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Star Constellations

Some of the most common.
by

Jayme Dunn

on 4 May 2011

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Transcript of Star Constellations

Star Constellations What are they? Most Common Orion Ursa Major Ursa Minor Draco Cassiopeia Hercules Dictionary Definition: any of various groups of stars to which definite names have been given Constellations were made up by poets, farmers, and astronomers over the past 6000+ years. Farmers planted most crops in the spring and harvested in the fall. In regions in which there was little difference between the seasons, famers used the constellations to tell what season it was since different constellations were visible in different seasons. There are 88 officially recognized constellations today. Many are based on mythylogical traditions from ancient Greek and Mid-Eastern civilizations, such as Hercules, who was the son of the Greek god Zeus. A sky map for July Poets... and farmers... No, no. Not that one... This one. Zeus, the king of the Greek gods, god of the Sky, Thunder and Lightning, Law, Order and Justice. He ruled mount Olympus. Best seen in November around 9:00pm
Visible between latitudes 90 and -20 degrees Best seen in July around 9:00pm
Visible between latitudes 90 and -15 degrees Best seen in July around 9:00pm
Visible between latitudes 90 and -50 degrees Best seen in January around 9:00pm
Visible between latitudes 85 and -75 degrees Most commonly known as the "Big Dipper"
Best seen in April around 9:00pm
Visible between latitudes 90 and -30 degrees Most commonly known as the "Little Dipper"
Best seen in June around 9:00pm
Visible between latitudes 90 and -10 degrees
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