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The Bonesetter's Daughter.

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Jackie White

on 15 May 2013

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Transcript of The Bonesetter's Daughter.

About the Author Amy Tan Form, Structure and Plot The novel is divided into three books, which are further divided into chapters. Chapters from Ruth's perspective are numbered while Lu Ling's story is labeled with Chinese characters. Research and Literary Criticism The New York Times: The written word
Ruth is an editor who deals with words every day
her mother, and Precious Auntie each wrote out their life story
words are more permanent and heavy when written and committed to paper The Bonesetter's Daughter By Sarah Lyons and Jackie White Final Project Amy Tan "I think books were my salvation, they saved me from being miserable." Born: February 19, 1952 in Oakland, California Published The Bonesetter's Daughter in 2001 Tan's mother, Daisy, had a frightening past with an abusive husband Tan's father and oldest brother died of brain tumors Like the mother and daughter in the novel, Tan and her mother did not get along well Tan visited China with her mother after her mother recovered from a serious illness, and the trip helped her understand her mother more and saved their relationship. In the novel, the daughter understands her mother's past more and saves their relationship too. Characters Setting Diction Imagery Symbolism Ironic Devices Tone Theme Significance of Title Memorable Quotes Syntax Final Thoughts bones
bones symbolize family and ancestors
dragon bones were a sacred part of Luling's heritage, believed to have magical powers
bones are magical because they symbolize family, and hold the family together The title seems insignificant until near the end of the novel, when the reader realizes the bonesetter's daughter is central to the entire story. The story is a blend of three subplots detailing the lives of three generations of women: Precious Auntie, Lu Ling Young, and Ruth Young. Ruth and Lu Ling have a rocky relationship, but when Ruth translates and reads her mother's life story she begins to understand her more, helping to heal their relationship. CHINA America *Bao Bomu's Story
*Superstition
*Tragedy
*Traditional Values
*The Old *Ruth's Story
*Logic
*Hope
*New Beginning
*Forgiveness
*Modern "But this was the worst part: Being the only child of a widow, Ruth had always been forced to serve as LuLing's mouthpiece. By the time she was ten, Ruth was the English speaking "Mrs. LuLing Young" on the telephone, the one who made appointments for the doctor, who wrote letters to the bank. Once she even had to compose a humiliating letter to the minister.
"Lootie give me so much trouble," LuLing dictated, as if Ruth were invisible, "maybe I send her go Taiwan, school for bad children. What you think?"
Ruth revised that to: "Perhaps Ruth might attend a finishing school in Taiwan where she can learn the manners and customs of a young lady. What is your opinion?" (Tan 50). Written Words and Calligraphy Superstition Dramatic Irony Situational Irony “These are the women who shaped her life, who are in her bones. They caused her to question whether the order and disorder of her life were due to fate or luck, self-determination or the actions of others. They taught her to worry. But she has also learned that these warning were passed down, not simply to scare her, but to force her to avoid their footsteps, to hope for something better. They wanted her to get rid of the curses,” (Tan 402). “”Please let me know you are not mad at me,” her mother went on. “Give me a sign. I have tried to tell you how sorry I am, but I don’t know if you’ve heard. Can you hear me?"" (Tan 85-86). "I know all this, yet there is one name I cannot remember. It is there in the oldest layer of my memory, and I cannot dig it out," (Tan 1). “Her grandmother had a name. Gu Liu Xin. She had existed. She still existed. Precious Auntie belonged to a family. Lu Ling belonged to that same family, and Ruth belonged to them both,” (Tan 399). Family is an inextricable part of identity. Love is defined by relationships, not marriage. Ruth believes LuLing is suffering from dementia. The reader knows LuLing's memories are accurate. Marriages gone awry. Ruth & Art LuLing and Pan Kai Jing LuLing and Edwin Young GaoLing and Fu Nan *Usually longer sentences, complex but not confusing. *Characters' speech reflects a lot about them *English and Chinese Bibliography Tan, Amy. The Bonesetter's Daughter. New York City, Ballantine Books, 2001. Print. Ruth is the main protagonist, an editor, and the daughter of a chinese immigrant. The main focus in the novel is her growth in understanding her mother. Ruth is a dynamic character, and changes as the novel progresses. "But this was the worst part: Being the only child of a widow, Ruth had always been forced to serve as LuLing's mouthpiece. By the time she was ten, Ruth was the English speaking "Mrs. LuLing Young" on the telephone, the one who made appointments for the doctor, who wrote letters to the bank. Once she even had to compose a humiliating letter to the minister.
"Lootie give me so much trouble," LuLing dictated, as if Ruth were invisible, "maybe I send her go Taiwan, school for bad children. What you think?"
Ruth revised that to: "Perhaps Ruth might attend a finishing school in Taiwan where she can learn the manners and customs of a young lady. What is your opinion?" (Tan 50). The word mouthpiece gives the idea that Ruth feels like an object. "Humiliating" reflects how Ruth's mother makes her feel about her culture; she is ashamed of her mother. As the narrator is describing a time in Ruth's life when she is having concerns about her cultural heritage, her identity comes into question.The constant referral to her name in this passage contrasts with the events. Melodramatic- all of the characters are pretty emotional, and almost like a soap opera at times (the mothers threatening to kill themselves when their daughters are irritated) LuLing is another main character, and the mother of Ruth. While she changes to the reader, her character changes because Ruth begins to understand her more. She is a static character, because in reality she does not change. Bao Bomu, or Precious Auntie, LuLing's biological mother, is a minor character because while her background does contribute to the plot, she is dead while the main events are occurring and her story only comes out in flashbacks. Edwin Young, Ruth's father, is killed in an accident and therefore not actively present in the novel, however he is very influential on Lu Ling and Ruth. "Reading this tripartite novel is like peering into a carved ivory ball that contains numerous smaller balls, each revealing a different design but all worked from a single source" Publishers Weekly: "This luminous and gripping book demonstrates enhanced tenderness and wisdom, however; it carries the texture of real life and reflects the paradoxes historical events can produce"
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