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Byzantine Art

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by

Erika Stonehouse

on 23 September 2014

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Transcript of Byzantine Art

Byzantine Art
chapter eight
Late Byzantine Art
pgs. 258-263
pgs. 248-258
Middle Byzantine Art
Early Byzantine Art
pgs. 232-248
CHURCH OF HAGIA SOPHIA, CONSTANTINOPLE
p. 235
EMPEROR JUSTINIAN AND HIS ATTENDANTS
p. 241
EMPRESS THEODORA AND HER ATTENDANTS
p. 241
INTERIOR OF THE CHURCH OF HAGIA SOPHIA
p. 237
VIRGIN AND CHILD WITH SAINTS AND ANGELS
p. 246
VIRGIN AND CHILD IN THE APSE OF HAGIA SOPHIA
p. 248
FRONT (A) OF THE HARBAVILLE TRIPTYCH
p. 255
BACK (B) OF THE HARBAVILLE TRIPTYCH
p. 255
MOSAICS IN THE VAULTING OF THE INNER NARTHEX
p. 259
Chora Church
MOSAICS IN THE VAULTING OF THE INNER NARTHEX
p. 259
Chora Church
ANNUNCIATION TO THE VIRGIN
p. 262
THE HOSPITALITY OF ABRAHAM
p. 263
A Brief History
Christianized Roman world became the Byzantine Empire in approximately 330 CE
Emperor Contstantine I dedicated a new Rome after himself on the site of the ancient Greek colony, Byzantium
Byzantine is broadly used to describe the art and architecture of Constantinople
Three "golden ages": Early Byzantine Art, Middle Byzantine Art and Late Byzantine Art
Closely associated with the reign of Emperor Justinian I (527-565) and Empress Theodora
With Justinian and Theodora, political power, wealth and culture were at their peak
Began in the fifth century
Mosaics were popular forms of art. They showed the daily life and riches of the empire
Ended in 726 at the beginning of the iconoclast controversy that led to the destruction of religious images
Iconoclastic controversy grew in the Byzantine world over the proper use of religious images
This resulted in the ordering the destruction of religious images
Only a few survived in isolated areas
Iconoclasm was then reversed in 843
Icons played a crucial role in Byzantine art
Hagia Sophia in Constantinople
pgs. 235-237
The church of Hagia Sophia, meaning "Holy Wisdom"
Remains in Constantinople
Embellished with 40,000 pounds of silver that Justinian I donated
The dome of the church is considered a major architectural accomplishment
The church designed to emphasize spirituality
Began in 843 when Empress Theodora (810-867) reinstated that religious icons were allowed in art and worship
Churches were thriving and the military was the most successful it had ever been
A time of creativity and inventiveness
At this time, art was in a period of revival and rediscovery of old history, but also expansion and new ideas
Ended when Christian Crusaders from Western Europe occupied Constantinople in 1204
Precious Objects of Commemoration, Veneration and Devotion
pgs. 255-256
Artists produced small and portable luxury items for Church dignitaries
Show high status and wealth
These works combined technical skill and beauty with religious meaning
The Harbaville Triptych is a portable devotional object. An ivory carving, approximately 9 inches tall
Icons and Iconoclasm
pgs. 246-248
Began with the restoration of Byzantine rule in 1261
The arts underwent a resurgence known as the Palaeologic Renaissance
Renewed church building and the production of icons, books and objects
Ended with the empire's fall to the Ottoman Turks in 1453
Late Byzantine art continued until the 18th century in the Ukraine, Russia, and Southeastern Europe
Constantinople: The Chora Church
pgs. 258-259
Renovated, redecorated and expanded during the Palaeologue Renaissance
One of the several projects that Theodore Metochites (1270-1332) sponsored
Contains the most impressive interior decorations remaining from this time period
Covered with frescos and mosaics
Icons
pgs. 262-263
Instead of using linear one-point perspective or "renaissance perspective", Byzantine artists used forward projection perspective to drawing attention to the figures
Innovative System of Perspective
pg. 259
Characteristics of Byzantine Art Under Palaeologues:
Small heads of figures
Inflated bodies
Light-shot silk of their clothing
Forward projection perspective
Caryatids perched on columns
Mathematics to create ideal figures and consistency
Prominent contours
Long bodies
Limited number of figures
References
Cormack, Robin. Byzantine art. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Print.

Stokstad, Marilyn, and Michael Cothren. "Byzantine Art." Art history. 5th ed. Boston: Pearson, 2013. 233-263. Print.
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