the indigenous population by introducing deadly diseases and firearm warfare, which brought the Maori people close to extinction. British settlers also carried over many intellectual ideas from Europe.
Thesis
The chiefs declared that New Zealand an independent state designated by The United Tribes of New Zealand.

All sovereign power and authority within the territories of The United Tribes of New Zealand was held collectively by the chiefs of New Zealand.

The chiefs of The United Tribes of New Zealand agree to meet in Waitangi on every autumn to make laws and decisions.

A copy of this declaration will sent to the King of Great Britain and its also thanks the king for his acknowledgment of their Flag and asks the king to continue being the parent of New Zealand.
The British obtained most of the land of New Zealand and New Zealand became a British colony.
Great Britain also solidified their authority in Oceania having both Australia and New Zealand under their sovereignty.
Key events
British Residency at New Zealand,
Bay of Islands, 30th October, 1835.
Sir,

In adopting the measures I have thought necessary to defeat the enterprise which you have announced to me in your letter dated from Papeete Bay, Otaheiti, on the 14th ultimo, I have acted on the discretion which as an accredited representative of the British Government I have considered it my duty to exercise, under circumstances of so extraordinary a character. But even had I been entrusted with no powers at all in this respect, I should have thought it my duty upon the broad principles of common justice and humanity to have used whatever influence I possessed to prevent the occurrence of so much mischief as would be the inevitable result of an attempt upon the liberties of a free people ....

The British Government has extended to the natives of this country, as well as to His Britannic Majesty's subjects, the protection of British laws, so far as regards the conduct of British subjects. But with the present Independence of the natives, or with their personal or territorial rights, it has not interfered, nor permitted its subjects to interfere.…

Even if the chiefs mentioned in the deed would have considered this the price, instead of the earnest thereof (as the axes were considered by them to be) you would have had to satisfy the claims of probably five hundred other individuals before you would have been permitted to take possession of your property, for the meanest of the New Zealanders is not a person to submit quietly to the most trivial inroad upon his rights. This disposes of your claim to any property in the soil of this country. But however well-founded a claim might have been, the chiefs are well aware that it would have been forfeited by your pretensions to Sovereign Rights: and they request me to warn you against approaching their lands, in whatever capacity you may choose to present yourself, or however accompanied, on pain of being treated as Independent States have a right to treat persons who attempt the usurpation of their sovereign rights within their territories.

Being persuaded that the utter hopelessness of success will present itself to your mind in so strong a light as to prove to you the madness of persisting in your enterprise, and the criminality of engaging persons less qualified to judge to embark upon it, it seems almost supererogatory to add that should you present yourself, with whatever face, you may be sure of meeting with the most spirited resistance from the whole population… a population with whom warfare in its fiercest form has been a sport, and who are far from being ill-provided with arms and ammunition.

If the steps I have taken should, under Providence, be the means of preventing the sacrifice of even one life in a bad cause, I know I shall be held excused by His Majesty's Government for giving an appearance of importance to your enterprise, to which, apart from such a consideration, it has not the remotest title.

I am, Sir,
Your most obedient servant,

James Busby,


British Resident.
Having but a few hours to write, I must refrain from entering as minutely as I could wish on the contents of your letter, which seems to have been written with intent to intimidate a man of weak nerve, who would feebly renounce his rights and forgo the objects which have brought him to these remote regions.

But in this, Sir, you mistake me, for I am neither very ignorant of worldly affairs, nor very easily frightened out of my plans. The which, with the blessing of God, I will bring ere long to desired maturity.

Acting on the broad principle that New Zealand is not a possession of the British Crown, I come forward as the humble champion of present and future New Zealand liberties. That my timber has been cut and is daily cutting, is sold and is daily selling, to my great loss, the loss of many thousands of pounds, all this I well know. But what I never expected to know is that an agent of the Crown of England would warn me not to approach my own property. Were we living under a Dey of Algiers, such things might be believed, but they are monstrous in British annals.… Such a thing is impossible, for were the King to deprive me of my lands, I would be an oppressed man; and if warned off my property by the King, a persecuted man; and thirty millions of voices would be raised in my defence, for there is not a person in Great Britain, from the peer to the peasant, but will side with the oppressed.

