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Hunting Snake Poem Analysis by JT

English - David Berry
by

Josefina Torres

on 7 September 2012

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Transcript of Hunting Snake Poem Analysis by JT

Sun-warmed in this late season's grace
under the autumn's gentlest sky
we walked, and froze half-through a pace.
The great black snake went reeling by. HUNTING SNAKE
By Judith Wright Head down, tongue flickering on the trail
he quested through the parting grass;
sun glazed his curves of diamond scale,
and we lost breath to watch him pass. What track he followed, what small food
fled living from his fierce intent,
we scarcely thought; still as we stood
our eyes went with him as he went. Cold, dark and splendid he was gone
into the grass that hid his prey.
We took a deeper breath of day,
looked at each other, and went on. With the word "froze" the tone of the poem shifts to a tense and stressfull one in comparison to the previous warm set atmosphere. Shows how even through all its ferociousness, the snake is still beautiful The snake symbolises coldness and darkness resembling that of night's, so when he is no longer present there is a sense of daylight and warmth, which is represented here as a "breath of day" Thank you for your
attention

By Josefina Torres 5+7= (cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr (cc) image by anemoneprojectors on Flickr Born 31 May 1915 – die 26 June 2000
Famous Australian poet, as many poets she was fascinated by her surroundings such as the country side of Australia for example: aboriginal life and reverence for nature.
She studied: philosophy, English, history, psychology
1994 she won the Human Wrights and Equal opportunity commission poetry award for collected poems BIOGRAPHY g
h
h
g e
f
e
f c
d
c
d a
b
a
b Sun-warmed in this late season’s grace
under the autumn’s gentlest sky
we walked, and froze half-through a pace.
The great black snake went reeling by. 

Head down, tongue flickering on the trail
he quested through the parting grass,
sun glazed his curves of diamond scale
and we lost breath to see him pass. 

What track he followed, what small food
fled living from his fierce intent,
we scarcely thought; still as we stood
our eyes went with him as he went.

 Cold, dark and splendid he was gone
into the grass that hid his prey.
We took a deeper breath of day,
looked at each other, and went on. Rhyme Scheme LITERARY DEVICES KEY The poet is talking about the climate creating
a warm and harmonious atmosphere by using
words such as: sun-warmed and grace. "autumn´s gentlest sky" gives you a warm, calm cozy atmosphere. This full stop increases the importance of the following idea. By using the word "great" the poet gives the creature a sense of powerfullness and importance The colour "black" is associated with darkness, gives you the idea of something evil approaching. to whirl around Making quick sudden movements, in this case the movement the snakes maked with their tongues Judith is describing the snake with a slightly dangerous tone The act of pursuing something, going in search. Then the poet is telling us how the sun shined at "his curves of diamond scale". By writing that the snake "quested through" the poet is humanising the snake (that really only has animal insticts), giving it human-like qualities such as to set out on a quest. "Diamond" rare and precious, this description of the snake skin makes the reader wonder if the poet is looking at the beauty and uniqueness of the creature despite the first impression Judith is trying to tell the reader how this dangerous species at the same time can cause a positive or negative impact on people Implies that the snake has set out to accomplish something. The alliteration of the consonants "f" and "s" provides a sense of the snake's predatory state. The idea changes because now they are trying to observe the reality of situation, making the atmosphere more tense shows us the size of the snake as its prey is considered smaller The word "fierce" highlights the wildness of the snake. The impact on the poet and his companion ("we") was so strong that they were completely in awe. According to the analysis, "Hunting snake" is a simple poem about a snake the poet once encountered and was amazed by it.

The poem is simple in language (since it does not use complicated words) and in rhythm (since it has an "a b a b" structure).

In researching about this poem and taking into consideration Judith Wright's roots (Australian) she may have had another metaphoric meaning for this poem. The black snake may have also represented the aboriginal people of Australia and the people that see it are the british who came to occupy Australia. IN CONCLUSION Sources:
1.http://www.wesgreen.net/3/pdf/Revision%20Topics/HS%20and%20TC%20note9.pdf
2.http://ericmacknight.com/igcse/2011/09/hunting-snake-by-judith-wright-one-body-paragraph/

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