I must ask in what I have aimed a blow at the liberties of the people of New Zealand? Is it by coming thousands of miles to arrest their too rapid demoralisation and degradation, and by wishing to raise them to the level of civilisation? Is it by devoting all my earthly substance to them? Is it by bringing a young family to dwell among them? By encountering dangers and privations, and by my willingness to live and die in their cause, that I show myself to be the dangerous man you are pleased to picture me?

Look at the United States, the Canadas, the West Indies, South America, the Cape of Good Hope, New Holland and Van Diemen's Land: and you may point an instructive moral to the New Zealanders. When the New Zealand chiefs who received a flag (for the benefit of a few white people who wanted registers for New Zealand-built ships), assisted at this extraordinary ceremony, how were they treated? As equals, or as inferiors? Did they dine at the same table with the whites; or is it true, as newspapers report, that they “were supplied with a plentiful mess of flour sweetened with sugar, on which they feasted”?

Is this the manner in which hereditary chiefs are to be treated? It is thus, sir, that the proud spirit of the native race is broken and degraded. They are spoken of as sovereigns, and treated as slaves. But there is yet a voice which shall be heard by these devoted PAGE 86 people; they shall learn the truth, they shall see how hereditary chiefs ought to be treated. And then, if they think it is to their interest to treat me as you have so humanely advised, they may kill and eat me, and history shall tell her own version, which will never redound very greatly to the credit of those who represented me other than one of the earliest and best friends of the New Zealand people.

I am, Sir,
Yours very obediently,

Charles, Baron de Thierry

. Forwarded by the brig Criterion, August 30th, 1836.
New Zealand Constitution Act in 1852
William Hobson, first governor of New Zealand and co-author of The Treaty of Waitangi.
United Kingdom gave New Zealand "Dominion" status in 1907
Gold rush in Otago 1860's
Constitution Act of 1986
VS
British president of New Zealand

Co-author of The Treaty of Waitangi

Person who drafted the Declaration of Independence of New Zealand.
Politics
New Zealand Parliament has legislative power and consists of the Queen and the House of Representatives
Economy
James Busby
Dependent on trade


139.8 billion GDP


New Zealand "Kiwi"= $0.84 USD
Letter by James Busby in response to the land claims made my french man Charles de Thierry. In the letter he states " In adopting the measures I have thought necessary to defeat the enterprise which you have announced to me in your letter dated from Papeete Bay, Otaheiti, on the 14th ultimo, I have acted on the discretion which as an accredited representative of the British Government I have considered it my duty to exercise" and "The British Government has extended to the natives of this country, as well as to His Britannic Majesty's subjects, the protection of British laws, so far as regards the conduct of British subjects."
New Zealand Parliament building
Charles de Theirry
In the letter in response to James Busby Charles de Thierry states "But in this, Sir, you mistake me, for I am neither very ignorant of worldly affairs, nor very easily frightened out of my plans." and " Acting on the broad principle that New Zealand is not a possession of the British Crown, I come forward as the humble champion of present and future New Zealand liberties."
The Native Maori of New Zealand were colonized by British settles, drastically being affected by deadly diseases, firearms,
and many battles bringing them to the brink of extinction. The British had introduced a written language, creating new
technologies, all while taking land from the Maori at lowered prices and reselling them at
greater prices and making a huge profit. Long before Great Britain imperialized New Zealand muskets were introduced,
which helped modernize the Maori, but once the British began to settle diseases were spread to the Maori which resulted
in many misfortunes anda decline in the population.
Tried to establish Settlement in northern New Zealand.

Claimed to have bought 40,000 acres from Maori.

Prompted James Busby to write the Declaration and the Treaty.


Conclusion
Full transcript